Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRachel Carson
IN THE NEWS

Rachel Carson

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jeremy Lott and Erin Wildermuth | May 27, 2007
Today is the centenary of Rachel Carson's birth, which has been noted by many environmentalists who cherish her legacy. However, what has been little noted amid the celebrations and commemorations is the dark aspect of that legacy: that Ms. Carson's views led to the banning of pesticides at a cost of many thousands of lives worldwide. In 1948, Swiss chemist Paul Hermann Muller was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine. He was the first non-physician to win in that category - a surprise given the nature of the celebrated discovery.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Nancy C. Unger | September 16, 2012
Mitt Romney wants to open up more federal lands and waters to drilling for oil and natural gas. His party is pushing, in the name of freedom and economic opportunity, to roll back a variety of environmental protections. Republicans, including U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts of Kansas, are seeking to ease pesticide regulations; some are even questioning the Environmental Protection Agency's ban on DDT, reopening a controversy that stretches back half a century. Fifty years ago this month, Rachel Carson published "Silent Spring.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 13, 2007
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Patuxent Research Refuge will hold a centennial celebration of the birth of environmental pioneer and author Rachel Carson. The celebration is sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Rachel Carson Council. The celebration will begin with a ceremony at 10 a.m. Saturday at the refuge's National Wildlife Visitor Center, near Laurel. After the ceremony, programs will include live animals, hands-on activities, nature hikes and habitat tram tours.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
ABOARD THE R/V RACHEL CARSON - There may be a swifter, quieter, smoother ride on the Chesapeake Bay, but you'd have to know a dolphin to snag one. With a cold front bearing down and sheets of rain showing up in yellow and green waves on the radar, the state's new 81-foot research vessel, cruised lickety-split from Solomons to Annapolis for yesterday's christening. Two hours and change (like two pennies and a nickel) - 45 nautical miles - from dock to dock. Capt. Mike Reusing, the maestro at the controls of the $4.3 million floating laboratory, maintained a steady 21-knot pace, powered by twin jet-propulsion engines.
NEWS
By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | March 4, 2007
Hardy Californians: A Woman's Life With Native Plants Lester Rowntree University of California Press / 310 pages / $19.95 paper Who is the next Rachel Carson? It's a question you hear a lot in environmental circles. Where is the writer who can bridge the gap between poetry and science? Where is the book whose message is so accessible, so imperative, that it inspires not only activism but legislation? In his introduction to the 1994 edition of Silent Spring, Al Gore wrote that it and Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin "rank among the rare books that have transformed our society."
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | February 6, 2007
It's tempting to imagine Peter Rabbit peering out from beneath a hedge in Linda Lear's bewitching English-style garden. Lear recently published a biography of Beatrix Potter, the British author who created such beloved characters as Peter Rabbit, Benjamin Bunny, Jemima Puddleduck and Squirrel Nutkin in her illustrated children's books. It's true that a river glimpsed from Lear's home in Bethesda is the Potomac, and not a tributary meandering through the Scottish border country, which provided inspiration for many of Potter's classic stories.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2002
As West Nile virus spreads across the United States, people debating whether to spray disease-carrying mosquitoes find themselves referring to a book published 40 years ago - either to blame its long-dead author for the virus' victims or to repeat her warning that widespread use of pesticides is poisoning the planet, and us as well. The controversy would be all too familiar to Rachel Carson, the biologist-turned-writer whose seminal work, Silent Spring, hit the bookstands Sept. 27, 1962.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff | March 4, 2007
In 1962, the idea of progress, of modern man striding step by inevitable step up the staircase of history, was virtually unchallenged in the United States. One slim volume changed all that. It was written in Maryland by a woman born 100 years ago this year. Rachel Carson would live for only 18 months after Silent Spring was published. But that was long enough for her to get an idea that she had changed the world. "Silent Spring was a polemic in the best sense. It was meant to be a prophecy," says Carson's biographer Linda Lear.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | January 21, 1999
The World of Rachel CarsonLearn the story of a woman's love for the natural world and her fight to defend it when the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art presents the play "A Sense of Wonder," featuring film, television and Broadway actress Kaiulani Lee Saturday at Parkside High School in Salisbury. After the play walk across the street to the museum to attend a reception and opening of the exhibit "Witness for Nature: The World of Rachel Carson."Museum admission of $7 includes the play, reception and exhibit.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,[Sun writer] | March 4, 2007
One hundred years after her birth and nearly 45 years since publication of her environmental call to action, Silent Spring, Maryland is preparing to honor Rachel Louise Carson. "She's in the pantheon of environmental stars," said state Sen. Brian E. Frosh, who is sponsoring a bill to designate her May 27 birthday as Rachel Carson Day. "Of all the Marylanders who contributed to our well-being and the world's, she's up there." Silent Spring was more than a best-seller. The ground-breaking book made the connection between the indiscriminate use of pesticides, such as DDT, and the destruction of animals and plants.
NEWS
May 27, 2007
No one would be less surprised than Rachel Carson to discover that on today's 100th anniversary of her birth she is still stirring controversy. Her 1962 book Silent Spring, which awakened the nation to the dangers of indiscriminate use of pesticides, brought swift retaliation from the chemical industry, including legal threats and personal demonization. Efforts to discredit her rage on. Inadvertently, though, the Oklahoma senator who blocked a proposal by Maryland lawmakers to formally honor Ms. Carson today has simply called greater attention to her role in helping Americans understand how human activity affects their surroundings.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | May 27, 2007
Let's take a few minutes on this, the 100th birthday of Rachel Carson, to consider the treasures she left us. Of course, we have her trilogy of environmental books --The Sea Around Us,The Edge of the Sea and the 1962 hallmark, Silent Spring. But in the 1930s, she also wrote outdoors articles for The Sun under the byline R.L. Carson. The biologist lived in Maryland for 35 years while attending Johns Hopkins University, teaching at the University of Maryland and writing for what is now called the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
NEWS
By Jeremy Lott and Erin Wildermuth | May 27, 2007
Today is the centenary of Rachel Carson's birth, which has been noted by many environmentalists who cherish her legacy. However, what has been little noted amid the celebrations and commemorations is the dark aspect of that legacy: that Ms. Carson's views led to the banning of pesticides at a cost of many thousands of lives worldwide. In 1948, Swiss chemist Paul Hermann Muller was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine. He was the first non-physician to win in that category - a surprise given the nature of the celebrated discovery.
NEWS
May 13, 2007
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Patuxent Research Refuge will hold a centennial celebration of the birth of environmental pioneer and author Rachel Carson. The celebration is sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Rachel Carson Council. The celebration will begin with a ceremony at 10 a.m. Saturday at the refuge's National Wildlife Visitor Center, near Laurel. After the ceremony, programs will include live animals, hands-on activities, nature hikes and habitat tram tours.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | April 22, 2007
SILVER SPRING -- From a chair in a sun-dappled corner of her back porch, Rachel Carson embraced the birds and flowers around her. But she also envisioned their demise. That fierce love and a sense of dread drove Carson to write Silent Spring, the cornerstone of the environmental movement, even as she battled the breast cancer that would kill her just 18 months after the book's publication in 1962. Her warnings about pesticides such as DDT galvanized a generation of activists, many of whom gathered 37 years ago today for the first Earth Day, a grassroots plea for a cleaner planet.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,[Sun writer] | March 4, 2007
One hundred years after her birth and nearly 45 years since publication of her environmental call to action, Silent Spring, Maryland is preparing to honor Rachel Louise Carson. "She's in the pantheon of environmental stars," said state Sen. Brian E. Frosh, who is sponsoring a bill to designate her May 27 birthday as Rachel Carson Day. "Of all the Marylanders who contributed to our well-being and the world's, she's up there." Silent Spring was more than a best-seller. The ground-breaking book made the connection between the indiscriminate use of pesticides, such as DDT, and the destruction of animals and plants.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | April 22, 2007
SILVER SPRING -- From a chair in a sun-dappled corner of her back porch, Rachel Carson embraced the birds and flowers around her. But she also envisioned their demise. That fierce love and a sense of dread drove Carson to write Silent Spring, the cornerstone of the environmental movement, even as she battled the breast cancer that would kill her just 18 months after the book's publication in 1962. Her warnings about pesticides such as DDT galvanized a generation of activists, many of whom gathered 37 years ago today for the first Earth Day, a grassroots plea for a cleaner planet.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 21, 1997
On anyone's short-list of the important nonfiction books since World War II, two are by Rachel Carson. "The Sea Around Us" (1951) and "Silent Spring" (1962), serialized, were high points in William Shawn's New Yorker tenure; then they spellbound the nation's book readers - and still do. Carson, a marine biologist and the hard-working editor-in-chief of Fish and Wildlife Service publications, lived in Silver Spring. With imperfect health and many family burdens, she was dead of cancer at 56, in 1964.
NEWS
By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | March 4, 2007
Hardy Californians: A Woman's Life With Native Plants Lester Rowntree University of California Press / 310 pages / $19.95 paper Who is the next Rachel Carson? It's a question you hear a lot in environmental circles. Where is the writer who can bridge the gap between poetry and science? Where is the book whose message is so accessible, so imperative, that it inspires not only activism but legislation? In his introduction to the 1994 edition of Silent Spring, Al Gore wrote that it and Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin "rank among the rare books that have transformed our society."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff | March 4, 2007
In 1962, the idea of progress, of modern man striding step by inevitable step up the staircase of history, was virtually unchallenged in the United States. One slim volume changed all that. It was written in Maryland by a woman born 100 years ago this year. Rachel Carson would live for only 18 months after Silent Spring was published. But that was long enough for her to get an idea that she had changed the world. "Silent Spring was a polemic in the best sense. It was meant to be a prophecy," says Carson's biographer Linda Lear.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.