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NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2003
There aren't many sure things in horse racing, but state officials say that Saturday's Preakness Stakes - and the surrounding hoopla - are a safe bet to pump $60 million into Baltimore's economy. The city's major hotels say they have to turn away thousands of potential guests, and spending on food, drinks and transportation is solid. In some cases, the annual windfall represents a company's biggest day of the year. Even with Pimlico Race Course's aging facilities, the event is a dependable economic boost because the winner of the Kentucky Derby nearly always runs in the Preakness, giving racing fans hope of seeing the first Triple Crown winner since Affirmed in 1978.
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BUSINESS
By Christine Demkowych and Christine Demkowych,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 11, 2003
On most days, Pimlico Good Neighbors is a quiet community of brick rowhouses and free-standing bungalows nestled along tree-lined streets. But on Preakness Day this tiny neighborhood - tucked behind the northwest corner of historic Pimlico Race Course - is transformed into a bustling hub of commercial activity. Lawns become parking lots, back yards double as concession stands, and kids work as porters hauling coolers and other spectator paraphernalia for race fans. On Saturday, more than 100,000 people are expected to watch the Preakness, the second jewel of horse racing's Triple Crown.
NEWS
August 10, 2002
Nicholas J. DeLuca, former owner of a popular Remington tavern and an avid thoroughbred racing fan, died Wednesday at Sinai Hospital of injuries suffered in a traffic accident. He was 83. Mr. DeLuca, who had lived in Mount Washington for more than 50 years, was returning home from Pimlico Race Course on Wednesday when he was involved in an automobile accident on Northern Parkway. He was born and raised on Huntingdon Avenue in the city's Remington section. He was a graduate of Polytechnic Institute.
NEWS
December 15, 2001
W. Md. track will help revive racing The five Maryland Racing Commissioners who voted unanimously to approve the Rickman family's Phase II application to construct a new racing facility in Allegany County strongly feel that this new track will be an excellent addition to Maryland racing. And The Sun's editorial "A stalking horse, not a real racehorse" (Nov. 29) contained numerous statements we feel compelled to respond to. It indicated that Gov. Parris N. Glendening and House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. are creating "a stalking horse for slot machines."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2001
As the racing season comes to an end, I thought a look at the new books that have crossed my desk would be a good way to wrap up the year and give some of you ideas for holiday presents: Prototypes, the History of the IMSA GTP Series by J.A Martin and Ken Wells (David Bull Publishing, $89.95). Author Jim Martin is from Chase. He is an industrial designer who started writing about motorsports so he could get closer to the cars and drivers he loves. You can tell he is a fan by the way he writes about the IMSA series, long before you arrive at the back of the book, where Martin tells of the delight he had interviewing the likes of Bobby Rahal, Bob Tullius and Derek Bell.
TOPIC
By Edward Hotaling | February 6, 2000
ABOVE THE clubhouse entrance to Pimlico Race Course, a huge wall sculpture, serving as a logo for the track, shows three mounted jockeys. But they're in silhouette, so the tens of thousands of people who walk under them every Preakness Day have no idea the middle rider was one of the many great black jockeys who once starred in America's first national pastime. It would be nice if the sculpture could have clearly shown that black jockey, whose name was Will Walker, but who knew? The sculpture is based on a 19th-century engraving that depicted one of the most ballyhooed Baltimore sporting events of all time -- the U.S. House of Representatives adjourned for it -- but even that engraving showed the three jockeys as white.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1999
The piped-in classical music and the banks of TVs showing horse races seemed an odd combination at Laurel Park. But that, racing fans, signals the beginning of the new year at Maryland thoroughbred tracks.The Maryland Jockey Club has completed additional renovations in its effort to upgrade its two racetracks, Pimlico and Laurel Park. Yesterday, track officials welcomed guests in Tycoons, formerly the Silks Cafi, now a lush cigar and brandy room on the first floor of the clubhouse.Tycoons opens tomorrow, the first day of the new year, along with three other betting areas in the clubhouse: two simulcast theaters called Clocker's Corner and Sunny Jim's, and a high-rollers' room as yet unnamed, but which is designed for bettors who will push at least $3,000 through the windows.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1998
The Maryland study commission to aid the horse-racing industry began its second round of hearings yesterday by hanging out a laundry list of racing's problems.The commission will address the list in subsequent meetings before submitting a package of legislative recommendations for helping the thoroughbred and standardbred industries keep pace with tracks in neighboring states that offer slot machines. The commission's next meeting is Dec. 18.Convening at the Lowe House Office Building in Annapolis, the commission set the tone with its first witness: Bruce H. Garland, senior vice president of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1998
Aboard pleasure boats, sailboats, Jet Skis and on shorelines, hillsides and picnic tables, thousands of spectators gathered yesterday for a glimpse of Baltimore's first major league powerboat race.They watched as boats roared by at speeds as high as 100 mph.Baltimore resident Lloyd Stern, 54, arrived at Fort Armistead Park at 6 a.m., first to catch some white perch and then to stake out a site to see the race, which began about 1 p.m. He found his spot atop a picnic table in the park and gazed out over the Patapsco River, just south of the Key Bridge.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
After facing the wrath of hundreds of angry residents at community meetings in Baltimore County and southern Anne Arundel County, racetrack supporters now hoping to put a proposed speedway in Pasadena tried a new approach yesterday: They threw a party.With a markedly different tone than last month's racetrack protest in southern Anne Arundel, 200 auto racing fans from the Baltimore region showed up in good spirits yesterday afternoon at Cactus Cantina, a country and western bar near the Baltimore-Washington International Airport, to look at a race car, win raffle prizes and get organized.
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