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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1998
The Maryland study commission to aid the horse-racing industry began its second round of hearings yesterday by hanging out a laundry list of racing's problems.The commission will address the list in subsequent meetings before submitting a package of legislative recommendations for helping the thoroughbred and standardbred industries keep pace with tracks in neighboring states that offer slot machines. The commission's next meeting is Dec. 18.Convening at the Lowe House Office Building in Annapolis, the commission set the tone with its first witness: Bruce H. Garland, senior vice president of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority.
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SPORTS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
As excited kids clung to fences and people packed grandstands to catch glimpses of IndyCars blurring around the streets of Baltimore, other Grand Prix of Baltimore attendees could be found in unlikely places Sunday. Indoors. Exhausted, they were reclining on chairs in Convention Center nooks, stacked up like cordwood in a downtown sandwich shop and decamped like heat-seared refugees to the orange and blue carpet of the Baltimore Hilton's air-conditioned walkway. "It's a lot cooler in here," said David Allen, 19, of Baltimore County, who sought shelter in the hotel walkway, which stretches to the Convention Center and offered a clear view of the track, sheltered from the heat of the day. The spot came in handy Sunday as temperatures rose into the upper 80s, and humidity hovered around a soupy 66 percent, according to the National Weather Service.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By LORI SEARS | October 6, 2005
If you're a fan of Maryland horseracing, you'll want to be at the Maryland Million at Laurel Park on Saturday. This year marks the 20th anniversary of the racing event, which is restricted to the offspring of Maryland stallions. Racing fans will see Maryland horses compete in 12 races, with purses totaling nearly $1.5 million. In addition to watching the races, visitors can attend an autograph-signing by Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps, watch musical performances by the Marine Corps Marching Band and see the Maryland Million Horse Fair.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
Brad Banker grew up a sports fan outside Green Bay, Wis., but auto racing was not high on his list of passions. His father was a longtime employee of the Packers and Banker, who somehow became a fan of the rival Minnesota Vikings, wound up playing football and lacrosse at Moorhead State in Minnesota. Banker taught for a year after getting his master's, but went into commercial real estate to make a little more money. But it wasn't until Banker got his commercial trucking license and found a job working for Andretti Racing that he finally found his dream job. Starting off driving the team's haulers from stop to stop, Banker eventually got a part-time gig changing tires on pit road and wound up overseeing the team's logistical issues for everything from corporate tents to Port-o-Johns.
SPORTS
By Special to The Sun | November 2, 1991
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- Racing fans will have an opportunity to watch and wager on the entire seven-race, $10 million Breeders' Cup this afternoon as part of a 21-race doubleheader at Charles Town.Post time for the first Breeders' Cup race will be 12:15 p.m.Wagers on the national Pick-7 will be accepted until 12:10 p.m. this afternoon, so patrons are advised to make their wagers early. Admission gates will open at 10:30 a.m., and mutuel windows are scheduled to open at 11:15 a.m.Immediately following the Breeders' Cup races, Charles Town will present simulcasts of the Iroquois and Cardinal stakes, also from Churchill Downs, followed by a live 12-race card.
SPORTS
By Special to The Sun | April 30, 1993
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- Racing fans can watch and wager on the 119th running of the Kentucky Derby tomorrow, when the Charles Town Races presents the race as part of a full-card simulcast-live racing tripleheader.Wagers on the Kentucky Derby will be commingled with those placed at Churchill Downs and numerous other simulcast outlets.Gates for Charles Town's Churchill Downs Derby Day simulcast open at 10:30 a.m., and the first 1,000 fans paying full regular admission will receive a souvenir Kentucky Derby glass.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 20, 1991
LAUREL -- The late Frank De Francis had a knack for knowing what turned racing fans on. Although he was a self-styled king of promotion, De Francis knew that no amount of promotion could top the legitimacy of a race among top-class horses.So when Safely Kept and Housebuster meet for the first time in today's second Frank J. De Francis Memorial Dash at Laurel Race Course, the ideals of De Francis, who died nearly two years ago, will be uppermost in the mind of his son, Joe De Francis."The thing my dad never forgot," said De Francis, who has assumed the legacy of his father as controlling owner and president of Laurel and Pimlico race courses, "was that he was selling horse racing.
NEWS
By Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr | May 15, 2009
Maryland is fortunate to be a state with a long history rich in traditions - including the horse racing industry, which dates back to the Colonial era. The Maryland Jockey Club is almost 250 years old. In 1771, George Washington wrote that he came to Annapolis to watch and bet on the Maryland horse races. Saturday, the Preakness Stakes will be run for the 134th time. As other professional sports have evolved and prospered in our state, we have slowly started to lose this tradition upon which much of our agricultural heritage is founded.
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1996
Before Joe Fonte heads to the racetrack tomorrow, he'll see what they're saying about his horse in cyberspace.Fonte co-owns a horse, "Twice As Special," which will run at Pimlico Friday afternoon. He will arrive at the racetrack with encouraging words for his partners, having found the quickest, most up-to-date predictions about their horse on the World World Web."There are 300 to 400 sites I can probably link to," said Fonte, a 43-year-old computer specialist at Johns Hopkins University's applied physics laboratory.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 27, 1990
LAUREL -- Racing fans can get a quick start from the gate today when Laurel Race Course begins a 15-race program at 10:30 a.m.A live eight-race program, highlighted by the $75,000 Find Handicap, will be followed by simulcasts of the seven Breeders' Cup races. Post time for the first Breeders' Cup event, the Sprint, is 1:55 p.m.On a normal racing day, a showdown in the Find between Master Speaker and Baron de Vaux may have merited considerable attention. Master Speaker might be the best older horse in Maryland and Baron de Vaux the best 3-year-old.
SPORTS
By Ian Duncan and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2013
Race cars whipped around downtown Baltimore on Saturday, turning usually traffic-choked streets into a speedway, their engines filling the air with the sounds of a hornet's hum on the straights and a smoker's cackle at the hairpin turn. As the cars negotiated the two mile course's first turn from Pratt Street onto Light Street during morning warm-ups, spectators lounged in the grandstands or pressed against the barriers, many with cameras in hand trying to freeze the action in a snapshot.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
Construction magnate and self-described "gearhead" Dale Dillon has built offices for high-speed racing teams, laid tracks for IndyCar contests in two cities and, despite having only one leg, raced open-wheeled cars competitively around the country. Now, the Indianapolis-based contractor is poised to become the face of Baltimore's Grand Prix race. He confronts the daunting task of crafting a new image for the racing festival — which drove the previous organizers to financial collapse — and pulling together the massive event in little more than six months.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2011
Inez Alice Chappell, a former Pennsylvania Avenue manicurist and thoroughbred racing fan, died Nov. 2 of heart failure at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital Center. The Northwest Baltimore resident was 86. The daughter of an a-rab and a homemaker, Miss Chappell was born and raised in West Baltimore and Harlem Park. She was a 1943 graduate of the old Frederick Douglass High School and Cortez Peters Business School. For more than two decades, Miss Chappell worked as a manicurist at Pennsylvania Avenue barbershops.
NEWS
September 6, 2011
One can only hope that crow tastes like chicken, because after the success of the Baltimore Grand Prix, there are a number of people dining on it this week. That may even include, gentle reader, the members of this newspaper's editorial board who, along with many letter writers, publicly pouted about the inconveniences and controversies imposed by the three-day event. "It had better be worth it," was one of our snappier headlines. So let's take the inventory. The turnout of spectators was greater than promised - as high as 160,000 over Labor Day weekend, though the numbers are a little soft given the inexact accounting of tickets.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | July 20, 2011
While Baltimore gets all gussied up for its IndyCar debut on Labor Day weekend, the people who have turned NASCAR into America's favorite motorsport want you to know that they love Charm City, too. That's why NASCAR driver Kenny Wallace was acting as an impromptu tour director on the Annapolitan II in the Inner Harbor on Tuesday morning, entertaining a boatload of racing fans with his North Carolina drawl and his admittedly limited knowledge of...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2011
Selling racegoers on the Preakness Stakes has been a tricky balancing act in the past few years. The Maryland Jockey Club struck out in 2009 when it ended the bring-your-own-beer policy in the infield, driving away thousands of young people. It won many of them back last year with the suggestive "Get Your Preak On" campaign, but upset the more traditional fans of horse racing. This year, race organizers have embarked on a delicate strategy to appeal to the race's rowdy and refined fans alike — and it seems to have paid off, with organizers expecting the biggest crowd since 2007.
SPORTS
May 14, 1991
Response in poor taste* In the article on the possible names for the new stadium, a writer [actually an "It's Your Call" respondent] made a comment in poor taste about the late Thurman Munson. It's fine to have disliked him for being a Yankee, but no fan should ever forget the skill and chutzpah Thurman brought to the game. In this era of crybaby, overprotected players, the game of baseball could use more players like Thurman Munson. The public's memory may be short, but I remember Thurman and I miss him.Kevin Campbell Royal OakRev up racing coverage* I am an auto racing fan who just moved to this area.
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