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By Rachel Marsden | March 8, 2012
So Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putinhas just been re-presidented for at least another six years, during which we can all watch his newly tucked eyes migrate back to where they used to be. And as surely as a pound dog comes with fleas, this election came with "irregularities" -- cloaked in "democracy," as Russian powers like to do it. For instance, there were 200,000 webcams to monitor the polling stations, but all fed directly into the Kremlin....
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NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | December 26, 2013
A new report commissioned by the French Socialist government to make recommendations on how France can better integrate its residents of foreign origin has been described by former French Defense Minister Gerard Longuet as "organizing apartheid by inciting each community to affirm its difference," according to the French newspaper Le Figaro. I figured that had to be gross exaggeration -- until I read through the hundreds of pages myself. As a native Canadian, I couldn't help but notice that the French experts who compiled the report referred to the separatism-plagued French-Canadian province of Quebec as a "country" unto itself -- as in, "other countries, like Quebec.
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NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | September 13, 2012
It would seem that we're now at the stage of global economic lunacy where the worldwide socialist slide is so far gone that the president of Russia is lecturing the world, and particularly Europe, about the risks of socialism. Speaking at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation conference in Vladivostok, Russia, Vladimir Putin promoted the merits of free-market economics. He said that by pulling the former Soviet satellite states into its sphere after the fall of the Iron Curtain, Europe chose to take responsibility for subsidizing their economic well-being.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | September 13, 2012
It would seem that we're now at the stage of global economic lunacy where the worldwide socialist slide is so far gone that the president of Russia is lecturing the world, and particularly Europe, about the risks of socialism. Speaking at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation conference in Vladivostok, Russia, Vladimir Putin promoted the merits of free-market economics. He said that by pulling the former Soviet satellite states into its sphere after the fall of the Iron Curtain, Europe chose to take responsibility for subsidizing their economic well-being.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | May 17, 2012
While your co-workers hover around the water cooler debating whether it matters if Mitt Romney bullied some kid in his youth, a formerly First World nation called Greece is teetering on the brink of bankruptcy. Why, you might ask, should Middle America pry its overworked eyes away from Jennifer Lopez gyrating around in a bodysuit on "American Idol" long enough to bother caring? Now replace "Greece" with "your bank. " It suddenly matters a little more, doesn't it? What if your bank couldn't loan you money, give you a mortgage or allow you to ring up credit-card debt, all because the bank abruptly had much less with which to leverage your lifestyle since Greece decided to finally pull itself off fiscal life support?
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | May 10, 2012
Francehas elected only the second Socialist president in its history -- the first being Francois Mitterrand, who spent 14 years in the driver's seat back when French presidential terms lasted seven years rather than five, and who made a hard-right turn away from economic socialism and toward spending cuts after his first two years in office. The best France can hope for now is that the newly elected Francois Hollande takes a similar plunge into a pothole of pragmatism and douses any budding socialist ideas.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | May 24, 2012
Did you hear about the new bill that would allow the U.S. government's official overseas information agency to rebroadcast its content onto American TV and radio? The bipartisan Smith-Mundt Modernization Act of 2012 was introduced in Congress last week by Reps. Mac Thornberry, a Texas Republican, and Adam Smith, a Washington Democrat, both of whom are presumably dissatisfied with their satellite TV package and think more government-produced content would go down better with an after-work beer.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | June 28, 2012
As European leaders meet this week in an attempt to once again shoo reality away from the continent's respirator, countries outside the European Union are making it increasingly clear that they'll have no role in prolonging the charade. Cyprus has just asked for a bailout from the EU's ATM, joining Greece, Ireland, Portugal and, most recently, Spain. So what's the excuse this time? Apparently Cyprus' intimate exposure to the Greek economy was more than enough economic Ebola. So another beggar's cup starts rattling just in time for yet another summit of European leaders.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | August 22, 2012
If Justin Bieber or the Rolling Stones suddenly decided to stage an impromptu concert in a public place somewhere in America without a permit, would the authorities ignore it and shrug it off? Doubtful. Even buskers performing in the New York Citysubway system can't play without formal authorization from the city. What about taking such a musical performance into a church? If Jennifer Lopez or Madonna just showed up in a place of worship, stripped down to their skivvies and started dancing around the altar, would that fly in any Western democracy?
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | July 12, 2012
Testifying before a Senate committee a few months ago, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton lamented that America was "in an information war, and we are losing that war. " This week, she blew a fuse at the "Friends of Syria" meeting in Paris, saying that Russia and Chinashould "pay a price" for not supporting regime change in Syria. Here's a thought: How about using the power of truth to get things done rather than cover and manipulation? Russia and China aren't following America's script for one reason: They have major economic interests in Syria and rightfully see any attempt at regime change as America trying to steal their lunch.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | August 22, 2012
If Justin Bieber or the Rolling Stones suddenly decided to stage an impromptu concert in a public place somewhere in America without a permit, would the authorities ignore it and shrug it off? Doubtful. Even buskers performing in the New York Citysubway system can't play without formal authorization from the city. What about taking such a musical performance into a church? If Jennifer Lopez or Madonna just showed up in a place of worship, stripped down to their skivvies and started dancing around the altar, would that fly in any Western democracy?
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | July 12, 2012
Testifying before a Senate committee a few months ago, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton lamented that America was "in an information war, and we are losing that war. " This week, she blew a fuse at the "Friends of Syria" meeting in Paris, saying that Russia and Chinashould "pay a price" for not supporting regime change in Syria. Here's a thought: How about using the power of truth to get things done rather than cover and manipulation? Russia and China aren't following America's script for one reason: They have major economic interests in Syria and rightfully see any attempt at regime change as America trying to steal their lunch.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | July 5, 2012
Improved technology is changing the spy game, merging once-disparate roles in the intelligence field and favoring an increased download of traditional spy roles to the private sector. This week, Canada's Postmedia News cited a speech by Richard Fadden, the head of Canada's spy agency, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, in which he acknowledged this new reality. "In today's information universe of WikiLeaks, the Internet and social media, there are fewer and fewer meaningful secrets for the James Bonds of the world to steal," Mr. Fadden said.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | June 28, 2012
As European leaders meet this week in an attempt to once again shoo reality away from the continent's respirator, countries outside the European Union are making it increasingly clear that they'll have no role in prolonging the charade. Cyprus has just asked for a bailout from the EU's ATM, joining Greece, Ireland, Portugal and, most recently, Spain. So what's the excuse this time? Apparently Cyprus' intimate exposure to the Greek economy was more than enough economic Ebola. So another beggar's cup starts rattling just in time for yet another summit of European leaders.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | May 24, 2012
Did you hear about the new bill that would allow the U.S. government's official overseas information agency to rebroadcast its content onto American TV and radio? The bipartisan Smith-Mundt Modernization Act of 2012 was introduced in Congress last week by Reps. Mac Thornberry, a Texas Republican, and Adam Smith, a Washington Democrat, both of whom are presumably dissatisfied with their satellite TV package and think more government-produced content would go down better with an after-work beer.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | May 17, 2012
While your co-workers hover around the water cooler debating whether it matters if Mitt Romney bullied some kid in his youth, a formerly First World nation called Greece is teetering on the brink of bankruptcy. Why, you might ask, should Middle America pry its overworked eyes away from Jennifer Lopez gyrating around in a bodysuit on "American Idol" long enough to bother caring? Now replace "Greece" with "your bank. " It suddenly matters a little more, doesn't it? What if your bank couldn't loan you money, give you a mortgage or allow you to ring up credit-card debt, all because the bank abruptly had much less with which to leverage your lifestyle since Greece decided to finally pull itself off fiscal life support?
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | July 5, 2012
Improved technology is changing the spy game, merging once-disparate roles in the intelligence field and favoring an increased download of traditional spy roles to the private sector. This week, Canada's Postmedia News cited a speech by Richard Fadden, the head of Canada's spy agency, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, in which he acknowledged this new reality. "In today's information universe of WikiLeaks, the Internet and social media, there are fewer and fewer meaningful secrets for the James Bonds of the world to steal," Mr. Fadden said.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | May 3, 2012
A Russian source recently brought an obscure but disturbing article to my attention. Published last month by a little-known online journal called the Oriental Review, the piece, "Active Endeavour And Drug Trafficking," proposed that not a single gram of heroin has been confiscated on the Mediterranean Sea since the inception of NATO's Operation Active Endeavour, a maritime operation launched a month after the Sept. 11 attacks with the mission of "monitoring shipping to help detect, deter and protect against terrorist activity.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | May 10, 2012
Francehas elected only the second Socialist president in its history -- the first being Francois Mitterrand, who spent 14 years in the driver's seat back when French presidential terms lasted seven years rather than five, and who made a hard-right turn away from economic socialism and toward spending cuts after his first two years in office. The best France can hope for now is that the newly elected Francois Hollande takes a similar plunge into a pothole of pragmatism and douses any budding socialist ideas.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | May 3, 2012
A Russian source recently brought an obscure but disturbing article to my attention. Published last month by a little-known online journal called the Oriental Review, the piece, "Active Endeavour And Drug Trafficking," proposed that not a single gram of heroin has been confiscated on the Mediterranean Sea since the inception of NATO's Operation Active Endeavour, a maritime operation launched a month after the Sept. 11 attacks with the mission of "monitoring shipping to help detect, deter and protect against terrorist activity.
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