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By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun Carl M. Cannon and Sarah Lindenfeld of the Washington Bureau contributed to this article | June 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, saying it has let the federal government go too far with affirmative action, ruled 5-4 yesterday that national programs based on race must satisfy the toughest constitutional test or be struck down.In one of its most important decisions on the issue since it first allowed a racial preference 17 years ago, the court declared that Congress and federal agencies may use race-based benefits only as a last resort, and only when needed to meet "compelling" policy needs.
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NEWS
By Clarence Page | December 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Affirmative action is on trial at the U.S. Supreme Court. Judging by the chilly reception that five of the nine justices gave it during oral arguments this week, the only question left is how far the court will go in overruling racial preferences as a constitutional way to remedy the historical damage done by racial preferences. I do not use the P-word lightly. I have publicly debated former University of California regent Ward Connerly and others who use the word "preferences" to denounce any effort by government to remedy the historical problems of race by taking race into account.
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NEWS
By David Holahan | September 9, 1991
REFLECTIONS OF AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION BABY. By Stephen L. Carter. Basic Books. 296 pages. $23. TO BE white and conservative is to be part of the American mainstream," writes Stephen L. Carter, a black Yale Law School professor. He adds, "To be black and conservative is to be part of the lunatic fringe." The author, who insists his political beliefs are far too diverse to label (as some have) "neoconservative," is clearly not happy with this situation.If not a conservative, neo or otherwise, Carter is clearly an accomplished intellectual (whose prose is mercifully free of jargon and eminently readable)
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | August 11, 2006
The Naval Academy yesterday announced it will change its application for sponsors, Annapolis-area residents who host midshipmen in their homes, after complaints from the local chapter of the NAACP that it encouraged racial division. No longer will the online form ask potential sponsors to state racial and religious preferences they have for the midshipmen who come to them for home-cooked food, a ride to the mall or a couch to crash on. Sponsors can still opt for a midshipman of a particular gender or for one involved in a particular activity.
NEWS
BY SUN STAFF WRITERS | June 24, 2003
Yesterday's Supreme Court rulings on admissions practices at the University of Michigan produced reactions as mixed as the opinions, but this much was agreed on: Racial preferences in higher education have survived their toughest challenge in years. At campuses in Maryland and around the country, college officials said the two rulings would allow them to leave intact policies that take race into account as a factor in their schools' admissions decisions. "We've been wondering why the weather's been so cold: It's because Christmas was coming in June," said Larry S. Gibson, a professor and admissions committee member at the University of Maryland School of Law. "This is the first time the court has unambiguously said affirmative action is constitutional, that diversity is a compelling state interest, and that affirmative action can be used to achieve it."
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | April 22, 1998
EVER since California's two top public universities released figures showing a dramatic drop in black and Hispanic enrollment in the wake of the state's ban on racial preferences, commentators have been wringing their hands about the unfairness of it all. But at least one opponent of racial preferences has not been scared off by the brouhaha -- Rep. Frank Riggs, R-Calif., who has announced plans to introduce a federal law to bar colleges that receive federal funds from using racial preferences to admit students.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Carl M. Cannon contributed to this article | June 6, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration moved yesterday to avoid defending its policies in favor of racial preferences in a Supreme Court test case that has come to symbolize the national debate on affirmative action.Apparently worried that the argument for affirmative action could fail in this case, thus dampening efforts to make society more racially diverse, the administration asked the justices not to hear a dispute from Piscataway, N.J.The dispute arose in 1989, when a white high school teacher was laid off in order to save the job of a black teacher.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2003
PRINCESS ANNE M-y Sitting on a bench on the bucolic campus of the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore, sophomore Jodi Ann Gordon didnM-Ft hesitate when asked why she had come to a historically black college. "I personally wouldn't go to a predominantly white college." said the African-American student from Hartford, Conn. "It's a comfort-level thing." That sentiment, a fairly common one at UMES, is now at is sue in the landmark affirmative action case before the U.S. Supreme Court. In an unlikely twist, opponents of racial preferences in college admissions have seized on historically black colleges to help make their argument against affirmative action.
NEWS
March 30, 1995
RICHARD Kahlenberg, writing on affirmative action in The New Republic:Why should liberals push for class preferences at all? Why not just provide more funding for education, safer schools, better nutrition? The answer is that liberals should do these things, but we cannot hold our breath for it to happen. In 1993, when all the planets were aligned -- a populist Democratic president, Democratic control of both houses of Congress -- they produced what the New York Times called "A Budget Worthy of Mr. Bush."
NEWS
By George F. Will | September 8, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Jesse Jackson's Niagara of ill-chosen words in defense of racial preferences in California and against the truncation of self-government in the District of Columbia echo episodes in American history.In November 1996 California's electorate passed Proposition 209, banning racial preferences by governmental agencies. Then for 10 months opponents of 209 tried to get courts to block this result of direct democracy. They argued that a ban on unequal treatment of the races under a system of preferences violates the constitutional guarantee of equal protection of the laws.
NEWS
By HOWARD ALTSTEIN | January 25, 2006
In 2002, the last year for which there are national statistics, 300,000 women between the ages of 18 to 44 were seeking to adopt a child and had taken specific measures to do so. It's not surprising that about half of the women preferred a single non-disabled child under the age of two. What is significant are the racial preferences of these black and white women toward the race of any future adopted child. Eighty-four percent of white women seeking to adopt would "prefer or accept" an African-American child as compared with 75 percent of African-American women who would "prefer or accept" a white child, a difference of only 9 percentage points.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 4, 2004
HEY, DON'T shoot the messenger. I couldn't make this stuff up. But you just have to hear some of the names being bandied about as to who should be the next president and chief executive officer of the NAACP now that Kweisi Mfume has resigned effective Jan. 1 of next year. Don't you pine away for those days when what was then called the NAACP's executive secretary was selected from someone who had toiled anonymously but effectively within the organization for years? But the era when a James Weldon Johnson would be replaced by a Walter White, who would be replaced by a Roy Wilkins, seems long gone.
NEWS
By Stuart Silverstein and Stuart Silverstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Law professor Richard H. Sander, author of a new study concluding that affirmative action hurts black law school students, generally seems an unlikely candidate to challenge a leading liberal cause. Sander, 48, is a soft-spoken former VISTA volunteer who for years has studied housing discrimination and championed efforts to fight segregation in Los Angeles. A self-described "pragmatic progressive" who supported Sen. John Kerry for president, the UCLA professor also promoted a local program in the 1990s to help the working poor win more federal aid. Yet Sander's latest research, to be published soon in the Stanford Law Review, is drawing widespread criticism from liberal backers of affirmative action and is roiling law schools around the country.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane and Gregory Kane,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2003
NOW THAT the Supreme Court has handed down the decision in the University of Michigan affirmative action cases, perhaps the demagoguery can stop. During the months leading up to the June 23 decision, some in the pro-racial preference camp did not have their better moments. Notice the use of "racial preference camp" instead of "affirmative action" supporters. The affirmative action described in President Johnson's Executive Order 11246, issued on Sept. 28, 1965, specifically said things were to be done without regard to race.
NEWS
By Steven Lubet | June 25, 2003
SUPPORTERS OF affirmative action are cheering the Supreme Court's set of decisions in two cases from the University of Michigan on Monday that seem to endorse the limited use of racial preferences in university admissions. Unfortunately, the practical result may be nearly the opposite as the court's ruling contains a virtual road map for years of continuing litigation in which many affirmative action programs are very likely to lose. In Grutter vs. Bollinger, the court approved the University of Michigan law school's "holistic" use of racial preferences because they guaranteed each applicant a "highly individualized" review.
NEWS
BY SUN STAFF WRITERS | June 24, 2003
Yesterday's Supreme Court rulings on admissions practices at the University of Michigan produced reactions as mixed as the opinions, but this much was agreed on: Racial preferences in higher education have survived their toughest challenge in years. At campuses in Maryland and around the country, college officials said the two rulings would allow them to leave intact policies that take race into account as a factor in their schools' admissions decisions. "We've been wondering why the weather's been so cold: It's because Christmas was coming in June," said Larry S. Gibson, a professor and admissions committee member at the University of Maryland School of Law. "This is the first time the court has unambiguously said affirmative action is constitutional, that diversity is a compelling state interest, and that affirmative action can be used to achieve it."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- A newly formed group of foes of affirmative action began putting pressure yesterday on all 50 state attorneys general to wipe out "the vast majority" of race preferences in state and local government.Calling itself the "Project for All Deliberate Speed," borrowing the phrase the Supreme Court used to order prompt obedience to its school desegregation decision, the group said state officials must act deliberately now to carry out recent Supreme Court court rulings sharply limiting race-based affirmative action.
NEWS
By HOWARD ALTSTEIN | January 25, 2006
In 2002, the last year for which there are national statistics, 300,000 women between the ages of 18 to 44 were seeking to adopt a child and had taken specific measures to do so. It's not surprising that about half of the women preferred a single non-disabled child under the age of two. What is significant are the racial preferences of these black and white women toward the race of any future adopted child. Eighty-four percent of white women seeking to adopt would "prefer or accept" an African-American child as compared with 75 percent of African-American women who would "prefer or accept" a white child, a difference of only 9 percentage points.
TOPIC
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2003
Like many Americans, Kenyatta Rowel is not entirely comfortable with racial preferences in college admissions. The University of Maryland Eastern Shore sophomore from Annapolis says he'd prefer affirmative action in higher education to be based on socioeconomic disadvantage rather than race. "It should be promoted not just for minorities but for anyone who's caught the back hand of society," says Rowel, 22, an English major at the historically black college. With the U.S. Supreme Court weighing the legality of racial preferences at the University of Michigan - a case that could overhaul college admissions in Maryland and the rest of the country - majorities of Americans tell pollsters they'd like to see race-based affirmative action replaced with preferences designed for the poor of all colors.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2003
PRINCESS ANNE M-y Sitting on a bench on the bucolic campus of the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore, sophomore Jodi Ann Gordon didnM-Ft hesitate when asked why she had come to a historically black college. "I personally wouldn't go to a predominantly white college." said the African-American student from Hartford, Conn. "It's a comfort-level thing." That sentiment, a fairly common one at UMES, is now at is sue in the landmark affirmative action case before the U.S. Supreme Court. In an unlikely twist, opponents of racial preferences in college admissions have seized on historically black colleges to help make their argument against affirmative action.
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