Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRacial Equality
IN THE NEWS

Racial Equality

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Farai Chideya | July 11, 1999
A 21-YEAR-old white supremacist chose Independence Day weekend to wage a one-man race war. Benjamin Nathaniel Smith went on a three-day killing spree through Illinois and Indiana that targeted blacks, Jews and Asians. He killed two people and left nine others injured before turning the gun on himself.The victims' deaths are not the only tragedies. Even more troubling is the fact that, to some Americans, Smith is a hero.To white supremacists, Smith is a martyred race warrior. The numbers of such warriors have, paradoxically, risen in the past few years as the country experienced phenomenal economic growth.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 4, 2013
As we celebrate the 50 t h anniversary of Martin Luther King's "I have a dream" speech, it becomes ever more obvious that years of big government attempts to mandate racial equality have failed ( "Anniversary March on Washington shows Dr. King's 'dream' remains unfulfilled," Aug. 28). In his speech, King was driven by his morality and his service to a divine cause. He dreamed of a future in which all God's children were equal, and of a time where white, black, yellow, brown and red would have a dignity not based upon the color of their skin, but upon the goodness and purity of their divinely formed character.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | April 22, 2007
Color-Blind Justice Albion Tourgee and the Quest for Racial Equality By Mark Elliott Oxford University Press / 388 pages / $30 For most of his life, Albion Tourgee persevered on "a fool's errand." An advocate of the abolition of slavery, he enlisted in the Army soon after the Confederates fired on Fort Sumter. Severely wounded, captured and released, Tourgee returned to duty as a lieutenant with the 105th Ohio Infantry. He would settle for nothing less than a "complete revolution and renovation" establishing a color-blind society, he wrote in 1863: "For this I am willing to die - for this I expect to die."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | March 6, 2010
Charles R. Thomas Sr., a retired Baltimore City firefighter who was a voice for civil rights and racial harmony within his department, died of heart disease Feb. 23 at his Govans home. He was 86. Fire officials held him in such high regard they named the West Baltimore firehouse where he served for nearly 23 years in his honor. Born in Baltimore and raised on Mount Street, he was a graduate of the old J.C. Briscoe General Vocational School. In an interview, he said that as a child, he dreamed of riding a fire engine and using what he called "cool equipment."
NEWS
August 31, 1999
LEGACIES of Theodore Roosevelt McKeldin, Maryland's pre-eminent political leader after World War II, are all around us: In his two terms as governor and two terms as Baltimore mayor, he built what today is the Baltimore-Washington International Airport, started the Inner Harbor rebirth and oversaw a massive highway program that included the Baltimore and Washington beltways and the first car tunnel under the Patapsco River.Equally important was the civility and moderate tone this Republi-can set for the overwhelmingly Democratic state.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1995
With music and drama in the mix, tomorrow's program on racial equality at St. Paul's United Church of Christ in Westminster promises to be lively.But a good time isn't all organizers have planned. They hope the program, called "Strengthen Community through Racial Equality," will inspire discussion about how Carroll County residents can improve relations among different races."It's an opportunity to have some fun and meet new people that might be across racial boundaries," said Gary Honeman of Westminster, one of three coordinators of Carroll Citizens for Racial Equality, the group sponsoring the event.
NEWS
March 20, 2002
Recent rainfall leads Health Department to lift open-burning ban Carroll County Health Department, in consultation with the Carroll County Fire Chiefs Association, has determined that recent rainfall has reduced hazardous conditions that had existed in the county. Effective immediately, the Health Department is lifting the open-burning ban that was imposed recently. However, drought conditions remain and the burn ban might have to be reimposed. Information: 410-857-5009. Middle school conference to address race relations The Middle School Multicultural Leadership Conference will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. today at Western Maryland College.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1995
Plaid stands for something this week in Carroll County.The brightly colored ribbons people have pinned to their lapels and shirt collars are designed to let others know they believe that harmony and understanding among races and cultures are important.The ribbons are being distributed as part of Human Relations Week, which started yesterday and is sponsored by the Carroll County Human Relations Commission. The commission chooses one week a year to highlight efforts in Carroll to improve community relations, said Virginia Harrison of Sykesville, who chairs the seven-member commission.
NEWS
April 24, 1995
Environmental groups to hold weekend suppersSt. Mary's United Church of Christ, 1441 E. Mayberry Road, Silver Run, will be the site of a covered dish supper Friday and Saturday.The Keystone Landfill Task Force, C.U.R.E. (Citizens Urge Rescue of the Environment) and P.A.C.E. (People Against Contamination of the Environment) will sponsor the dinner. A social hour begins at 5 p.m., dinner at 6 p.m. and an informal discussion at 7 p.m.Topics include landfill concerns and the effects the Superfund has had on families' lives and the environment.
NEWS
April 9, 1993
Carroll Citizens for Racial Equality will have a public conference on racism and equality from 9 a.m. to noon, April 17 at St. Paul's United Church of Christ, Bond and Green streets, Westminster."
NEWS
By Michael Higginbotham | April 4, 2008
Forty years ago today, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was murdered. The night before he died, the Nobel Peace Prize winner delivered a speech predicting the nation's future and his own demise. Dr. King prophesied that, while he likely would not live to see the day, he had no doubts that all Americans, including blacks, would some day "get to the promised land" of racial equality. Four decades after Dr. King's death, Barack Obama, the U.S. Senate's only black member, may become America's first black president.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | December 31, 2007
Francis Nash "Ike" Iglehart Jr., an Army veteran and attorney who dedicated much of his life to racial equality and environmental preservation, died Friday at his home in Monkton of complications from Parkinson's disease. He was 82. Mr. Iglehart graduated from St. Paul's School in New Hampshire in 1943. At age 18, he was drafted into the Army and was assigned to the now-defunct Army Specialized Training Program. In 1946, he was discharged from the military after being wounded in the Battle of the Bulge.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | April 22, 2007
Color-Blind Justice Albion Tourgee and the Quest for Racial Equality By Mark Elliott Oxford University Press / 388 pages / $30 For most of his life, Albion Tourgee persevered on "a fool's errand." An advocate of the abolition of slavery, he enlisted in the Army soon after the Confederates fired on Fort Sumter. Severely wounded, captured and released, Tourgee returned to duty as a lieutenant with the 105th Ohio Infantry. He would settle for nothing less than a "complete revolution and renovation" establishing a color-blind society, he wrote in 1863: "For this I am willing to die - for this I expect to die."
NEWS
By Dirk Haire | January 15, 2004
I AM THE recipient of the 2004 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Dream Keepers Award, which previously has been given to significant civil rights figures, including NAACP Chairman Julian Bond, former U.S. Rep. Parren J. Mitchell and former Maryland Attorney General Stephen H. Sachs. The award is in recognition of my volunteer efforts in the African-American community. I am also the white general counsel of the Maryland Republican Party. How can this be? I was raised in one of the few racially integrated communities in southern Indiana.
NEWS
March 23, 2003
Traffic roundabout being constructed at Routes 88, 833 The State Highway Administration will begin work tomorrow to reconstruct an intersection at Lower Beckleysville Road (Route 88) and Black Rock Road (Route 833) in Hampstead. The project calls for a roundabout to be constructed to provide full access to both roads and improve traffic flow and safety. The $680,000 project was awarded to Concrete General Inc. of Gaithersburg. The project will affect roads along Routes 88 and 833. During the work, one lane will remain open to traffic in each direction.
NEWS
By Thomas Hylton | January 15, 2003
IN THE FOUR decades since the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech, America has made extraordinary strides toward racial equality - integration in the workplace, an expanding black middle class, the election of blacks to high political office. In fact, judging from the cries of outrage over Sen. Trent Lott's favorable reference to segregation, one might conclude America now wholeheartedly embraces racial diversity. Unfortunately, when it comes to where we live and send our children to school, our nation is as segregated as ever.
NEWS
By Dirk Haire | January 15, 2004
I AM THE recipient of the 2004 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Dream Keepers Award, which previously has been given to significant civil rights figures, including NAACP Chairman Julian Bond, former U.S. Rep. Parren J. Mitchell and former Maryland Attorney General Stephen H. Sachs. The award is in recognition of my volunteer efforts in the African-American community. I am also the white general counsel of the Maryland Republican Party. How can this be? I was raised in one of the few racially integrated communities in southern Indiana.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | March 3, 1993
Virginia Harrison says she felt the first stings of racism on a childhood visit to an amusement park in Maryland. After waiting eagerly with a ticket in hand for her turn on a ride, she wasn't allowed to board.She asked why."Because you are black," she was told.The rest of the day, the little girl watched white children enjoy the rides and thought: "I am going to fix these people." But the little girl became a tolerant woman."I decided to rise above racism and not let it bring me down," said Ms. Harrison, director of the county Community Relations Commission.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2002
There once was an enchanted forest along the Magothy River, where children rode a Ferris wheel and played arcade games, families picnicked by the water, the faithful were baptized in the river and James Brown performed for Saturday night revelers in the dance pavilion. Beechwood Park was a short-lived summer sanctuary in Pasadena that catered to black residents in the Baltimore area and beyond who wanted to spend a day by the water - a simple pleasure often denied them in a segregated society in which many local beaches served whites only.
NEWS
March 20, 2002
Recent rainfall leads Health Department to lift open-burning ban Carroll County Health Department, in consultation with the Carroll County Fire Chiefs Association, has determined that recent rainfall has reduced hazardous conditions that had existed in the county. Effective immediately, the Health Department is lifting the open-burning ban that was imposed recently. However, drought conditions remain and the burn ban might have to be reimposed. Information: 410-857-5009. Middle school conference to address race relations The Middle School Multicultural Leadership Conference will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. today at Western Maryland College.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.