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By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2001
YORK, Pa. - Mayor Charlie Robertson was arrested and charged with murder yesterday in the ambush-style shooting of a black preacher's daughter during race riots that swept through this blue-collar town 32 years ago. The retired police patrolman of 29 years and two-term mayor was booked, handcuffed and released on $50,000 bail. He is charged with criminal homicide for inciting violence at a time when police and National Guard troops were dispatched throughout York to calm the tension. He is also accused of distributing ammunition to white gang members who a day later gunned down Lillie Belle Allen as her family unknowingly drove into a hostile white neighborhood.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 23, 2013
My parents voted for Richard Nixon in the 1960 presidential election. I had not yet developed a political worldview, but as a freshman at American University in Washington, D.C., I stayed up late to watch the election returns slowly trickle in before going to bed at 2 a.m. with the outcome still undecided. The following year I was hired as a copyboy at NBC News, delivering wire service "copy" to news reporters in the network's Washington bureau. White House correspondent Sander Vanocur invited me to accompany him to observe the swearing-in of Adlai Stevenson as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.
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NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2001
YORK, Pa. - In more than seven hours of witness testimony, attorneys representing six of the nine white men charged in the 1969 race riot killing of Lillie Belle Allen offered a stunning display yesterday of the effect of time on the unsolved murder case. The lead state police investigator has Alzheimer's disease and can't remember anything about the months he spent trying to determine who killed the 27-year-old daughter of a black preacher as race riots swept through this blue-collar southern Pennsylvania city.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2012
When an African-American was accused of raping a white woman and another of murdering a white locomotive engineer, Springfield, Ill., exploded into a race riot on the evening of Aug. 14, 1908. The mob grew furious when they learned that the two men had been spirited away to Bloomington, Ill., by the sheriff. Sensing trouble, Gov. Charles S. Deneen sent the National Guard to the city to restore order, but the rioters were not to be stopped. After destroying a small black business district, the mob turned its fury on Badlands, a black neighborhood, where they burned some 40 homes while a crowd of 5,000 spectators looked on. An African-American barber who had tried to defend his shop was lynched.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 4, 1992
IF ALLAN LICHTMAN is right, George Bush better hope and pray the L.A. riot is not the beginning of "sustained social unrest." If it is, Bush gets beat in November, according to Professor Lichtman's never-fail formula for predicting presidential elections.Lichtman's formula involves 13 "keys" to an election. If an incumbent's party's nominee gets eight of them, he wins. Last month Lichtman, of American University, told the Christian Science Monitor that he calculates Bush has eight keys and so should be re-elected if nothing changes.
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2004
Late in the 19th century, a strange fruit began appearing on trees in the South. The dangling bodies of black victims of lynching signaled the end of Reconstruction and the rise of the Ku Klux Klan. By the early 20th century, the racial violence had extended beyond the South. A race riot in Springfield, Ill., in 1908 spurred a group of progressive blacks and whites to band together to fight racial violence. The next year, they founded the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
NEWS
October 29, 1996
AMERICANS SHOULD know by now that race riots aren't really about the specific incident that sparked the violence. The National Guard had to be brought in after 11 people were injured during rioting in St. Petersburg, Fla., that followed the fatal shooting Thursday of a black motorist by a white police officer. African Americans questioned not only the officer's need to shoot the unarmed man, but also whether they could expect justice if the policeman did wrong.That skepticism isn't about one police officer who may have made a mistake; it's about a lack of faith in an American criminal justice system that 30 years after the civil rights movement is still viewed as racist by many blacks.
NEWS
By ANDREW TODD REINER | June 22, 1992
These are terrible times, Dr. Hoke Smith reminded the TowsonState University class of 1992. Between the impending AIDS epidemic, the malignant health of the earth, the congressional check-bounding charade, the race riots in Los Angeles, and, of course, the recession, the future looks bleak.His remedy for these ills was, simply, for graduates to ''stay in school.''When he smiled after this comment, and then paused as if waiting for the expected laughter, I knew this remark was made in half-jest, intended to lighten the mood with its touch of irony.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | October 22, 2006
DETROIT -- Next door to Comerica Park sits St. John's Episcopal Church, where an electronic sign beckons with bright orange letters, "Pray here for the Tigers." The plea should erase any doubt that religion and baseball intersect sharply in the Motor City. But the role sports plays - the role the Tigers play - can be a bit tougher to dissect. The electricity that flowed through the stadium for last night's World Series opener was evident - so evident, in fact, that first glance would lead you to believe it lit up the whole neighborhood.
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | April 11, 1993
Sidney Dickson is a bear of a man who can't quite get hi mind to stay focused on everyday life. Life, for this Marylander, is to be lived, not watched. So, on Saturday, he will ease his ample body behind the wheel of a red, white and blue 1968 Rambler American, press the gas pedal with his size-13 1/2 shoe and set off to race halfway around the world.In 30 days.From London to Sydney, Australia, he will rumble in the 25th anniversary run of the 10,000-mile London-Sydney Marathon.The last time Mr. Dickson decided to do this, the world was an easier place on which to race.
NEWS
By Nicholas Soi and Robyn Dixon and Nicholas Soi and Robyn Dixon,Los Angeles Times | December 30, 2007
KIBERA, Kenya -- Machete-wielding youths rioted in Kenya yesterday as each party vying for the presidency declared its candidate the winner, threatening an election that was initially praised by international observers. In early results, challenger Raila Odinga had led President Mwai Kibaki by several hundred thousand votes, but by late yesterday, Odinga's lead had dwindled. Amid opposition accusations of fraud, ethnic riots exploded in several cities. In Odinga's strongholds, supporters from his Luo tribe looted businesses and set fire to shops and houses belonging to Kikuyus, the tribe associated with Kibaki.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | October 22, 2006
DETROIT -- Next door to Comerica Park sits St. John's Episcopal Church, where an electronic sign beckons with bright orange letters, "Pray here for the Tigers." The plea should erase any doubt that religion and baseball intersect sharply in the Motor City. But the role sports plays - the role the Tigers play - can be a bit tougher to dissect. The electricity that flowed through the stadium for last night's World Series opener was evident - so evident, in fact, that first glance would lead you to believe it lit up the whole neighborhood.
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2004
Late in the 19th century, a strange fruit began appearing on trees in the South. The dangling bodies of black victims of lynching signaled the end of Reconstruction and the rise of the Ku Klux Klan. By the early 20th century, the racial violence had extended beyond the South. A race riot in Springfield, Ill., in 1908 spurred a group of progressive blacks and whites to band together to fight racial violence. The next year, they founded the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 14, 2002
YORK, Pa. -- Six white men who admitted their roles in the race-riot shooting of a black preacher's daughter here more than 33 years ago received sentences yesterday of up to three years in prison. The sentencing followed an emotional, five-hour hearing during which relatives of Lillie Belle Allen, who was shot to death during the July 1969 riot, faced the defendants and grilled each about his involvement in the killing. They also asked why the six men had not more fully apologized and questioned the sincerity of regrets offered only during plea hearings and yesterday's sentencing.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 18, 2002
YORK, Pa. - A packed courtroom watched yesterday as lawyers closed out the Lillie Belle Allen murder case in dramatic fashion, with defense attorneys arguing that prosecutors had left "mountains of reasonable doubt" without coming close to proving their case and prosecutors belittling defendants' claims that they shot the black preacher's daughter in self-defense during 11 days of racial strife in 1969. "There is no `it-was-a-riot' defense. There is no `it-was-a-crazy-time' defense," lead prosecutor Thomas H. Kelley told the jury, playing down suggestions by lawyers for former Mayor Charlie Robertson and two other defendants that jurors should consider the "different values" and "limited social conscience" of three decades ago in rendering their verdict.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 5, 2002
YORK, Pa. - When a onetime gang member testified last year that former Mayor Charlie Robertson had tossed him a box of bullets and told him to kill black people during a deadly race riot in 1969, Robertson's attorneys dismissed the story as the testimony of a heavy-drinking, drug-abusing witness who struck a deal. Yesterday, another former gang member backed him up. "Charlie asked us if we were OK with our ammunition," former Newberry Street Boys member Arthur N. "Artie" Messersmith testified, adding that Robertson gave bullets to Girarder Rick L. Knouse and maybe another friend.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | November 21, 1996
PITTSBURGH -- One day the editors of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette were having their usual morning news meeting when they noticed something curious.''Every one of the major stories of the day was related, in one way or another, to race,'' Madelyne ''Maddy'' Ross, the newspaper's managing editor, recalls.The biggest powder keg was the case of Jonny Gammage, 31, who investigators say suffocated in a scuffle with officers during a traffic stop. The three officers were charged with involuntary manslaughter.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | February 28, 2001
"We have all been affected by the black experience in America," Scott Ellsworth told the group of students in the McDonogh School chapel. The man making the pronouncement Monday afternoon was middle-aged -- he'll turn 47 in March -- with a head that seemed to have brusquely pushed all the hair toward the back, save for the wisps of gray at the temple and the remaining slab of black running around the sides. He also was white, talking to a group of predominantly white students at a school that didn't allow its first black student until 1959.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 24, 2002
YORK, Pa. - Thirty-three years after a black minister's daughter was shot to death during race riots in this blue-collar town, lawyers began choosing a jury yesterday to hear the murder case against three white men, including a former York mayor. After more than five hours of questioning, defense attorneys and prosecutors had settled on one juror - a corrections officer at the York County Prison who had been incarcerated as a juvenile. Court officials estimate that it could take nine more days to choose the remaining 11 jurors and six alternates who will decide the fate of two-term mayor and retired police officer Charlie Robertson and his co-defendants, Robert N. Messersmith and Gregory H. Neff.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2001
YORK, PA. - Ruling that the prosecution of nine white men for the ambush killing of a black minister's daughter in 1969 has been delayed long enough, a Pennsylvania judge ordered yesterday that the murder trial of Mayor Charlie Robertson and his co-defendants go forward. Defense attorneys had argued that charges should be dropped because the 32-year delay in prosecution had violated the defendants' due-process rights and because fading memories, lost evidence and the deaths of potential witnesses made it impossible for them to get a fair trial.
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