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NEWS
July 15, 1997
THE LEGISLATIVE MANDATE was crystal clear: "The governor shall create a commission to study ways to improve the financial viability of the racing industry." Yet since Gov. Parris N. Glendening signed this measure into law in May, no commission has been established.Time is of the essence. The legislation requires the 12-member panel to "report the results of its study, including findings and recommendations" by Nov. 1. It can't come soon enough for Maryland racing, which faces perilous times.
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | September 13, 2014
Et cetera Apprentice rider Ritvo wins at Laurel Park in his first race in Maryland Apprentice rider Michael Ritvo guided Winter Lady to victory in the eighth race at Laurel Park on Friday on his first Maryland mount. Ritvo, 20, who moved his tack from Gulfstream Park to the Mid-Atlantic last week, kept Winter Lady in close contention along the rail in the 6-furlong $45,000 optional allowance test for fillies and mares before slipping past front-runner Who Needs on the turn and turning back Proud to be Wild in the stretch to win by four lengths in 1 minute, 10.33 seconds.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 29, 2001
Send the children to stock market camp. They can put themselves through college. Rumsfeld will strengthen defense by getting rid of bases, ships, bombers, missiles, personnel and treaties. OK? The best players skip it; reformers attack its priorities; betting on it may be outlawed: College basketball is in grave danger of going amateur. Don't worry about the decline of racing in Maryland. There's always tip jars.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
If the horse racing world needed a little more evidence heading into Preakness week that the erstwhile "Sport of Kings" has turned a corner in Maryland, consider this scene on a misty Friday morning at the idyllic Fair Hill Training Center outside Elkton. Stuart Janney III, who was sitting pretty with Kentucky Derby winner Orb at this time last year, is walking the grounds with his wife, Lynn, and Hall of Fame trainer Shug McGaughey, inspecting the barn that Janney and cousin Ogden Mills Phipps purchased last August and made into a seasonal hub of their racing operation just three weeks ago. Yes, that Stuart Janney, the descendent of racing royalty who once tried to help fix Maryland racing when it seemed to be on a stretch run to ruin.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser | March 8, 2001
Joe De Francis, president and CEO of the Maryland Jockey Club, said yesterday that he plans to meet with representatives of the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association to try to resolve the dispute over when to shut down for Colonial Downs. The MTHA, an organization of trainers and owners, issued a news release Tuesday reiterating its opposition to ceasing racing in Maryland so that thoroughbreds can race June 9-July 14 at Colonial Downs in Virginia. The MTHA prefers to send its horses there in September, as in the past.
NEWS
By Stanley C.Dillon | February 10, 1991
Did you know there once were two speedways in Carroll County?Didyou know Maryland has had nearly oval 30 tracks, but only two remain?One man knows all this and more, and he lives in South Carroll. When someone wants information about area auto racing from the past, they call Larry Jendras.Jendras, a draftsman for Bechtel Corp. in Gaithersburg, has perhaps the largest collection of racing photos, programs and newspaper clippings in Maryland.He has more than 50 albums crammed with racing photos from the early days, including memorabilia from speedways that most of us never knew existed.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2000
The Maryland Racing Commission deferred action yesterday on next year's schedule at Pimlico and Laurel Park while the state's thoroughbred horsemen consider the schedule at Colonial Downs, the Maryland Jockey Club-managed track in Virginia. The board of directors of the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association, an organization of trainers and owners, will meet Jan. 3 to decide when it would prefer to cease live racing in Maryland so thoroughbreds can run at Colonial Downs. Racing dates at Colonial Downs are the province of the Virginia Racing Commission, not the Maryland horsemen.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1998
Returning home after two weeks spent climbing mountains in Ecuador, Joe De Francis declined yesterday to shed light on the possible sale of a minority interest in Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park.De Francis, principal owner of the tracks, said the loan agreement between the Maryland Jockey Club, of which he is president and chief executive officer, and the estate of former Washington Redskins owner Jack Kent Cooke contains a confidentiality clause."I have to respect that," De Francis said.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2005
Colonial Downs, the Virginia track managed by the Maryland Jockey Club, has received approval from the Virginia Racing Commission to conduct the "Grand Slam of Grass," four turf races that will offer a $2 million bonus to a horse who can sweep the series. The track between Richmond and Williamsburg will run the first two races during its summer meet, June 24 through Aug. 16. The third race is to be determined and the fourth race will be the Breeders' Cup Turf. The two races at Colonial Downs, both for 3-year-olds, will be the inaugural, $500,000 Colonial Turf Cup on June 25 and the $750,000, Grade III Virginia Derby on July 16. The last two winners of the Virginia Derby, Silver Tree and Kitten's Joy, competed in last fall's Breeders' Cup. "We're pretty proud of the horses who've won and gone on to the Breeders' Cup from our race," said John Mooney, Colonial Downs' general manager.
SPORTS
By Pete Bielski | September 6, 1993
Apprentice jockey Walter Cullum needs to win at least two races to take the Timonium riding title, which concludes with today's 11-race card.If he prevails, Cullum, 20, would become the second family member to gain notoriety in the racing industry, though Cullum hardly brags of it.He is the nephew of former rider Ronnie Franklin, the one-time apprentice who rode Spectacular Bid to victories in the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness Stakes in 1979. Of course, Franklin has had his troubles since and is no longer in the game.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | April 4, 2013
That the Orioles could be turned around and have a winning season in 2012 and then open the 2013 season with a victory possibly is reason to hope that other Maryland sporting traditions can be revived. Three cross country horse races that constitute what is informally known as Maryland's Triple Crown of steeplechase racing get their start this weekend and next in Harford County with the decades old traditions surrounding the Elkridge-Harford Point to Point and the My Lady's Manor races, to be followed by the Hunt Cup a few miles to the west in Baltimore County.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
Maryland's thoroughbred horse racing tracks and the state's horsemen are close to agreement on a 10-year deal that would give the industry stability it has not seen in decades, those involved in the negotiations say. "We've had years of not knowing what the future would hold," said Alan Foreman, the lawyer for the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association. "But now we're running for historic levels of purse money and are on the cusp of an unprecedented revenue-sharing agreement with the track operator.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
ESPN's Jeannine Edwards started her TV career as an in-track host at Pimlico and Laurel in the early 1990s. “It allowed me to learn television, because I came from a background of  training horses and had no TV experience,” she says. “So I owe a lot of my success and a debt of gratitude to the people in Maryland for giving me a start.” Edwards, who still calls Maryland home, is covering the Preakness for ESPN and ABC this week. Her reports will start appearing Friday on the sports channel and continue through the weekend.
NEWS
May 19, 2011
From the Alibi Breakfast to the solid-silver Woodlawn Vase and the Black-eyed Susan blanket draped over the winning horse, the Preakness Stakes is steeped in history and tradition. Saturday's much-anticipated contest at Pimlico Race Course will be — as it has been for generations — Maryland's biggest annual sporting event. The thundering herd of 14 3-year-olds, the fastest in the world, will sprint around a 1 3/16-mile-long dirt track with more than 100,000 people from the well-dressed ladies in fashionable hats of the club house to the more plebeian, if no less exhilarated, throngs of the "Kegasus" infield bear witness — along with a and a national television audience of millions.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2011
Ramon Dominguez has gone to post thousands of times, but settling his horse in the starting gate for Preakness is especially exhilarating and requires all of his concentration. "The people are going crazy and it gets you in the mood," he said. "But then you have to zoom out. You really don't hear anything. You have to think about getting ready about what's to come. If the horse is ready to break, you are so focused. But the only time you realize that is when a horse throws a fit and you have to wait and reset.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Su | November 6, 2010
The day after his filly Shared Account, a 46-1 long shot, had come home the winner in the Breeders' Cup $2 million Filly & Mare Turf race, Kevin Plank of Sagamore Farms was happy to recall the moment and what he thinks it should mean to Maryland horseracing. "Number one, in the owners' box, you want to act like you've been there before," he said. "But we were jumping up and down. There is nothing like winning a major race in an international field. There's nothing like proving you're the best in the world.
SPORTS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | May 17, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley said yesterday that "a limited number of slots at the tracks" could help save thoroughbred horse racing in Maryland, and that without passage of a modest gambling proposal, the Preakness will be lost. "I believe and have for many years that we will not have the 17,000 racing jobs in Maryland" without the addition of slots, O'Malley said during a news conference in Annapolis, days before the race. "We will no longer have the open space that is horse-related open space in Maryland.
NEWS
June 20, 1994
Just when things are starting to look up for the state's racing industry, along comes a suggestion that could prove devastating. This month Pimlico Race Course finished its most successful spring meeting ever, and yet some racing officials are already talking about converting Maryland's race tracks to all-purpose gambling facilities complete with slot machines, electronic video poker, live poker games and other casino offerings.Introducing Slots & Co. to the race tracks could eventually kill the racing game in Maryland.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2010
On a grand, blue-sky day at Pimlico Race Course, trainer Tony Dutrow said it was easy to imagine that horse racing in Maryland is as vibrant now as when he was a boy tending barns for his father 40 years ago. But Dutrow knows better. It's often bittersweet for him -- and other former Marylanders such as jockey Edgar Prado -- to return to the state where racing once thrived and experience its decline firsthand. "You don't feel the atmosphere the same way," said Prado, 42, who rode Yawanna Twist to a fourth-place finish in Saturday's Preakness.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | May 16, 2009
When New Mexico trainer Chip Woolley was driving across the continent with his painful broken leg in a splint to enter Mine That Bird in the Kentucky Derby, it probably never occurred to him that horse racing might no longer be worth the effort. The same goes for the thousands of horsemen and horsewomen who get up in the dark every morning at racing facilities big and small to muck their stalls and dream the Triple Crown dream Woolley is living right now. Maybe it was just an oversight, but nobody informed them that this is an X Games world now and that most people would rather watch some kid jump off a ramp on a little bicycle or skateboard.
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