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NEWS
By Steuart Pittman Jr | March 16, 2011
State legislators will decide in the coming days whether to pass Gov. Martin O'Malley's horse racing bill (HB1039/SB848). The legislation creates a process whereby thoroughbred and harness track owners can apply to the state for operating subsidies from slots revenue — if they can demonstrate that the funds are needed to run races. To be approved for these funds, track owners must get business and marketing plans approved by our Maryland Racing Commission. That gives the state and the public input and influence.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
Ron Sanchez's roots in horse racing go deep into his childhood in Caracas, Venezuela, where his maternal grandmother took him to the races every weekend at La Rinconada, the country's largest and oldest track. "I was five years old and we'd walk all the way to the track, it's like two miles," Sanchez recalled Monday at Pimlico. "I fall in love [with horse racing]. Once you get here [to the race track], it's impossible to get out. " Though Sanchez also dreamed of becoming a major league baseball player - he was a member of the Venezuelan national team in his late teens and said he "almost signed" a pro contract - the love of racing never left.
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NEWS
April 3, 1995
After nearly a year of acrimonious debate and various conflicting or incomplete studies, the heads of Harford County and Havre de Grace governments have declared their opposition to a 550-acre motorsports race track proposed for west of the city.Their rejection came even before the track developer purchased the land or applied for rezoning or annexation by Havre de Grace, which (for water and sewage facilities) is essential to his plans.While neither County Executive Eileen Rehrmann nor Mayor Gunther Hirsch has power to veto the speedway plan -- the decision will be up to the city and county councils -- their opposition aims to stop the project dead in its tracks.
NEWS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2013
Gina Riley staked out a spot near the finish line long before the crowds arrived at the Timonium Fairground race track Sunday. She put a blanket on the ground, parked a cooler nearby and sat in the shade of the grandstand. She thought of her son, Bryce, who would have turned 34 Friday. Riley and her husband, Todd Tracey, make this trip every year in honor of Bryce, who had spent his life fighting dermatomyositis, a rare muscle and tissue disease that prevented him from going on rides at the Maryland Fair.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | February 4, 2001
THE latest skirmish in the Battle of Western Maryland ended in a standoff, and a temporary withdrawal of forces. But fear not: The troops seeking to march into Allegany County to build a "little country race track" will be back, armed with more ammunition. So will the foot soldiers opposing this incursion, whose aim is to protect their own tracks in the Baltimore-Washington region. It's a curious conflict. For starters, there's no economic justification for placing a race track in rural Little Orleans.
NEWS
October 5, 1994
A counterfeit $100 bill turned up Sunday at the Laurel Race Track -- passed to a pari-mutuel clerk by a Virginia bettor who insisted that another track clerk had given it to him, authorities said.Western District Officer Jeffrey Little retrieved the bogus bill from the pari-mutuel clerk and turned it over to the Secret Service, which investigates incidents involving counterfeit money.The teller identified a 52-year-old Virginia man as the one who gave her the money, but he in turn said that the bill had been given to him earlier in the day by another clerk.
NEWS
December 15, 1992
Guard hit by truck while directing trafficA Baltimore man was in critical condition yesterday at Prince George's Hospital Center after being hit by a truck in front of the Laurel Race Track Sunday.According to the police report, Charles Dixon, 68, a race track security guard was directing traffic at Race Track Road and Route 198. Mr. Dixon waved the truck through the intersection, but then stepped in front of the truck and was hit.Mr. Dixon, of the first block of Arkla Court, was taken to the Prince George's County hospital's Shock Trauma Center by helicopter.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2010
On Feb. 2, 1961, at 1 p.m., a train carrying fans to Bowie Race Course derailed near the race track, killing six and injuring more than 200. Undaunted, a number of passengers scrambled over the dead and wounded, smashed windows and hurried on foot to Bowie, in 15-degree cold, to place their bets before the first race. One man walked to the track with a broken collarbone. Another limped out of the woods nearby carrying a bag of money and one of his shoes. "I saw people with blood all over them, standing there (at the mutual windows)
NEWS
June 3, 2007
On May 29, 2007, JERRY LEE RUTH, 73, of Owings Mills, born on November 6, 1934 in Baltimore. He was the son of the lovely late Gertrude Koch; husband of Ellen Ruth. Jerry worked on the race track from the 9th grade until he retired. He held various positions on the race track including walker to trainer to jockey. He retired as a VIP Valet parking attendant. He spent his retirement years truly enjoying each and everyday. He is survived by his children, Derrick, Robin, Ginger; step-children, Renie, Ilysa, Tammy and the late Phil; grandchildren, Jordan, Trinity, Brandy, Chelsea, Stephanie and Craig.
NEWS
December 31, 2003
On December 27, 2003 PATRICK J. O'CONNOR, age 51 of Odenton, MD. He is preceded in death by parents John and Leona; son Evan and brother John. he is survived by his fiance' Karen A. Lindsay, of Odenton, MD, son Ryan O'Connor, Satellite Beach, FL; step-children Valarie A. Haislip and Jason N. Lindsay both of Odenton, MD, grandmother Edith Smith, sister Lynn R. Bynaker and brother Robert W. O'Connor all of Henderson, MD and brother Joseph P. O'Connor, Annapolis,...
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
Whether the Grand Prix of Baltimore, which will be run for a third time this Labor Day weekend, can survive depends on two factors: First, drawing and establishing fans of open-wheel racing during a time when the sport has struggled to keep people interested . Second, appeasing downtown businesses hurt by having the streets turned into a race track for the month of August. Organizers have taken many steps toward solving the first problem, moving an area for children inside -- away from the heat and noise -- and promising to book more entertainment options.
NEWS
January 8, 2013
Kudos to The Sun's sports staff and their recent coverage of the grand old Maryland tradition of horse racing ("Digest: Maryland horse wagering rose 7.5 percent in 2012," Jan. 6). Several important stakes races attracting national and international racing stars are being run at Laurel, and it is great that they are getting some coverage. The 15,000 Maryland race track employees, hay growers, vets, farriers and countless fans thank you for this much-needed support. April I. Smith
EXPLORE
By Kevin Leonard | November 27, 2012
Long before there was a Patuxent Greens Golf Course or Stewart Towers high rise building, a mammoth oval race track occupied that area of land off Route 197, near Route 198. Horse racing at Laurel Park racetrack had been ongoing since 1911, but in 1924 an idea was pitched to the public to construct the Baltimore-Washington Speedway, a new wooden track for auto racing. Promoters issued a slick brochure for potential investors, extolling the benefits of the enterprise and describing the proposed track and how investing in it worked.
NEWS
October 1, 2012
Regarding your report that Sparrows Point is again up for sale, due to past uses of the land there's not much that can be done with now. However, it could make an excellent site for a race track. With the Baltimore Grand Prix IndyCar race supposedly a success, maybe it is time to try finding interested parties to operate a track. Sparrows Point can never be turned into housing, but a huge track with bleachers would be perfect. There are many racing enthusiasts in Maryland and many actually race their own vehicles.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2012
The Grand Prix of Baltimore was IndyCar points leader Will Power's chance to wrap up his first title on a street course, the kind of race track that is his forte. He couldn't do it. Now he has to go to Fontana, Calif., to a 500-mile race on an oval. The mere thought of it is enough to make Michael Andretti, who owns the car driven by Power's main foe, Ryan Hunter-Reay, just a little bit cocky. "We're going to win this thing," Andretti said as soon as Sunday's Grand Prix was over and his driver, Hunter-Reay, had won the Baltimore race and closed within 17 points of Power.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
Dyslexia slowed driver Justin Wilson in his pursuit of an education and his auto racing career, but it also was part of the reason he initially spent as much time as he could with the sport and it prepared him for his future. Auto racing provided Wilson a place where his athleticism and coordination took precedence over his ability to make out the meaning of words. "I found out at 13 I had dyslexia," Wilson said between practices for a recent race. "To that point I had struggled at school.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 9, 1993
If the Washington Redskins ever move to a race track, they will be renamed the Laurel And-Hardys.Think of Jack Kent Cooke as the Robert Irsay of D.C. And Merlin as his Ind'nap'lis.Who says we're bush league? Our murder rate is higher than in Miami, Los Angeles, Chicago or New York.An international study says that most of the people employed at American schools are not teachers, as the pupils always suspected.
NEWS
January 8, 2013
Kudos to The Sun's sports staff and their recent coverage of the grand old Maryland tradition of horse racing ("Digest: Maryland horse wagering rose 7.5 percent in 2012," Jan. 6). Several important stakes races attracting national and international racing stars are being run at Laurel, and it is great that they are getting some coverage. The 15,000 Maryland race track employees, hay growers, vets, farriers and countless fans thank you for this much-needed support. April I. Smith
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
A growing number of thoroughbreds are being groomed for new roles following their days on the race track, including assignments as fox hunters, riding horses, pets and show jumpers. Maryland thoroughbred trainer Rodney Jenkins points to the intelligence of a horse as one of the reasons why the animal is able to easily make the transition into the next stage of its life. "It's really a thrilling thing to watch a horse in action," Jenkins said. "They're beautiful animals. They're not dumb.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2012
Before trainer Michael Matz can find out if Union Rags will get the clean trip he failed to get at the Kentucky Derby, the promising colt must hope for some luck with traffic. Union Rags, like all of the horses set to run in the 144th Belmont on Saturday, is due to check in at a newly established stakes barn at the Elmont, N.Y., race track by noon Wednesday. Matz, one of several trainers who questioned the announcement last week of stiff new rules for Belmont hopefuls, is intent on galloping his colt at his Elkton, Md., base before shipping.
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