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Racial Slurs

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By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | June 21, 1994
A Baltimore radio station has rallied behind a man who says pTC he was fired from his job at Alcon Labs Inc. in Savage last month for listening to a broadcast on the station's morning show that used racial slurs.The disc jockeys on WIYY 98 Rock's Grego and Mo Show also are calling for its listeners to boycott Alcon's contact lens products to protest the dismissal of Nunzio Bonaccorsy, 30, of Annapolis.In addition, they have asked listeners to write letters to Alcon's factory and warehouse in Savage and to the company's headquarters in Fort Worth, Texas, to complain about the firing.
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SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
The NFL is considering adopting a rule where players would be penalized for using language that crosses the line. Specifically, the language initiative would penalize players to get them to stop using the N word on the field. A 15-yard penalty would likely be the punishment for a first offense and an ejection for someone who does it twice in a game. John Wooten, the chairman of the Fritz Pollard Alliance that promotes diversity for NFL job searches, has been advocating for the rule to be added.
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NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2000
Baltimore County police are investigating what they believe were two unrelated instances in which racial slurs were painted on schools on the county's east side during the weekend. Police said they were called to the 400 block of 51st St. about 6:30 a.m. yesterday by a custodian who saw two men running away from Colgate Elementary School carrying spray cans. When officers arrived, they discovered freshly painted racial slurs and names on the school sidewalk and wall, said Cpl. Vickie Warehime, a county police spokeswoman.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
When Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith reported to his first training camp two years ago, he anticipated being hazed by veteran teammates. He had heard the stories and watched shows like HBO's "Hard Knocks" that glorified the behavior and was prepared to be rudely welcomed to the NFL. But to his surprise, the rookies were welcomed by leaders like Ray Lewis, Ed Reed and Terrell Suggs, who made it clear that the team had more important things to...
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1996
A white Baltimore police officer faces a suspension hearing today in the wake of charges that while off duty early Saturday, he beat up a black man outside a waterfront bar while shouting racial slurs.Officer Richard Heymann, 25, who has been on the force for nearly four years, was charged in a criminal summons Tuesday with battery and racial harassment and ordered to stand trial June 18.The victim, O'Dell John Lewis of Columbia, suffered a fractured right eye socket and a possible concussion and might undergo surgery.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1998
A Western Maryland College student who claimed to be a victim of racial slurs -- scrawled on the doors of two dormitory rooms -- wrote them himself, Westminster police said yesterday.No charges will be filed against Kenneth M. Carter III, 18, a freshman from Baltimore, said Lt. Dean Brewer of the Westminster city police. Carter will face the college's disciplinary process, Brewer said.Carter left campus with his parents yesterday afternoon, according to friends. He could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1998
Baltimore City Councilman Bernard C. "Jack" Young left a public hearing last night disappointed for two reasons.First, his bill to prohibit the use of city money to buy reference books that contain racial slurs drew opposition from the city solicitor, the school board and the city's Office of Community Relations.Second, only one person showed up to talk about it -- and she opposed it.Young's bill would prohibit using city money to purchase reference books and materials for schools and libraries that contain any words "commonly understood to be racial epithets or racial slurs."
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Donna R. Engle and Brenda J. Buote and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1998
Just weeks before an African-American woman was scheduled to move into her first house, built in Taneytown with the help of an interfaith group, vandals marred its walls and appliances with racial and pornographic slurs.Karen Magruder, 29, said yesterday she discovered the damage about 1 p.m. Monday. She had gone to the house in the 200 block of Maryland Ave. with her three children and a friend to complete a few finishing touches before moving in."At first I was surprised and shocked. Then I was numb for a while," said Magruder, who spent about eight months building the four-bedroom colonial with the help of Interfaith Housing of Western Maryland Inc., a nonprofit group with 17 affordable housing projects from Garrett to Carroll counties.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
Howard County racked up two more hate incidents over the holiday weekend when a racial epithet was spray-painted on a sign at River Hill High School and a swastika was smeared in chocolate on a home in Columbia's Kings Contrivance village.The two incidents come as the Howard County police and nine organizations and businesses, including the Rouse Co., the county schools and the Columbia Association announced a campaign yesterday to crack down on vandalism and graffiti.The goal of the campaign is to display posters in schools, buildings and parks depicting graffiti as a crime.
NEWS
By Michael deCourcy Hinds and Michael deCourcy Hinds,New York Times News Service | May 15, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- Amid preparations for Monday's commencement exercises, University of Pennsylvania officials spent much of yesterday dealing with the racial tension that has plagued the campus over the last semester.The university's Judicial Inquiry Office held a closed hearing yesterday to determine whether a white student who had called some black students "water buffalo" had violated the university's policy forbidding racial harassment. The policy prohibits racial epithets meant to "inflict direct injury" on people.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2012
An Anne Arundel county councilman was peppered with questions Saturday about diversity on the all-white, all-male council — and criticized for his public use of a racial slur — before storming out of a community forum in Odenton. Richard B. "Dick" Ladd, a Broadneck Republican, was the only councilman to attend the discussion on local government, sponsored by a historically black sorority. His appearance came as the council is deadlocked between two candidates — one white and one black — to replace a member who is serving a prison term.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
Anne Arundel County activists plan to publicly denounce on Monday "a climate of insensitivity and intolerance" that members of the Anne Arundel County Council have fostered, an Annapolis civil rights leader wrote Saturday. "We have seen racially insensitive comments made by some members of the County Council and now is the time to publicly express our dissatisfaction," wrote Carl O. Snowden, director of the state attorney general's Office of Civil Rights, in an email to activists.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
A fire accompanied by racial graffiti at a Brooklyn Park home early New Year's Day is being investigated as a possible hate crime, according to Anne Arundel County police and fire officials. Fire Department Lt. Cliff Kooser said the blaze at the house in the 300 block of Church Street caused an estimated $75,000 in damage, and that "it's a possibility it could be incendiary. " Kooser and police spokesman Justin Mulcahy said the graffiti was on walls and the agencies were working together to determine if it was a hate crime.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | March 25, 2010
A bout two weeks ago, I was waiting in a "Seven items or fewer" line at Wegmans in Hunt Valley. The woman in front of me had 18 separate items and a variety of difficulties in finding the money in her purse to pay for them. She was waited on for more than seven minutes. After she was finished paying, I said to the person at the register, "Do you all not discourage people who have so many items from using this line? It really is bad policy." The woman who took 18 items to the seven-item limit line was still within earshot and said, "Mind your own business.
NEWS
By Childs Walker | childs.walker@baltsun.com | March 2, 2010
A Towson University adjunct professor was fired last week after using a racially insensitive term in his art class. Allen Zaruba, a local artist who had taught at Towson for 12 years, said he was discussing provocative works depicted in textbook chapters on the body and identity when he used the term. "I crossed the line," he said. "I made a terrible, terrible mistake." Zaruba, who is white, said his black stepfather used racial terms freely and that "I never quite got the horror of the word."
NEWS
March 2, 2010
Maryland State Police have been under considerable scrutiny over matters of race relations over the years. Racial profiling in traffic stops is just one example. Despite the agency's decision to abandon the practice, allegations of "driving while black" incidents still pop up regularly. Just last month, the state agency was ordered by the Maryland Court of Special Appeals to turn over to the NAACP records showing how troopers have dealt internally with allegations of racial profiling.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2004
A Mount Airy man was sentenced yesterday to a year in the Carroll County Detention Center for violating Maryland's hate-crimes law by spray-painting racial slurs on a house. Justin Eugene Wright, 20, of the 200 block of Watersville Road, was also given three years of probation when he was sentenced in Carroll County Circuit Court by retired Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. Wright was arrested in September and charged with nine counts of malicious destruction of property and one count of racial or religious harassment for the defacement of several signs and homes, a sidewalk and a car in the Mount Airy neighborhood of Friendly Acres.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Hanah Cho and Athima Chansanchai and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2003
A McDaniel College dean is promising that the school's judicial system will consider disciplinary action for a "disturbing incident" that began with racial slurs and ended with one student hospitalized. Campus officials and Westminster police are investigating a fight that broke out at the Westminster school after a charter bus trip to a Baltimore nightclub. Westminster police say they are investigating the matter as a hate crime. "I don't think any student should be subjected to verbal abuse," Philip Sayre, the college's dean of student affairs, said yesterday.
SPORTS
By From Sun staff and news services | September 26, 2009
Varsity State adds code of conduct addressing race-baiting Maryland high school athletes have a new code of conduct, prompted by allegations that football players in Cumberland used racial slurs against opposing players during a game last year. Race-baiting was already forbidden but "maybe it doesn't hurt to say so" in the student-athlete handbook, Ned Sparks, executive director of the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association, said Friday. He said the code was added this school year to a "Respect the Game" handbook that is distributed annually to the 4,800 team captains in the association's 192 member schools.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
When Jeffrey Morse resigned from the Carroll County school board in May amid the outcry that followed his use of a racial slur, he had no intention of ever running for another term. But now the Silver Run resident is trying to make his way back, one of four candidates vying for two spots in Tuesday's election. Among the other candidates is Virginia Harrison of Sykesville, who was appointed by the governor to finish Morse's term. Harrison is running as a write-in candidate. "I had time in the summer to spend with my family and we gave it a lot more though and discussion," Morse said.
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