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Rachel Weisz

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By Mark Caro and Mark Caro,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 5, 2005
You've probably seen Rachel Weisz in several movies, yet the next time you catch her -- most likely in the new film The Constant Gardener -- you still won't know what to expect. That's because Weisz isn't one of those actresses who arrives on screen accompanied by a carefully crafted persona or well-publicized dating history. Actresses such as Julia Roberts, Jennifer Aniston and Sandra Bullock have branded themselves, their names selling tickets because viewers feel like they know these performers on screen and off. Weisz, a 34-year-old British actress who does American accents often and well, has the kind of beauty and talent that could make her a natural fixture of our tabloid culture, but she hasn't gone that route.
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April 14, 2013
now playing "42" (PG-13). Story depicting how Jackie Robinson and Brooklyn Dodgers General Manager Branch Rickey changed the game of baseball by breaking the color barrier. With Chadwick Boseman, Harrison Ford and Nicole Beharie. TownMall Cinemas (1:00, 4:00, 7:00 p.m.) "The Croods" (PG). A prehistoric family embarks on a journey into the world when their cave is destroyed. With Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone and Ryan Reynolds. TownMall Cinemas (1:10*, 4:30, 6:50* p.m.)
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 10, 1998
"The Land Girls" is a noble, if inert, attempt to pay homage to an extraordinary chapter in Britain's life during World War II. Although it depicts that time and its changing social mores with atmospheric intensity and detail, "The Land Girls" remains an oddly lifeless, albeit earnest, piece of history.Stella (Catherine McCormack), Ag (Rachel Weisz) and Prue (Anna Friel) have all signed on to work in the Women's Land Army, a group formed during World War I when the young men who usually worked the farms and fields went off to war. The WLA -- or "land girls," as they were called -- showed up in rural towns and farms throughout the country to keep the farms running.
FEATURES
March 7, 2008
Capsules by Michael Sragow or Chris Kaltenbach, unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. Be Kind Rewind -- In this combination of Dada farce and daddy comedy, Jack Black and Mos Def carve out a cult of no-budget, handmade short films to save the small business - and ultimately the neighborhood - of their father figure (Danny Glover), the owner of the Be Kind Rewind video store. This movie doesn't have a mean bone in its body; the problem is, it doesn't have any bone in its body.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 25, 2003
James Foley does a skillful job directing Confidence, but mostly he succeeds in turning a sow's ear into a pigskin wallet. This con-man extravaganza features a clean-cut grifter (Edward Burns) and his "too old to run, too young for San Quentin" gang (Paul Giamatti, Brian Van Holt) pulling a scam on a corrupt banker (Robert Forster) in order to pay off an L.A. kingpin they inadvertently swindled (Dustin Hoffman). Along the way, Burns enlists the services of a fleet-fingered party girl (Rachel Weisz)
EXPLORE
April 14, 2013
now playing "42" (PG-13). Story depicting how Jackie Robinson and Brooklyn Dodgers General Manager Branch Rickey changed the game of baseball by breaking the color barrier. With Chadwick Boseman, Harrison Ford and Nicole Beharie. TownMall Cinemas (1:00, 4:00, 7:00 p.m.) "The Croods" (PG). A prehistoric family embarks on a journey into the world when their cave is destroyed. With Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone and Ryan Reynolds. TownMall Cinemas (1:10*, 4:30, 6:50* p.m.)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 25, 2004
Two Brothers resembles Disney cartoons and nature shorts of yore, but with bared and sharpened claws. The brothers of the title are a feisty tiger cub who loses his spunk to a sadistic tamer, and the docile twin who grows fearsome when caged with other wild animals in a private menagerie. The storytelling is so hectic and staccato that the difference in their temperaments as twins - when young, then older big cats - hardly registers. Too much significance rests on the sight, early in the film, of brother No. 1, Kumal, confronting an aggressive civet cat (it looks like an exotic skunk)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 28, 2005
The Brazilian filmmaker Fernando Meirelles immediately won the reputation of being a director's director when his dynamo of a mosaic about the Rio de Janeiro underclass, City of God, opened two years ago. It had an astonishing impact for a movie done in Meirelles' native language, Portuguese. Its virtuosity dazzled but also distanced some critics, including me. It was Hollywood filmmakers who gave Meirelles his creative supernova status when they handed his film four Academy Award nominations, including one for best director.
FEATURES
March 7, 2008
Capsules by Michael Sragow or Chris Kaltenbach, unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. Be Kind Rewind -- In this combination of Dada farce and daddy comedy, Jack Black and Mos Def carve out a cult of no-budget, handmade short films to save the small business - and ultimately the neighborhood - of their father figure (Danny Glover), the owner of the Be Kind Rewind video store. This movie doesn't have a mean bone in its body; the problem is, it doesn't have any bone in its body.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 8, 2006
It's the Attack of the A-List Directors. And it's going to last for weeks - and months - in theaters this fall. After scaling visual peaks with his Howard Hughes biopic The Aviator (2004), Martin Scorsese digs into the asphalt jungles of the East Coast with The Departed, an undercover-cop suspense film set in Boston, with the powerhouse trio of Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon and Jack Nicholson. Brian De Palma has been riding a new wave of renown ever since hip-hop stars began modeling themselves on his 1983 gangster movie Scarface.
FEATURES
By Mark Caro and Mark Caro,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 5, 2005
You've probably seen Rachel Weisz in several movies, yet the next time you catch her -- most likely in the new film The Constant Gardener -- you still won't know what to expect. That's because Weisz isn't one of those actresses who arrives on screen accompanied by a carefully crafted persona or well-publicized dating history. Actresses such as Julia Roberts, Jennifer Aniston and Sandra Bullock have branded themselves, their names selling tickets because viewers feel like they know these performers on screen and off. Weisz, a 34-year-old British actress who does American accents often and well, has the kind of beauty and talent that could make her a natural fixture of our tabloid culture, but she hasn't gone that route.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 28, 2005
The Brazilian filmmaker Fernando Meirelles immediately won the reputation of being a director's director when his dynamo of a mosaic about the Rio de Janeiro underclass, City of God, opened two years ago. It had an astonishing impact for a movie done in Meirelles' native language, Portuguese. Its virtuosity dazzled but also distanced some critics, including me. It was Hollywood filmmakers who gave Meirelles his creative supernova status when they handed his film four Academy Award nominations, including one for best director.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 25, 2004
Two Brothers resembles Disney cartoons and nature shorts of yore, but with bared and sharpened claws. The brothers of the title are a feisty tiger cub who loses his spunk to a sadistic tamer, and the docile twin who grows fearsome when caged with other wild animals in a private menagerie. The storytelling is so hectic and staccato that the difference in their temperaments as twins - when young, then older big cats - hardly registers. Too much significance rests on the sight, early in the film, of brother No. 1, Kumal, confronting an aggressive civet cat (it looks like an exotic skunk)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 25, 2003
James Foley does a skillful job directing Confidence, but mostly he succeeds in turning a sow's ear into a pigskin wallet. This con-man extravaganza features a clean-cut grifter (Edward Burns) and his "too old to run, too young for San Quentin" gang (Paul Giamatti, Brian Van Holt) pulling a scam on a corrupt banker (Robert Forster) in order to pay off an L.A. kingpin they inadvertently swindled (Dustin Hoffman). Along the way, Burns enlists the services of a fleet-fingered party girl (Rachel Weisz)
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