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NEWS
August 1, 2013
I agreed with almost everything that Thomas F. Schaller said in his recent column on race relations ("A welcome call for soul-searching about race," July 24). I think he was correct in writing that President Barack Obama "cannot be easily dismissed with the usual racial tropes. That is, so long as he keeps his mouth shut about race matters, which for most of his presidency he has. " President Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder, in their positions, have sworn to defend the U.S. Constitution and uphold the laws of this country, including our system of jurisprudence.
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NEWS
August 1, 2013
I agreed with almost everything that Thomas F. Schaller said in his recent column on race relations ("A welcome call for soul-searching about race," July 24). I think he was correct in writing that President Barack Obama "cannot be easily dismissed with the usual racial tropes. That is, so long as he keeps his mouth shut about race matters, which for most of his presidency he has. " President Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder, in their positions, have sworn to defend the U.S. Constitution and uphold the laws of this country, including our system of jurisprudence.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 29, 2003
WASHINGTON - Race matters. Boil it down, and that's what the milestone Supreme Court rulings in the University of Michigan case reduce to, an acknowledgement of the obvious. Not that the rulings were one-sided. As you surely know by now, justices struck down a formula that awarded a certain number of points toward undergraduate admission to applicants based upon race. But at the same time, and to the relief of affirmative action advocates, the court affirmed that race can be taken into account in college admissions.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | July 23, 2013
President Barack Obama is right: All Americans could benefit from some soul-searching about race in America. This is not a message that many white Americans - or many nonwhite Americans - want to hear. The only thing people like less than being told to do some soul-searching is being told they're racist. In his speech last week following the George Zimmerman trial verdict, the president didn't use the term "racist," even if the label accurately applies to more of us than we care to admit.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | August 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - Ward Connerly says he wants to get rid of racial classifications, but he really doesn't. At least, he didn't sound like he did in a recent telephone conversation I had with the California businessman and famous foe of affirmative action. Mr. Connerly, you will recall, gained national fame with his successful campaign to pass California's anti-affirmative action "Proposition 209" five years ago. Now, the founder of the American Civil Rights Coalition is taking his crusade for "color-blind" government a giant step further: He is trying to put an initiative on California's November, 2002, ballot that will get rid of what he calls "those silly little boxes" on state government forms that ask for your race.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | July 23, 2013
President Barack Obama is right: All Americans could benefit from some soul-searching about race in America. This is not a message that many white Americans - or many nonwhite Americans - want to hear. The only thing people like less than being told to do some soul-searching is being told they're racist. In his speech last week following the George Zimmerman trial verdict, the president didn't use the term "racist," even if the label accurately applies to more of us than we care to admit.
NEWS
By Robert S. Boyd | October 13, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Thanks to spectacular advances in molecular biology and genetics, most scientists now reject the concept of race as a valid way to divide human beings into separate groups.Contrary to widespread public opinion, researchers no longer believe that races are distinct biological categories created by differences in the genes that people inherit from their parents. Genes vary, they say, but not in ways that correspond to the popular notion of black, white, yellow, red or brown races.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 21, 2002
METUCHEN, N.J. - Beverly Sarnicola has watched over the past month as the Senate race in her state has turned upside-down in the most extraordinary of ways. In a virtually unprecedented candidate swap three weeks ago - 36 days before Election Day - scandal-singed Democratic Sen. Robert G. Torricelli stepped out of the race and Democrats waged a successful legal battle to replace him on the ballot with retired 18-year Senate veteran Frank R. Lautenberg. Republicans looked on with horror as the double-digit poll lead of their candidate, newcomer Douglas R. Forrester, quickly evaporated, and Lautenberg, 78, who some still think is a senator, moved ahead.
NEWS
December 5, 2006
It's been quite a while since the U.S. Supreme Court has wrestled with desegregation in elementary and secondary schools, but a pair of cases heard yesterday puts the court back in the middle of this contentious issue. The justices are considering whether school systems can voluntarily take race into account to promote diversity among school populations without violating the Constitution. We think the answer should be yes. School assignment plans in two districts are before the court. In Seattle, students could attend one of 10 public high schools in different parts of the city, but they had to apply for their school of choice.
NEWS
May 3, 1994
On the same day the Supreme Court ruled that the Constitution prohibits excluding women or men from juries because of their sex, the U.S. Senate was giving a demonstration that sometimes men and women see things quite differently. All seven women senators voted against letting Adm. Frank Kelso retire with four-star rank. Men senators were divided. In one sense this justifies those dissenters from the Supreme Court ruling, who argued that a person's sex has been demonstrated to be predictive in some jury trials and that therefore courtroom lawyers should be allowed to use the"peremptory challenge" -- one without cause -- to exclude as many men or as many women as possible.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and John Fritze and Doug Donovan and John Fritze,Sun Reporters | January 6, 2007
Three-term Baltimore City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. said yesterday that he is running for mayor and will officially launch his candidacy the day after his chief opponent, Sheila Dixon, is publicly sworn in to the position. The Democratic councilman said in an interview with The Sun that he will formally kick off his campaign for the 2007 election on Jan. 19 - the same week Martin O'Malley becomes governor and Council President Dixon begins to serve out the remainder of his mayoral term.
NEWS
December 5, 2006
It's been quite a while since the U.S. Supreme Court has wrestled with desegregation in elementary and secondary schools, but a pair of cases heard yesterday puts the court back in the middle of this contentious issue. The justices are considering whether school systems can voluntarily take race into account to promote diversity among school populations without violating the Constitution. We think the answer should be yes. School assignment plans in two districts are before the court. In Seattle, students could attend one of 10 public high schools in different parts of the city, but they had to apply for their school of choice.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 29, 2003
WASHINGTON - Race matters. Boil it down, and that's what the milestone Supreme Court rulings in the University of Michigan case reduce to, an acknowledgement of the obvious. Not that the rulings were one-sided. As you surely know by now, justices struck down a formula that awarded a certain number of points toward undergraduate admission to applicants based upon race. But at the same time, and to the relief of affirmative action advocates, the court affirmed that race can be taken into account in college admissions.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 21, 2002
METUCHEN, N.J. - Beverly Sarnicola has watched over the past month as the Senate race in her state has turned upside-down in the most extraordinary of ways. In a virtually unprecedented candidate swap three weeks ago - 36 days before Election Day - scandal-singed Democratic Sen. Robert G. Torricelli stepped out of the race and Democrats waged a successful legal battle to replace him on the ballot with retired 18-year Senate veteran Frank R. Lautenberg. Republicans looked on with horror as the double-digit poll lead of their candidate, newcomer Douglas R. Forrester, quickly evaporated, and Lautenberg, 78, who some still think is a senator, moved ahead.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | August 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - Ward Connerly says he wants to get rid of racial classifications, but he really doesn't. At least, he didn't sound like he did in a recent telephone conversation I had with the California businessman and famous foe of affirmative action. Mr. Connerly, you will recall, gained national fame with his successful campaign to pass California's anti-affirmative action "Proposition 209" five years ago. Now, the founder of the American Civil Rights Coalition is taking his crusade for "color-blind" government a giant step further: He is trying to put an initiative on California's November, 2002, ballot that will get rid of what he calls "those silly little boxes" on state government forms that ask for your race.
NEWS
By Robert S. Boyd | October 13, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Thanks to spectacular advances in molecular biology and genetics, most scientists now reject the concept of race as a valid way to divide human beings into separate groups.Contrary to widespread public opinion, researchers no longer believe that races are distinct biological categories created by differences in the genes that people inherit from their parents. Genes vary, they say, but not in ways that correspond to the popular notion of black, white, yellow, red or brown races.
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