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By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1998
LA ROCHELLE, France -- When crews in the Whitbread race finally cross the English Channel and lay eyes on the shores of Britain -- a sight they haven't witnessed since starting the around-the-world race nine months ago -- an odd thing could happen.They may all turn around.Only 450 miles are left in this punishing endurance contest, whose last leg begins today off La Rochelle and is set to finish tomorrow afternoon in Southampton, England. But after nearly 31,600 miles of dead-serious sailing, the last miles could prove downright kooky.
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SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
In the command center of the Grand Prix of Baltimore, Tim Mayer, the race's general manager, fielded a few phone calls, answering a couple of questions. But that was it. Preparations for the Grand Prix were running several hours ahead of schedule the day before Friday's qualifying races. In the cavernous room - Mayer asked that its location not be divulged - police and others studied 15 big-screen televisions showing camera feeds and maps. "It's not like it was last year," he said.
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1996
A wagering foul-up at Laurel Park last week that infuriated bettors was, according to racing officials, an inadvertent human error.A horse presumably scratched from Friday's 10th race was reinstated with no announcement. Many bettors did not realize the No. 13 horse, Honey's Acallade, was running. Although she was 7-2 in the morning line, she paid a glaring $45.80 after winning by a neck.James Mango, Maryland Jockey Club chief administrative officer, and Kenneth A. Schertle, executive director of the Maryland Racing Commission, said this week that their investigations uncovered no fraud.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
The construction time of this year's Grand Prix of Baltimore course has been reduced by 10 days, softening the effects on city traffic and downtown businesses, officials for the Labor Day weekend event announced Tuesday. General manager Tim Mayer said race organizers and city officials collaborated on a plan to close entire blocks at night and in the early morning, allowing workers to build the 12-turn, two-mile track from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. on most days. This approach, instead of closing single lanes during higher-traffic periods, will shorten construction from 31 days to 21. "We didn't expect we'd be able to do that, but it was our goal to minimize the impact on the people of Baltimore," Mayer said Tuesday, when race officials held a ceremonial dropping of a jersey wall that will line the course.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | November 8, 1994
The board of directors of Whitbread Chesapeake, Inc., the nonprofit organization formed recently to bring the next Whitbread Round the World Race to Baltimore and Annapolis, held a briefing yesterday on its preliminary plans for a week of festivities in spring 1998."
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1999
To prevent a power outage of the kind that threw the annual Preakness race into darkness last year, the owners of the Pimlico Race Course in Northwest Baltimore have installed five backup generators in tractor-trailers around the park.Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. has also spent more than a million dollars to replace three electrical transformers, a switching device and underground cable to prevent a recurrence of last year's blackout, according to utility and race officials.The running of the 124th Preakness Stakes will take place Saturday.
SPORTS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1998
The visit to Baltimore and Annapolis in the Whitbread Round the World Race has been a success on so many major counts -- there were spectators, there was publicity, there was even wind -- that some race officials feel almost certain the international competition will return to the Chesapeake."
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2004
All week, Sally Barkow won in the heat, in the cold and in the rain. Yesterday, the sailor from Wisconsin won the ISAF Women's Match Racing World Championship without wind. As midday turned to late afternoon on the final day of competition, the 6-knot breezes that had filled the sails of all four semifinalists died as if choked off at the source. That left Barkow, France's Claire Leroy and the other match pair of Betsy Alison of Rhode Island and Bermuda's Paula Lewin bobbing in the waters off Lake Ogleton, just south of Annapolis.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1999
When the fleet in the Around Alone sailing race started Leg 3 in Auckland, New Zealand, last weekend, Fedor Konioukhov had been in port for only a week and Robin Davie was still more than two days from finishing Leg 2.Under race rules, the Russian adventurer and the merchant seaman from Charleston, S.C., were ineligible to continue in the race. But Davie and Konioukhov apparently don't know when to quit.Konioukhov already has put to sea again as a non-competitor following the fleet, three days and 400 miles behind the last-place boat.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1998
Baltimore is nearly a lock to again play host to what is now called the Volvo Ocean Race, Round the World, but if the world's top racing yachts return in 2002, chances are they won't stop in Annapolis, according to sources close to the event.The two stops so close together proved tiring and costly for the racers. Each syndicate spent tens of thousands of dollars in logistical costs -- for such things as moving supplies and equipment -- to make the second stop in Annapolis. Baltimore's Inner Harbor would be the preferred location because of its ability to handle crowds and because of intense media attention, one official said.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
The downtown streets that double as the course for the Grand Prix of Baltimore have provided IndyCar driver Will Power with bittersweet memories over the first two years of the event. In the race's inaugural running in 2011, Power started on the pole and led for 70 of the 75 laps en route to his sixth victory of the season. "It was not that straightforward; it was one of my best wins that I'll always remember," Power recalled Monday during a publicity tour in Baltimore for next month's race.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
On the third Saturday in May, generations of Baltimoreans marched onto the infield at Pimlico Race Course with their coolers in tow, an image that helped define the Preakness Stakes. No longer. The Maryland Jockey Club has unveiled enhanced security plans for the 138th Preakness Stakes in the wake of recent deadly bombings at the Boston Marathon. And coolers are among the casualties. Fans will be subject to electronic wand searches at all gates for the Black-Eyed Susan Stakes on May 17 and the Preakness on May 18. They will not be allowed to carry backpacks or duffel bags into the races and only smaller, see-through-plastic containers will be permitted.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2013
Volvo Ocean Race organizers wanted to come to Baltimore in May 2015 as part of their 'round-the-world competition but had one request: Could it share the spotlight with the Preakness Stakes or bump the Triple Crown horse race to another date? The city said thanks, but no way. So Tuesday, the only U.S. stopover of the Volvo went instead to Newport, R.I. "We were shocked," said Robert Housman, executive director of Ocean Racing USA, the Baltimore bidder. "It would be discouraging to work hard on something and lose, but clearly they moved the finish line.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
Although organizers of this year's Grand Prix of Baltimore got a late start — taking over with a little more than 100 days to spare — they say the event will run more smoothly because of lessons learned from last year. Over the past few months, new operator Race On LLC has tweaked the event plan, responding to issues such as complaints that roadside barriers limited access to Oriole Park at Camden Yards and that downtown restaurants saw little spillover business during the 2011 inaugural race.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
Maryland horse racing got exposed for a lack of oversight Tuesday during an appeal to have the Rick Dutrow-trained King and Crusader reinstated as the winner of the $75,000 Maryland Juvenile Championship at Laurel Park. Dutrow and his horse's owner James Riccio lost the appeal, but Maryland horse racing may have lost more, as officials at Laurel Park were found to have not followed all of the proper procedures on the night of that December race. "I'm stabled at Laurel Park," said John Robb, the trainer of Glib, the second-place finisher who was declared the winner of the Juvenile Championship.
SPORTS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2011
IndyCar racing officials and Baltimore's mayor said Thursday they are still committed to holding another Grand Prix, even though the company that runs the event is millions of dollars past due on its bills and is weighing a takeover proposal from a local financier. Terry Angstadt, president of IndyCar's commercial division, expressed confidence in the management team that has proposed buying a controlling stake in Baltimore Racing Development Inc., the event organizer. But he added that he's not endorsing any particular bidder.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | January 25, 1994
The Crofton Civic Association voted 9-1 last night to sponsor the annual Labor Day bicycle races in the community despite an accident last year that left a local man's arm nearly severed. Community leaders and a race official said they saw no reason not tobring the event back for Crofton's 30th anniversary celebration."We thought about not having the race," said Jeff Warren, a member of Team Snow Valley, an Annapolis-based racing group that promotes the event. "It was a serious accident. But we believe there is no reason not to continue the race."
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1999
Baltimore and Annapolis will again play host to the Volvo Ocean Race Round the World when the racing vessels set sail to circle the globe in 2001-2002, Volvo and local race officials will announce today.Propelled by the success of the 1998 stopover, the region beat out New York, Boston and Newport, R.I., to be the second U.S. stopover port next race. Competing to be the first U.S. stop are Charleston, S.C., and Miami. The selection of one of those cities is to be announced tomorrow. Fort Lauderdale, Fla., which played host to the racers in 1994 and 1998, is no longer in that competition.
NEWS
By Jay Davidson | December 4, 2011
The dust has settled on the inaugural Baltimore Grand Prix, an event that I and several others lived and breathed over the past two-plus years. I acknowledge that I am not objective, having invested substantial money, effort and reputation as the "face of the race" since I began working on this challenging project in 2008. Like most of my investor partners, my primary goal was to bring a world-class event to Baltimore in the hope of changing certain perceptions about our city. Despite the many naysayers, I think it is fair to say that the great majority of the 160,000 people who attended over Labor Day weekend viewed the event as a fantastic success.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2010
The owners of Maryland's two major thoroughbred tracks proposed Friday to run 77 days of live racing next year at Laurel Park and Pimlico Race Course that would conclude after the Preakness Stakes in May. Meanwhile, the tracks' minority owner, Penn National Gaming, said it would pursue slots at Laurel Park, which means lobbying to change the state constitution to allow a second casino in Anne Arundel County when the General Assembly reconvenes next...
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