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Racial Harmony

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By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | July 5, 1992
Outside a West Baltimore Catholic church yesterday, priest and parishioner prayed for racial harmony and individual empowerment. They spoke of the right to vote and the need to exercise that right.But Myrtle Stanley perhaps best explained why any of it should matter."We all came on different ships, but we're in the same boat together now," said Mrs. Stanley.She was speaking at an event billed by the Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore as a renewal of commitment in promoting understanding between blacks and whites within the city -- and beyond its borders.
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NEWS
July 20, 2013
In The Sun's recent editorial regarding the acquittal of George Zimmerman ("No justice," July 16), deemed outrageous is the assertion by Mr. Zimmerman's defense team that he never would have been charged if he were black. Later in the editorial, however, The Sun asserts that had Trayvon Martin been a white teenager in khakis and a button-down, Mr. Zimmerman would almost certainly not have jumped to the conclusions he did regarding his suspicions of Mr. Martin. This obvious double standard undermines your premise that racial prejudice is responsible for what happened that night, for the Sun has fallen prey to the same prejudices and ignorant presumptions regarding Mr. Zimmerman that you assert caused him to act as he did. Furthermore, your subtle implication that this matter is a typical case of white racism applied to a black victim is absurd but follows the lead of President Barack Obama, the Rev. Al Sharpton, Attorney General Eric Holder and the big media in manufacturing an explosive racial incident when no evidence exists of any such thing.
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NEWS
November 7, 1996
ONCE AGAIN, Howard County's bench will become all-white. Voters Tuesday apparently rejected Gov. Parris Glendening's attempt to bring racial diversity to Howard's courts, ousting the first-ever African-American judge, Donna Hill Staton.Mr. Glendening's mistake a year ago may have been in misjudging Howard. The governor said he believed the county's growing diversity warranted greater balance in its judiciary. He, too, believed Howard had earned its reputation for racial harmony, a perception largely created by the late James W. Rouse, who sought tolerance as he built Columbia.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2011
Mary E. Bryson, a Carroll County civic activist and longtime trustee of what is now McDaniel College, died Thursday of heart failure at Father's Care, her Westminster farm. She was 96. The daughter of a Methodist minister and a homemaker, Mary Elizabeth Brown was born in Cumberland and raised there as well as in Washington, Baltimore and Snow Hill, where her father pastored churches. After graduating from Washington's Eastern High School in 1931, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1935 from what was then Western Maryland College.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1998
NAACP President Kweisi Mfume yesterday called on companies to become more ethnically diverse.Addressing a group of business people at the Center Club downtown, Mfume said that diversity will help a firm's bottom line, and that too few companies are actively hiring and promoting minorities. "Homogeneous work teams are generally less innovative than those representing diverse viewpoints and diverse backgrounds," he said.The former congressman decried what he called "a national scourge of insensitivity and intolerance," and said that business and economic topics are central to the quest for greater racial harmony and equality.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | June 14, 1992
The white-supremacist newspapers that were scattered on Columbia lawns and doorsteps this winter seemed to have breached one of the city's most fundamental tenets: People of all races, ethnic backgrounds and nationalities could exist here in harmony.The idealism that founded Columbia -- which celebrates its 25th birthday this week -- still exists, but it has been tempered with realism. While Columbia founder James W. Rouse envisioned a utopian city, some say he got a better city than most.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | September 13, 2007
Norman John Bowmaker, a retired Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. executive who promoted racial harmony in 1960s West Baltimore, died of heart disease Friday at Atrium Village in Owings Mills. The former Ten Hills resident was 82. Mr. Bowmaker, a division vice president at the utility, retired in 1987 after a 37-year career during which he served as an electrical engineer, human relations manager, and in electrical operations and general administration. Born in Hartwick, N.Y., he served from 1943 to 1946 in the Army in Belgium and Germany and in the Mariana Islands in the Pacific.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2011
Mary E. Bryson, a Carroll County civic activist and longtime trustee of what is now McDaniel College, died Thursday of heart failure at Father's Care, her Westminster farm. She was 96. The daughter of a Methodist minister and a homemaker, Mary Elizabeth Brown was born in Cumberland and raised there as well as in Washington, Baltimore and Snow Hill, where her father pastored churches. After graduating from Washington's Eastern High School in 1931, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1935 from what was then Western Maryland College.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2000
The Columbia Democratic Club was at work last night to spur local interest in Maryland's March 7 presidential primary election. With a membership of 80, the club has sponsored several well-attended meetings lately, said Vice President Neil Quinter, who presided at last night's event at Jeffers Hill Neighborhood Center in Columbia. After spirited speeches from members and others, Vice President Al Gore won the club's endorsement for the party presidential nomination over former New Jersey Sen. Bill Bradley, 28-13.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1996
Howard County police charged a 14-year-old Mount Airy boy yesterday with spraying a racial slur on the entrance sign at River Hill High School in August -- a crime deplored by students, who said they thought race relations at the school were fine.The juvenile was charged with one count of destruction of property and violation of the racial and religious sections of state law, said Sgt. Steven Keller, a police spokesman.The school system reported 452 vandalism and 86 graffiti incidents during the 1994-95 school year, costing $61,641 to repair and clean up.The racial slur was spray-painted on the school's 6-foot-tall blue and yellow sign Aug. 31.During the same weekend, a swastika was smeared in chocolate on a home in Columbia's Kings Contrivance village.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 28, 2009
Norvice G. Penny, an educator who later was director of human relations for Baltimore County Public Schools and who worked tirelessly to improve race and community relations as well as the quality of education for all students, died of congestive heart failure Sept. 18 at Northwest Hospital Center. The longtime Lochearn resident was 76. "I would give Norvice the credit for ushering Baltimore County schools into diversity and minority recognition and providing full equality to all students and the broader community.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | September 13, 2007
Norman John Bowmaker, a retired Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. executive who promoted racial harmony in 1960s West Baltimore, died of heart disease Friday at Atrium Village in Owings Mills. The former Ten Hills resident was 82. Mr. Bowmaker, a division vice president at the utility, retired in 1987 after a 37-year career during which he served as an electrical engineer, human relations manager, and in electrical operations and general administration. Born in Hartwick, N.Y., he served from 1943 to 1946 in the Army in Belgium and Germany and in the Mariana Islands in the Pacific.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,[Sun Reporter] | October 22, 2006
For two days, they gathered in a corner of the library, in classrooms and lecture halls and tried to identify and solve what they saw as their school's major issues. Black. White. Asian. Hispanic. Biracial. The Westminster High School students ran the gamut and were selected to put issues of race and ethnicity on the table without mincing words. "Who knows more about what goes on in this school?" a representative from the federal Department of Justice asked the 25 or so students sitting in wooden chairs in the media center.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 20, 2002
It was a good hair day for Hairspray in Seattle on Monday when the reviews came out for the new musical adapted from John Waters' 1988 movie. The show, which is playing an exclusive pre-Broadway engagement at Seattle's 5th Avenue Theatre, received positive reviews from the city's two major newspapers and Daily Variety. Here are excerpts: Misha Berson wrote in The Seattle Times: "A Bye Bye Birdie for the Age of Irony, this is a retro-pop romp with wit, heart, a social conscience and, rarity of rarities, a new score by composer Marc Shaiman and his co-lyricist Scott Wittman that really makes you want to go dance in the streets.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | July 12, 2000
GEORGE W. BUSH, the Texas governor and Republican presidential candidate, came to town Monday and spoke to the NAACP of, in "Dubya's" words, "racial harmony and economic advancement." The crowd was polite. Some even gave Bush a standing ovation when he rose to speak. The governor said some good things, but you had to get the feeling he was telling folks pretty much what they wanted to hear, as opposed to what they needed to hear. America doesn't need racial harmony as much as it needs racial candor.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2000
The Rev. George Freeman Bragg Jr., the rector of Baltimore's St. James' First African Protestant Episcopal Church from 1891 until his death in 1940, was described by a parishioner as being a "short, thin man, with a very soft voice." Bragg may have been diminutive in stature, but he proved throughout his life to be a powerful voice and advocate for black equality and harmonious relations between the races. Born in Warrenton, N.C., in 1863, he attended St. Stephen's Normal School and Bishop Payne Divinity School.
NEWS
July 20, 2013
In The Sun's recent editorial regarding the acquittal of George Zimmerman ("No justice," July 16), deemed outrageous is the assertion by Mr. Zimmerman's defense team that he never would have been charged if he were black. Later in the editorial, however, The Sun asserts that had Trayvon Martin been a white teenager in khakis and a button-down, Mr. Zimmerman would almost certainly not have jumped to the conclusions he did regarding his suspicions of Mr. Martin. This obvious double standard undermines your premise that racial prejudice is responsible for what happened that night, for the Sun has fallen prey to the same prejudices and ignorant presumptions regarding Mr. Zimmerman that you assert caused him to act as he did. Furthermore, your subtle implication that this matter is a typical case of white racism applied to a black victim is absurd but follows the lead of President Barack Obama, the Rev. Al Sharpton, Attorney General Eric Holder and the big media in manufacturing an explosive racial incident when no evidence exists of any such thing.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2000
The Columbia Democratic Club was at work last night to spur local interest in Maryland's March 7 presidential primary election. With a membership of 80, the club has sponsored several well-attended meetings lately, said Vice President Neil Quinter, who presided at last night's event at Jeffers Hill Neighborhood Center in Columbia. After spirited speeches from members and others, Vice President Al Gore won the club's endorsement for the party presidential nomination over former New Jersey Sen. Bill Bradley, 28-13.
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