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Racial Justice

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NEWS
June 24, 1994
House and Senate conferees are trying to reconcile differences between their two versions of the omnibus crime bill. One sticking point is the House amendment often called the Racial Justice Act. This legislation, no whisper of which is in the Senate crime bill, allows those condemned to death to offer statistics as evidence of racial discrimination in the sentencing jurisdiction. Some studies in the past have shown that capital punishment is more often resorted to in cases where the killer is black and the victim is white than in all other cases.
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NEWS
August 26, 2013
They came and they came and they came. Streaming down 17th Street toward the Lincoln Memorial, about 100,000 of us, black, brown and light-skinned, some speaking languages other than English, they came together to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s March on Washington. The young, holding onto the hands of the wise, were there in force, the future learning from the past ("Obama in gray area as he commemorates march," Aug. 26). Many of us were outraged and our signs witnessed those grievances - justice, merciful immigration laws, more jobs, better wages, fair development, peace in our cities, better schools for our kids, treatment and rehabilitation for prisoners.
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NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- If may be true that there are lies, damned lies and statistics, but never have statistics been more important than they are today.217-212.The Senate, with only one black member, not only left the RJA out of its crime bill, but voted 58-41 in a nonbinding resolution to oppose the RJA.(The politics of capital punishment were evident in how California's two Democratic senators split on the issue: Dianne Feinstein, up for re-election this year, voted against the RJA and Barbara Boxer, not facing re-election until 1998, voted for it.)
NEWS
June 18, 2013
In the 1960s, I was young, and it was an exciting time to be Catholic. We fought for freedom and justice. Parishes formed social justice committees, priests were arrested at civil rights demonstrations. The archbishop published a document on racial justice. Now I am old, and the eternal church seems to have aged with me. Instead of calling for change, we mobilize for the status quo. Aside from the usual fundraising letters, Archbishop William E. Lori has communicated about gay marriage and the storm water tax. Now we rally in support of an employer's right to offer limited medical insurance ("Religious freedom under threat at home," June 16)
NEWS
October 11, 2009
Seven women were honored this month for their contributions to racial justice, equal opportunity and community service during the 14th annual Fannie Lou Hamer Awards Reception at St. John's College. This year's honorees are U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski; Vanessa Bass, senior manager of recruitment and staffing for Anne Arundel public schools and vice president of the Anne Arundel County Alliance of Black Educators; Jan Chapman, founder, owner and CEO of an investment advisory firm; Victoria Bruce, an author and filmmaker with a background in science whose second book, "Hostage Nation," will be published next year; Karin Hayes, a writer, director and producer who co-wrote "Hostage Nation" with Bruce; Caldonia Johnson, a volunteer who works with the Anne Arundel County Red Cross, Lincoln Heights Community Association and Foster Grandparent program; and Alice Wright, a registered nurse who retired in 1997 after a 43-year career.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Death row murderers find few champions among those who get elected for a living.To a politician, sticking up for a killer is a no-win proposition.The Racial Justice Act, however, seemed to be an exception to this rule.The act, part of the House version of the Crime Bill now before Congress, would allow condemned killers to escape death if they could show through statistical analysis that their sentences were the result of racial bias.And many in the House, especially the Congressional Black Caucus, thought this was only just.
NEWS
By The New York Times | November 14, 1990
TO MILLIONS of admirers around the world, the disclosures about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his doctoral dissertation cast a shadow on his memory; a shadow should not, however, be confused with a cloud.Scholarship rests on truth and trust, which is why scholars are right to denounce plagiarism mercilessly; that's why it is so dismaying to learn that King's doctoral thesis contained an extraordinary amount of material borrowed or copied, unattributed, from the work of others.But however just it may be to denounce his scholarship, that should not be confused with his leadership.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1996
Citing the need for dedication to social and racial justice issues, the political action committee for Howard County's largest African-American network released its endorsements for candidates in the Nov. 5 election yesterday.The committee -- African Americans in Howard County -- is an outgrowth of the African-American Coalition, which represents more than 20 county groups, said Rev. Robert A. F. Turner, the president.In all but the nonpartisan judicial and school board races, the committee endorsed Democrats:For president and vice president, President Clinton and Al Gore.
NEWS
June 18, 2013
In the 1960s, I was young, and it was an exciting time to be Catholic. We fought for freedom and justice. Parishes formed social justice committees, priests were arrested at civil rights demonstrations. The archbishop published a document on racial justice. Now I am old, and the eternal church seems to have aged with me. Instead of calling for change, we mobilize for the status quo. Aside from the usual fundraising letters, Archbishop William E. Lori has communicated about gay marriage and the storm water tax. Now we rally in support of an employer's right to offer limited medical insurance ("Religious freedom under threat at home," June 16)
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 15, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton has abandoned efforts to get the Senate to accept safeguards against racially biased death sentences in the $30 billion crime bill, risking the ire of the Congressional Black Caucus rather than lose legislation that would be a precious political trophy.The president's decision, conveyed by an aide Wednesday night to the caucus chairman, Rep. Kweisi Mfume of Baltimore, presumably lifts the threat of a Senate filibuster against the sweeping measure. At least a dozen senators have threatened to filibuster the crime bill if it includes the so-called "racial justice" provision.
NEWS
By Joe Pettit | March 8, 2010
The recent firing of an adjunct art instructor by Towson University because the instructor used a "racial slur" raises many important issues related to race and the power of language, political correctness, and the over-reliance by state universities and state legislators on adjunct employees. Less obvious, but more important, are problems that this incident demonstrates in the discussion of race in our country. First, focusing on the use of a racial slur -- in this case, the notorious "N-word" -- reinforces the narrow practice of thinking about racial justice only in terms of the treatment of individuals rather than the inequalities in outcomes between racial groups.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa , sam.sessa@baltsun.com | December 3, 2009
In today's culture, rebels often get a bad rap. But not all of them deserve the negative connotations that come with the word. A number of people who were once labeled rebels are now considered heroes by mainstream America, according to Cherrie Woods, the director of marketing and public relations at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture. The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was once considered a rebel. So was Rosa Parks, she said. "In the '50s and '60s, any African-Americans who were not treated as equals and chose to challenge this system were viewed as rebels," Woods said.
NEWS
October 11, 2009
Seven women were honored this month for their contributions to racial justice, equal opportunity and community service during the 14th annual Fannie Lou Hamer Awards Reception at St. John's College. This year's honorees are U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski; Vanessa Bass, senior manager of recruitment and staffing for Anne Arundel public schools and vice president of the Anne Arundel County Alliance of Black Educators; Jan Chapman, founder, owner and CEO of an investment advisory firm; Victoria Bruce, an author and filmmaker with a background in science whose second book, "Hostage Nation," will be published next year; Karin Hayes, a writer, director and producer who co-wrote "Hostage Nation" with Bruce; Caldonia Johnson, a volunteer who works with the Anne Arundel County Red Cross, Lincoln Heights Community Association and Foster Grandparent program; and Alice Wright, a registered nurse who retired in 1997 after a 43-year career.
NEWS
By Dennis D. Parker and Susan Goering | December 26, 2008
Barack Obama's election to this country's highest office powerfully shattered a centuries-old racial glass ceiling. But we must not be tricked into thinking that this inspiring milestone means we have dismantled all structures of racial discrimination in America, or that we can take a breather from the tireless fight for racial justice. Fighting against individual acts of intentional discrimination is important, but the real cause of persistent segregation is institutional discrimination.
NEWS
By RON SMITH | December 3, 2008
On Thanksgiving morning, the top right-hand corner of this page quoted Mark Potok of the Southern Poverty Law Center on what he said was the reaction of hate groups to the dawning of the Age of Obama: "We've seen everything from cross-burnings on lawns of interracial couples to effigies of [President-elect Barack] Obama hanging from nooses to unpleasant exchanges in schoolyards. I think we're in a worrying situation right now." The Southern Poverty Law Center is a thriving business. The Alabama-based "nonprofit" firm has become a font of riches for founder Morris Dees and his associates.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun Reporter | July 10, 2007
Madeline Wheeler Murphy, a passionate community activist, civil rights champion and popular panelist on the WJZ-TV show Square Off, died of a heart attack Sunday at her Roland Park Place residence. She was 84. Mrs. Murphy was active in city politics and ran for City Council three times, twice in the 1960s and again in 1983, the same year that her son, William H. Murphy Jr., made an unsuccessful bid to unseat then-Mayor William Donald Schaefer in the Democratic primary. Mrs. Murphy often appeared as a guest on local television and radio shows, most notably Square Off, where she aired her progressive views and seemed to relish clashing with conservative panelists.
NEWS
By Carl Upchurch | August 12, 1994
JIM CROW lives again, thanks to the U.S. Congress.As the House and Senate negotiated the final version of the $30 billion crime bill, they abandoned the Racial Justice Act -- a section of the crime bill that would have allowed death-row convicts to cite racial bias in appealing sentences.That such bias exists is no longer in dispute. A wealth of data vTC clearly shows that this country executes its citizens based on the answers to three questions: What color are you? How much money do you have?
NEWS
May 2, 2004
David S. Sheridan, 95, who is credited with inventing the modern disposable catheter, died Thursday in Argyle, N.Y. Active in the catheter business until the age of 90, he was dubbed the "Catheter King" in 1988 by Forbes magazine. Until World War II, urethral catheters were usually made of braided cotton strings that looked like shoelaces. Mr. Sheridan built a machine that made disposable plastic catheter tubes. He later figured out a way to produce plastic catheters with wider ends and put a line of radioactive paint down a catheter that would show up on X-rays.
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