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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2003
When engine builder Robert Yates decided to become a car owner and build a Winston Cup race team, he did it with the idea that one day maybe his son Doug would want to take over the family business. That's what the father wanted. He just didn't realize how hard it was going to be to give up the keys to the office door. "Certainly, I wanted this for my son," said Yates, 59, whose company, Robert Yates Racing, fields teams for Dale Jarrett and Elliott Sadler, who are in Hampton, Ga., this weekend for Sunday's Atlanta 500. "But you don't know if they really want it. You see people build a wealthy business and kids don't want to touch it. Some of the unhappiest people I've seen are those who have inherited the ship, because it's not about what your ambitions are or were, but about them and their drive."
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SPORTS
By Dan Appenfeller, For The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2013
Wrecked cars and red and yellow flags dominated Saturday's American Le Mans Series race. Three cautions - including the weekend's biggest wreck immediately after the start - whittled the originally two-hour race to just more than an hour. The first wreck came seconds after the green flag waved. Scott Tucker, in the No. 551 Honda in the P1 prototype class, got caught up in a group of cars, some accelerating and others waiting to get through the opening stretch. Several drivers were quick to decry the early acceleration, saying that in a drivers' meeting, they'd made it "very clear" to drive at a slower pace until after the opening straightaway.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1998
INDIANAPOLIS -- Ravens quarterback Jim Harbaugh will be a working stiff tomorrow, down in the pits, holding a sign board for his IndyCar driver, Scott Goodyear.Football personnel and motorsports -- it's beginning to sound like love and marriage. Joe Gibbs, Dan Marino, Walter Payton, Mark Rypien, Jerry Glanville and Joe Montana all have owned one kind of race team or another.Now it's Harbaugh's turn.He is back in Indianapolis getting ready for the 82nd Indianapolis 500 as part-owner of the car that Goodyear will start from the inside of the fourth row."
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2013
Robby Gordon was on his way to winning the 1999 Indianapolis 500. His pit crew kept telling him to keep driving, but as Gordon was less than two laps from getting the checkered flag, he encountered a problem to which many can relate whether they're in a $1 million race car or a rusted clunker. Gordon's car ran out of gas. "I want to sit and cry," Gordon said that day. While one of the universal goals of racing is what race team strategists like Target Chip Ganassi's Mike Hull, whose driver, Scott Dixon, won the pole for today's race, call "full to finish" - having just enough gas left in the tank to get to the end - decisions about when to pit and when to pass often makes the difference between winning and losing.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | March 6, 1993
Joe Gibbs may have caught the NFL off guard yesterday when he announced his retirement as Washington Redskins coach, but in the garages at Richmond (Va.) International Raceway, crew chief Jimmy Makar wasn't surprised."I saw it coming for a long while," said Makar, who runs Gibbs' Winston Cup stock car team. "And he's been thinking about it ever since the NFL season ended. It wasn't a snap decision by any means. He's been thinking about it a long time."Makar said that in particular, Gibbs had talked about wanting to spend more time with his family.
SPORTS
By Stanley Dillon and Stanley Dillon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 1996
Judd Shepard is working hard to achieve his goal of racing sprint cars professionally. Despite the ups and downs that he has encountered in his brief career, the young Hampstead driver has never given up.Judd is the brother of Jeff Shepard, the local sprint car driver from Finksburg who now races professionally with the Club All Star Circuit of Champions and the World of Outlaws, two professional touring sprint car organizations. It has always been Judd's dream to follow in his brother's footsteps.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1998
The NAACP formally recognized the Dr Pepper Co. yesterday for its sponsorship of the only wholly owned black race team in NASCAR.The team, owned by former Baltimore Colt Joe Washington and Basketball Hall of Famer Julius Erving, ran the entire NASCAR Busch Grand National Series during the 1998 season. It was the first team wholly owned by African-Americans to finish a season since the late Wendell Scott did it 25 years ago."We look at Dr Pepper as the Branch Rickey of NASCAR," Washington said, referring to the Brooklyn Dodgers general manager who brought Jackie Robinson to the major leagues in 1947.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | June 5, 1995
DOVER, Del. -- If anyone needed a victory in the Miller Genuine Draft 500 yesterday, Kyle Petty and his crew chief Barry Dodson did.It had been two years since Petty had won a race. The lack of success had been especially hard on Dodson, who wanted a victory in memory of his two children, who were killed in a car accident nearly seven months ago.And so, with a record crowd of 101,000 packed into Dover International Speedway, Petty and his Grand Prix dominated the race.Petty led 271 laps and beat Bobby Labonte's Monte Carlo to the finish line by .22 of a second.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | December 27, 2003
Larry McReynolds, the well-respected former NASCAR crew chief and now Fox television commentator, had seen and heard of a lot of rich men who wanted to talk about starting a race team, but had quickly faded from the scene. Talk is, as the saying goes, cheap. Owning a race team isn't. So, when a man named Alex Meshkin approached him, wanting to talk about starting a race team, McReynolds wasn't really interested. "I thought it was just another one of those people," McReynolds said. When McReynolds learned Meshkin, a Maryland native, was 23, well, you can imagine.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1995
Roy Kidwell won't have to keep an eye on a sirloin steak sizzling on his barbecue grill this Independence Day.Instead, the Chartwell resident will be watching a kitchen wall clock installed in a 1934 Dodge rumble seat coupe and helping to keep his race team on time.Mr. Kidwell and five other Maryland residents will be participating in the Interstate Batteries Great North American Race, a road-rally-style contest for pre-World War II automobiles.This year the course runs from Toronto to Mexico City.
SPORTS
By Seth Boster, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2013
A major league pitcher sat on one end of a couch at a downtown hotel earlier this month, turning toward an inconspicuous 20-year-old on the other side. “I have a question,” said C.J. Wilson, the Los Angeles Angels left-hander. “How convinced were you getting into the car for the first time on the track that this was a good idea?” Wilson - sitting over a plate of bacon and eggs during a break in his team's series with the Orioles earlier this month - looked to the driver on his professional race team.
SPORTS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2012
While Olympic gymnast Gabby Douglas and swimmer Katie Ledecky proved to the world what a little girl power could do in London this summer, a group of women racecar drivers prepared to show the Grand Prix of Baltimore what they could do with a little horsepower. Emilee Tominovich of Clarksville and her TrueCar Racing teammates are the only all-female team to compete in six different racing series, including two featured in the city's stop along the Mazda Road to Indy. Mont Brownlee's 5-year-old daughter, Adella, smiled when she learned about the women drivers, as she fought a losing battle with her melting ice cream.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 31, 2012
So racing returns to downtown streets today, as the Grand Prix of Baltimore takes over the Inner Harbor and Camden Yards through Sunday. The new organizers of the revived racing festival have managed to avoid the tempest over tree removal that dogged the runup to last year's inaugural event.  But they've also dropped any pretense of reducing or mitigating the noise, unfiltered racecar exhaust and other environmental impacts of the extravaganza....
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
A.J. Foyt, Indy car racing's all-time winningest driver (67) and championship record holder (7), is now 77. He's had open heart surgery, and in January went through an illness that nearly killed him. But here he is, alive, opinonated and planning to get his race team back among the top teams in the IndyCar Series. In a recent one-on-one interview Foyt talked about many things, among them why the 1977 Indy 500 win was special to him beyond making him the first driver to win the race four times, the recent announcement that he'll field a car for minority driver Chase Austin in the Indianapolis 500 next May and a recent staph infection following same-day surgeries to remove bone spurs from his artificial knee and repair a rotator cuff.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
WASHINGTON, D.C. - Dario Franchitti can't avoid talking about his race team's early season troubles and his hopes of getting his Chip Ganassi Dallara-Honda sorted out in time to win Sunday's Indianapolis 500. But Monday, while making the rounds with various media outlets, he was just as interested in chatting about the Baltimore Grand Prix, which has had its own troubles. It seems both the IndyCar driver and the race are coming from behind. "Is everything going well for Baltimore's race now?"
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
Before glossy race cars careen around downtown streets over Labor Day weekend, another high-speed race must be run. The team promoting Baltimore's Grand Prix - a group announced by city officials this week after the collapse of two other race organizers - has less than four months to hawk sponsorships, market the event, sell tickets and set up the racecourse and grandstands. Sports marketing experts say Race On, the new organizers that include racing champion Michael Andretti, must make those tasks their top priorities and also reassure racing fans that the event is on despite months of setbacks.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
WASHINGTON, D.C. - Dario Franchitti can't avoid talking about his race team's early season troubles and his hopes of getting his Chip Ganassi Dallara-Honda sorted out in time to win Sunday's Indianapolis 500. But Monday, while making the rounds with various media outlets, he was just as interested in chatting about the Baltimore Grand Prix, which has had its own troubles. It seems both the IndyCar driver and the race are coming from behind. "Is everything going well for Baltimore's race now?"
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 22, 2008
In movies like The Bank Job, Jason Statham has shown the potential to be a British Steve McQueen, but he'll never get the chance if he keeps making gobblers like Death Race. It's strictly a smash-and-grab variation on the campy 1975 cult hit Death Race 2000, this time setting a souped-up destruction-derby auto race, played to the death, on the grounds of Terminal Island, a prison for extreme violent offenders. "This had action right from the beginning," I heard one satisfied viewer say on the way out. Actually, most of the time it only has an illusion of action.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
Sixteen years after competing in his first motorsports race on the Camden Yards parking lot, Monkton professional driver Marc Bunting is returning to the drivers' seat and his roots. Bunting is putting together Team Baltimore Racing, a sports car team, that will compete in the American Le Mans Series race here Sept. 2 as part of the Baltimore Grand Prix weekend. "With the Baltimore race happening, it renewed my interest," said Bunting, 42. "It will be fun to race around Baltimore — legally.
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