Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRacial Problems
IN THE NEWS

Racial Problems

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | November 30, 1999
It is natural for Kurt L. Schmoke to unleash a few emotions now. He leaves City Hall after 12 embattled winters and hears the same mutterings as everyone else: These were years of disappointment. The city's troubles did not go away. One man's impressive background did not add up to a community's renaissance.He hears these sentiments, and they must deflate and depress him. He ends his mayoral days rushing to the scene of yet another young black man shot to death on a street corner, and listens to the reflex cries of police brutality.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By GWINN OWENS | July 9, 2003
WINTHROP P. BAKER Jr., who died June 7 at age 72, was a broadcast executive who, during his Baltimore tenure, brought glory to local television. WJZ-TV was then an affiliate of ABC, but it was owned by the uniquely enlightened Westinghouse Broadcasting Co., which then called its TV stations Group W. In 1964, WJZ won the Alfred I. duPont Award for Broadcast Journalism, specifically for news, editorials and public affairs programs. This is the closest a station can come to being officially called the best in America.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Donna R. Engle and Brenda J. Buote and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Mary Gail Hare contributed to this article | October 9, 1998
Residents of Taneytown expressed mixed reactions yesterday to news that the home of an African-American woman had been marred by pornographic and racial graffiti, in an incident the FBI is investigating as a hate crime.In dozens of interviews yesterday, ministers and merchants, police officers and longtime residents insisted this town of about 4,700 has no racial problems, though many said they are aware of recent Ku Klux Klan activity in the area."In our congregation, we have people who are African-American and Hispanic, and nothing's happened to them," said the Rev. Martin P. Feild, pastor of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2001
Carroll County Sheriff Kenneth L. Tregoning pledged yesterday to work with the local chapter of the NAACP to "maintain a work environment free of adversity," after meeting with the group's president to discuss inappropriate racial remarks made by a correctional officer and the warden of the county detention center. "We're going to continue to do what we've done in the past, which is to provide training to all employees and to make sure that cultural diversity and sensitivity is part of our training," Tregoning said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1997
Even as Carroll County's Human Relations Commission strives for racial harmony locally, county officials are ignoring a metrowide effort to end racism."
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Donna R. Engle and Brenda J. Buote and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Mary Gail Hare contributed to this article | October 9, 1998
Residents of Taneytown expressed mixed reactions yesterday to news that the home of an African-American woman had been marred by pornographic and racial graffiti, in an incident the FBI is investigating as a hate crime.In dozens of interviews yesterday, ministers and merchants, police officers and longtime residents insisted this town of about 4,700 has no racial problems, though many said they are aware of recent Ku Klux Klan activity in the area."In our congregation, we have people who are African-American and Hispanic, and nothing's happened to them," said the Rev. Martin P. Feild, pastor of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
Local black leaders have been holding meetings with officials of Howard County General Hospital to address what they call mounting racial problems at the Columbia hospital.The meetings, which began about two months ago, have come amid claims of racial tension among hospital staff members at all levels.In more than a dozen recent interviews with The Sun, former and current doctors, nurses and administrators -- black and white -- charge that minority employees consistently are barred from positions of authority, including managerial posts and committee appointments.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
Local black leaders have been holding meetings with officials of Howard County General Hospital to address what they call mounting racial problems at the Columbia hospital.The continuing series of meetings, which began about two months ago, have come amid claims of racial tension among staff members at all levels.In more than a dozen recent interviews with The Sun, former and current doctors, nurses and administrators -- black and white -- charge that minority employees consistently are barred from positions of authority at the hospital, including managerial posts and committee appointments.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | July 29, 1993
Jessica Peddicord, 6, of the predominantly white Hampden community in north Baltimore, has some black classmates at her school but doesn't know any of them well.Ife Semper, 7, who lives in West Baltimore's predominantly black Walbrook neighborhood, knows a few white children but hasn't visited their houses or invited them to visit hers.Asked why they don't socialize with kids of other races, both girls shrugged and failed to offer answers.But today, the girls will be part of an effort to promote racial harmony in the city.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | March 14, 1991
Mayor Kurt Schmoke, seeking straight talk on race relations in Hampden, got an earful from students at Robert Poole Middle School."A lot of kids and their parents are for the white race . . . and they don't want any black people around here," said a white girl, one of 18 students in a free-wheeling discussion with the mayor yesterday."
FEATURES
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 27, 2001
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The doorbell rings at the home of Madam Gwen, but Eve, the black maid, refuses to answer it. This act of defiance spells trouble for plump and proper Madam, who idles away her day while her domestic servants do all the chores. Madam reluctantly pulls herself up from the sofa and opens the door. "I don't think I've ever seen you answer the door before," says the startled visitor, a neighbor. "I wouldn't let Eve have time off to see her Uncle Joe, so now she's getting back at me," says Madam.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | January 22, 2000
Check the news, and there is progress. On the surface, there is always progress. Michael Jordan reportedly could become a 20 percent owner of the Washington Wizards, making him the largest African-American shareholder in an NBA franchise. Tampa Bay's Shaun King and Tennessee's Steve McNair could become the first pair of African- American quarterbacks to start a Super Bowl, and Tampa Bay's Tony Dungy could become the first African-American to coach in one. Progress. Undeniable progress.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | November 30, 1999
It is natural for Kurt L. Schmoke to unleash a few emotions now. He leaves City Hall after 12 embattled winters and hears the same mutterings as everyone else: These were years of disappointment. The city's troubles did not go away. One man's impressive background did not add up to a community's renaissance.He hears these sentiments, and they must deflate and depress him. He ends his mayoral days rushing to the scene of yet another young black man shot to death on a street corner, and listens to the reflex cries of police brutality.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Donna R. Engle and Brenda J. Buote and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Mary Gail Hare contributed to this article | October 9, 1998
Residents of Taneytown expressed mixed reactions yesterday to news that the home of an African-American woman had been marred by pornographic and racial graffiti, in an incident the FBI is investigating as a hate crime.In dozens of interviews yesterday, ministers and merchants, police officers and longtime residents insisted this town of about 4,700 has no racial problems, though many said they are aware of recent Ku Klux Klan activity in the area."In our congregation, we have people who are African-American and Hispanic, and nothing's happened to them," said the Rev. Martin P. Feild, pastor of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Donna R. Engle and Brenda J. Buote and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Mary Gail Hare contributed to this article | October 9, 1998
Residents of Taneytown expressed mixed reactions yesterday to news that the home of an African-American woman had been marred by pornographic and racial graffiti, in an incident the FBI is investigating as a hate crime.In dozens of interviews yesterday, ministers and merchants, police officers and longtime residents insisted this town of about 4,700 has no racial problems, though many said they are aware of recent Ku Klux Klan activity in the area."In our congregation, we have people who are African-American and Hispanic, and nothing's happened to them," said the Rev. Martin P. Feild, pastor of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
By Roger Wilkins | March 8, 1998
FAIRFAX, Va. -- In the days since the election of Julian Bond as national chairman of the NAACP board of directors, I have been asked repeatedly whether the organization had imploded -- as it appeared it was going to do under the leadership of Dr. William F. Gibson and the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis a few years ago.It has an almost 90-year tradition of struggle for justice, a network of 2,200 local branches across the country and almost 500,000 active members.That...
NEWS
By Roger Wilkins | March 8, 1998
FAIRFAX, Va. -- In the days since the election of Julian Bond as national chairman of the NAACP board of directors, I have been asked repeatedly whether the organization had imploded -- as it appeared it was going to do under the leadership of Dr. William F. Gibson and the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis a few years ago.It has an almost 90-year tradition of struggle for justice, a network of 2,200 local branches across the country and almost 500,000 active members.That...
NEWS
By GWINN OWENS | July 9, 2003
WINTHROP P. BAKER Jr., who died June 7 at age 72, was a broadcast executive who, during his Baltimore tenure, brought glory to local television. WJZ-TV was then an affiliate of ABC, but it was owned by the uniquely enlightened Westinghouse Broadcasting Co., which then called its TV stations Group W. In 1964, WJZ won the Alfred I. duPont Award for Broadcast Journalism, specifically for news, editorials and public affairs programs. This is the closest a station can come to being officially called the best in America.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1998
The U.S. Justice Department has opened an investigation of alleged discrimination in Baltimore County's Fire Department amid complaints by black firefighters and the NAACP that their concerns have been ignored.County officials confirmed the inquiry this week, even as they acknowledged a lack of progress on race relations within the 1,100-member department, including former Chief Paul H. Reincke's telling a racially offensive joke to four white fire officials in late 1996.The joke -- which Reincke has admitted telling in his office -- was widely circulated and was seen by black firefighters and officers as symptomatic of racial attitudes they had complained about for years.
NEWS
June 20, 1997
Fighting crimes through word of GodThank you for publishing the May 19 article about Will Craig, a minister who raised money to lease billboard space in high-crime spots in Baltimore. The billboards read, "Thou Shalt Not Kill, Exodus 20: 13" and included a challenge, "Look it up."Interest has grown, thanks to the good write-up your paper provided.The city has tried so many ways to stop the senseless killing. Isn't it time to try the word of God?Sharon MagerPasadenaGilman not about student hairstylesWhat a glorious day for the Gilman School community, especially the 1997 graduates.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.