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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2011
The thoroughbred industry missed Thursday's deadline to submit a long-term business plan to sustain the sport to the Maryland General Assembly. A state law enacted earlier this year to provide slot subsidies to the state's struggling racetracks called for the sport's stakeholders — including track operators, horse owners and breeders — to craft a plan that would maintain year-round racing without slots at a racetrack. Joseph Bryce, Gov. Martin O'Malley's top legislative aide, who has been keeping track of the discussions, said a plan would be provided when talks on the industry's future and a deal for next year's racing dates are completed.
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BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
Maryland's thoroughbred horse racing tracks and the state's horsemen are close to agreement on a 10-year deal that would give the industry stability it has not seen in decades, those involved in the negotiations say. "We've had years of not knowing what the future would hold," said Alan Foreman, the lawyer for the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association. "But now we're running for historic levels of purse money and are on the cusp of an unprecedented revenue-sharing agreement with the track operator.
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SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1996
The Maryland Racing Commission yesterday routinely approved the state's thoroughbred tracks' racing dates next year without addressing the possibility of a 30-day summer meeting in Virginia.Maryland Jockey Club president Joe De Francis has said he will conduct simulcast-only racing at Laurel Park and Pimlico if Colonial Downs, currently under construction in New Kent County, Va., is ready to operate by the target date of June 29.De Francis' group is under contract to manage the thoroughbreds at the Virginia plant whenever it opens.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2011
The thoroughbred industry missed Thursday's deadline to submit a long-term business plan to sustain the sport to the Maryland General Assembly. A state law enacted earlier this year to provide slot subsidies to the state's struggling racetracks called for the sport's stakeholders — including track operators, horse owners and breeders — to craft a plan that would maintain year-round racing without slots at a racetrack. Joseph Bryce, Gov. Martin O'Malley's top legislative aide, who has been keeping track of the discussions, said a plan would be provided when talks on the industry's future and a deal for next year's racing dates are completed.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE and SANDRA MCKEE,SUN REPORTER | November 5, 2005
Lou Raffetto, chief operating officer of the Maryland Jockey Club, said yesterday he believes horsemen and Magna Entertainment Corp., which owns Maryland's thoroughbred racetracks, will reach an agreement by December on racing dates. But not everyone is quite so optimistic. "We are making a general request for dates at this November meeting and then will ask for specific dates for Laurel and/or Pimlico at the December meeting," Raffetto said. "I think we will reach a compromise on the number of days at between 170 and 180."
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE and SANDRA MCKEE,SUN REPORTER | December 22, 2005
The Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association did not accept the latest compromise proposal from Magna Entertainment Corp. last night, leaving a deal on 2006 racing dates unresolved. Magna, owner of Laurel Park and Pimlico Race Course, offered a plan featuring 180 days of live racing, year-round stabling and a request for substantial contributions to help cover operating costs. Last night, MTHA president Richard Hoffberger said his board accepted the 180 days, but wants to run locally during the summer months when the Maryland Jockey Club would rather keep its doors closed because of increased competition from operations in surrounding states.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2001
Exasperated by the racing industry's continued bickering and failure to work together, the Maryland Racing Commission yesterday ordered the thoroughbred and harness segments to resolve conflicts in two weeks or face punitive action that could lead to the denial of racing dates. Animosity among the disparate factions, long simmering in private, boiled over into public view at the commission's monthly meeting at Laurel Park. Toward the end of the contentious gathering, the commissioner Terry Saxon said that it would be "absolute folly" to continue discussions as long as the parties were so divided in their viewpoints.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | May 2, 2006
Magna Entertainment Corp., the publicly held Canadian company that owns Laurel Park, Pimlico Race Course and the Preakness Stakes, reported a first-quarter profit of more than $2.2 million, worth 2 cents a share. Last year for the same period, Magna Entertainment lost 4 cents a share, with the results restated to exclude performance of discontinued operations. Company chairman and interim CEO Frank Stronach said that it was Magna Entertainment's first quarter with net income since the first quarter of 2004 and that it marked the third consecutive quarterly improvement over the previous year's comparative period.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1998
Pettit's Quest out-gamed Red Star Rose on the outside in a rally to the wire yesterday and won the $60,000 Rollicking Stakes by a neck at Laurel Park.In the process, both beat the heavy favorite, 2-to-5 Cayman Cat, in the seven-furlong test, which is restricted to Maryland-bred 2-year-olds.Cayman Cat finished third, a half-length behind Red Star Rose.It was the first stakes victory for talented apprentice jockey Jozbin Santana."I was a little nervous because we had horses all round us," Santana recalled after the race.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE and SANDRA MCKEE,SUN REPORTER | November 8, 2005
All sides in the negotiations over Maryland horse racing dates for the coming year said they expect today's state racing commission meeting to be a quiet one. Lou Raffetto, chief operating officer of the Maryland Jockey Club, said again yesterday that he will simply ask for all the available racing dates next year, with the idea of coming back next month with specific date requests after an agreement is reached with the state's horsemen. "We all get along," Raffetto said. "We're all on the same page.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
Maryland horsemen learned Monday afternoon they'd have to wait longer for a definitive answer on the state's racing dates for the 2012 season. "We've had productive meetings," said John McDaniel, a member of the Maryland Racing Commission who has spearheaded the discussions. "Both parties have entered the dialogue with desire to reach an agreement. " But no agreement has been reached, and the Maryland Jockey Club has not put in a request for any racing dates. Tracks often ask for 365 days as a way to meet the Dec. 1 deadline and request specific live dates later.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
Live horse racing is back after the Maryland Racing Commission approved racing dates for both the Timonium Fair Grounds race track and Laurel Park on Friday. Timonium will open for the Maryland State Fair meet Aug. 26, which will be the first live racing in the state since Preakness Day in May. The Laurel Park meet begins Sept. 9, with racing expanded to five days a week in October. The Frank J. De Francis Memorial Dash - an elite six-furlong sprint that lost its graded status after not being run last year - will return, as will a pair of historic stakes for 2-year-olds, the Laurel Futurity and Selima Stakes.
NEWS
December 1, 2010
The Maryland Racing Commission and the horse community are right: The Maryland Jockey Club, MI Development and Penn National have no commitment to racing ( "Preakness at risk," Dec. 1). MID, a real estate firm, just wants to commercially develop Laurel Park. Penn National just wants to protect its casino at Charles Town and maybe get another casino by threatening to end Maryland racing. Success at Laurel would threaten these interests, so no wonder it is failing. Racing dates belong to the state.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,bill.ordine@baltsun.com | March 11, 2009
Racing at Pimlico Race Course, the historic home of the Preakness Stakes, will be reduced to 20 dates this spring, the Maryland Jockey Club announced yesterday. Falling revenues during Laurel Park's winter meet have created a $2 million shortfall in the purse account, the pool of money that is used to pay top finishers. As a result, the MJC and the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association have agreed to trim race dates at Pimlico from the scheduled 31 days to 20, with the meet beginning April 18 and ending May 23. The Preakness, the second jewel in racing's Triple Crown, is May 16. By reducing the number of race dates, the track and the horsemen hope to keep the purses at $160,000 a day, not including stakes races such as the Preakness.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE and SANDRA MCKEE,SUN REPORTER | June 14, 2006
CAMBRIDGE -- The Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association and the Maryland Jockey Club have reached agreement on racing dates for the rest of this year and for all of 2007 as well. Included in the agreement, approved yesterday at the Maryland Racing Commission's monthly meeting, are eight racing days at Laurel Park beginning Aug. 16, and not fewer than 10 days at Laurel Park in August 2007. "That was very important to the horsemen," said Wayne Wright, executive secretary of the MTHA.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | May 2, 2006
Magna Entertainment Corp., the publicly held Canadian company that owns Laurel Park, Pimlico Race Course and the Preakness Stakes, reported a first-quarter profit of more than $2.2 million, worth 2 cents a share. Last year for the same period, Magna Entertainment lost 4 cents a share, with the results restated to exclude performance of discontinued operations. Company chairman and interim CEO Frank Stronach said that it was Magna Entertainment's first quarter with net income since the first quarter of 2004 and that it marked the third consecutive quarterly improvement over the previous year's comparative period.
SPORTS
By Los Angeles Times | January 3, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Santa Anita Park, as recently as early 1990, entered into secret discussions with a board member of Hollywood Park that would have led to the elimination of racing at the Inglewood, Calif., track and the transfer of most of those dates to Santa Anita.Santa Anita went so far as to commission a major study that included a map of Hollywood Park property to be sold and the redistribution of racing dates.Information about the plan was obtained by the Times through court documents and depositions filed in conjunction with the Hollywood Park takeover attempt by R.D. Hubbard, owner of racetracks in New Mexico and Kansas.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE and SANDRA MCKEE,SUN REPORTER | December 9, 2005
Another Maryland Racing Commission meeting is on the horizon at Laurel Park. But even though the commission directed Magna Entertainment Corp., horsemen and breeders to resolve their differences over expense sharing and racing dates for 2006 by Tuesday's meeting, it is unlikely anything will be settled by then. Even the commission is backing off its promise to settle the issues, "if a timely agreement" is not at hand. "The clout we have is only punitive," said commissioner John Franzone.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE and SANDRA MCKEE,SUN REPORTER | December 22, 2005
The Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association did not accept the latest compromise proposal from Magna Entertainment Corp. last night, leaving a deal on 2006 racing dates unresolved. Magna, owner of Laurel Park and Pimlico Race Course, offered a plan featuring 180 days of live racing, year-round stabling and a request for substantial contributions to help cover operating costs. Last night, MTHA president Richard Hoffberger said his board accepted the 180 days, but wants to run locally during the summer months when the Maryland Jockey Club would rather keep its doors closed because of increased competition from operations in surrounding states.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE | December 21, 2005
Billy Boniface, president of the Maryland Horse Breeders Association, said members of the MHBA board would have nothing to say on their actions during a meeting yesterday to consider the latest proposal by the Maryland Jockey Club for 2006 racing until after the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association meeting today. "I don't want to say anything until after the MTHA votes," said Boniface. "I think every side realizes we have to give and take to get this done to move on to the more important issues facing us in Annapolis [slots legislation]
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