Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRace For Governor
IN THE NEWS

Race For Governor

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | May 15, 1994
Well-heeled dark horse Stewart Bainum Jr. officially joins the race for governor of Maryland tomorrow, trumpeting his belated entrance into the crowded field of Democratic hopefuls with a monthlong fanfare of television commercials to propel him from the starting gate.Besides showcasing Mr. Bainum, the ads highlight a new dynamic in the campaign -- personal wealth and the willingness to use it. The multimillionaire Montgomery County businessman hopes they will be the great equalizer, making up for his relative political obscurity and entry a scant four months before the Sept.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
Democrat Douglas F. Gansler sharpened his public attacks against rival Anthony G. Brown, charging Wednesday that his chief political opponent "did absolutely nothing" during his tenure as lieutenant governor and failed at the two main tasks he was given. During a radio interview on "The Marc Steiner Show," Gansler called the state's work to prepare for an influx of military workers "an unmitigated disaster" and again criticized Brown for the failed rollout of Maryland's health insurance website, two projects that Brown oversaw.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and C. Fraser Smith and Craig Timberg and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1997
Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker, a Republican known for his blend of folksy wit and fiscal savvy, will formally enter the race for governor with an announcement in Ellicott City on Wednesday.Republican Party leaders consider Ecker, 68, a long shot against 1994 gubernatorial nominee Ellen R. Sauerbrey, 60. Even some of his closest allies in Howard tried to talk him out of running after a poll in July showed Sauerbrey's popularity high among party faithful.Ecker was an untried political player in 1990 when he upset an incumbent county executive.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
The first negative advertisements in the Democratic primary campaign for governor hit airwaves this week, pushing a feisty political fight that's simmered for months into prime time. Already, the race among Democrats for the governor's mansion is poised to be Maryland's nastiest in two decades, experts said. And voters can expect the candidates with enough money to use it increasingly on negative messages until the June 24 primary. "It's a surprise that it didn't happen earlier," said Donald F. Norris, chairman of the public policy department at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Thomas W. Waldron and Robert Timberg and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writer John W. Frece contributed to this article | November 1, 1994
With a week to go until Election Day, Democrat Parris N. Glendening is intensifying his efforts to turn out voters, while Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey is striving to elevate her profile in Montgomery County, where the race for governor may well be decided.Both candidates are also jamming the airwaves, both radio and television, though the better-financed Mr. Glendening will be able to broadcast twice as many TV ads in the populous Baltimore and Washington areas as Mrs. Sauerbrey in the final week.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and Robert Timberg and John W. Frece and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writers Peter Jensen and Rafael Alvarez contributed to this article | September 15, 1994
Ellen R. Sauerbrey won the Republican nomination for governor by grabbing voters by the pocketbook, promising them tax relief and a smaller government in a message both clear and consistent.She started campaigning early, never wavered, and in the end energized the conservative voters most likely to turn out in a GOP primary, including gun rights advocates, anti-abortion Christians and tax rebels.Helen Delich Bentley lost Tuesday's primary because she ran an aloof, almost arrogant campaign in which she seemed more interested in being anointed than elected.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | June 23, 2006
Rockville -- Revealing that he received a diagnosis of clinical depression this week, Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan bowed out of the race for governor yesterday, a startling move that reshapes this year's contentious gubernatorial campaign. Duncan's decision eliminates the need for a long and costly Democratic primary that some had feared would leave the eventual nominee depleted of cash and politically bruised. In an attempt to unite his party, Duncan endorsed Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley in the fall contest against incumbent Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a Republican.
NEWS
By Doug Birch and Doug Birch,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers Thomas W. Waldron, William F. Zorzi Jr., John W. Frece, Robert Timberg and Tom Horton contributed to this article | November 8, 1994
In what one candidate calls "a struggle for the soul of Maryland," voters today will decide a too-close-to-call governor's race that could spin the state into a political U- turn.And it doesn't stop there. A reputedly restive electorate must also choose between continuity and change in numerous other contests, including those for state attorney general, comptroller, eight congressional seats and U.S. senator.Political professionals say that a modest turnout will favor the Republican candidate in the governor's race, Ellen R. Sauerbrey.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Michael Dresser and Craig Timberg contributed to this article | July 7, 1998
Resisting the allure of a more winnable contest, Harford County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann resolved again yesterday to oust her party's incumbent governor, Parris N. Glendening -- a decision that promises a spirited Democratic gubernatorial primary.The death of Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein on Friday presented unexpected opportunity which, Rehrmann said, a number of Democrats urged her to take.But she said voters across the state are hungry for the reliability she promises."We have a governor who's more interested in his future than Maryland's future," she said.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 10, 1993
The Democratic race for governor and the American League East have in common that everyone is more or less in first place.Now all Bill needs to do is think up a health bill that will fix everything that's broke and nothing that isn't, and then get it passed.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Ending months of speculation, conservative activist and real estate executive Larry Hogan is getting into the race for governor, running as a political outsider to "bring fiscal responsibility and common sense to Annapolis. " The former appointments secretary for the state's last Republican governor, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., is to formally announce Tuesday evening in Annapolis that he's seeking the GOP nomination. He joins three other Republican contenders who despite launching campaigns months ago have yet to raise much money or garner a lot of attention in a bid to end Democratic dominance of state government.
NEWS
May 30, 2013
The 2014 Maryland governor's race has been shaping up so far as a fight about inevitability. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler long fostered the sense of his own lock on the job through a massive campaign war chest. Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown countered by becoming the first to officially enter the race, more than a year before the Democratic primary. Meanwhile, an assortment of potential Republican candidates and two other Democrats - Howard County Executive Ken Ulman and Del. Heather Mizeur - have been trying to make the case that an underdog could win. Now Mr. Brown is seeking to tilt the inevitability scales permanently in his favor with his planned announcement Monday that Mr. Ulman will join him as his running mate.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
The 2014 governor's race came into clearer focus Wednesday as Harford County Executive David R. Craig set a date to announce his Republican candidacy and Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown's campaign confirmed that Howard County Executive Ken Ulman will be his running mate in his bid for the Democratic nomination. Craig, 63, will become the first major GOP contender to enter the race when he holds a campaign event Monday. Brown, who got a jump on other Democrats when he announced his candidacy this month, plans to announce Ulman's agreement to join his ticket the same day. With the twin announcements, the race to succeed term-limited Gov. Martin O'Malley will shift into a higher gear.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2012
OCEAN CITY - Potential candidates for governor in 2014 flocked here this week to raise cash, mingle with other elected officials and line up support for their likely campaigns. On the Democratic side, at least five potential contenders for the governor's office were making the rounds at the annual political rite staged by the Maryland Association of Counties. Three potential Republican hopefuls also were chatting up potential supporters. For aspirants to statewide office, the summer conference is virtually a must-go occasion.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
Baltimore County Council member Joseph Bartenfelder's campaign for county executive got a lift Thursday night as members of the Metropolitan Baltimore Council AFL-CIO, representing thousands of workers in more than 184 locals, voted to support and make working for him a "priority" in his race for the Democratic nomination against chief opponent and fellow council member Kevin Kamenetz. Baltimore City State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy also got the nod as she tries to hold off a Democratic primary challenge from former federal prosecutor Gregg Bernstein.
NEWS
February 23, 2008
EVAN MECHAM, 83 Former Arizona governor Evan Mecham, a firebrand conservative who served 15 months as Arizona's governor before a dramatic impeachment trial removed him from office in 1988, died Thursday, a former aide said. He was 83. Mr. Mecham, had been in deteriorating health with Alzheimer's disease for years, said state Sen. Karen Johnson. Mr. Mecham won a three-way race for governor in November 1986. In April 1988, the Republican was removed from office when the state Senate convicted him of obstructing justice and misusing $80,000 in state funds.
NEWS
September 25, 2006
A map that accompanied an article in yesterday's editions about a poll in the race for governor should have been titled "Candidates by region," not "Candidates by county." The map intended to show that Mayor Martin O'Malley and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. were statistically tied in the Greater Baltimore region, which includes Baltimore City and Baltimore, Anne Arundel, Howard, Harford and Carroll counties. It did not mean to imply that the candidates were tied in each jurisdiction in the region.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 1, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. named Baltimore lawyer A. Dwight Pettit to the University System of Maryland's Board of Regents yesterday, filling the vacancy created by the resignation of former chairman Nathan A. Chapman Jr. Pettit, 57, has worked as district counsel to the Small Business Administration in Washington and as counsel to the Baltimore County branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Now in private practice, he was a prominent member of a group of Democrats supporting Ehrlich, a Republican, in his race for governor and appeared in a pro-Ehrlich television commercial aimed at black voters.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,SUN REPORTER | November 6, 2006
With Maryland's close gubernatorial and U.S. Senate races likely to hinge on voter turnout, political parties and interest groups are orchestrating what might be the state's most extensive get-out-the-vote efforts in a midterm election. From church-organized precinct walks in West Baltimore to elaborate suburban phone bank operations, thousands of volunteers and hundreds of thousands of dollars have been poured into Maryland's vote-flushing armies, each fighting for the same elusive - and potentially decisive - prize: the voter who needs a push to make it to the polls tomorrow.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter Rail or bus. Bridge or ferries. Tolls or taxes. These and other issues affecting how Marylanders get around could be at stake in this year's contest between Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Mayor Martin O'Malley | November 3, 2006
In a governor's race dominated by the issues of education, crime and the economy, transportation so far has taken a back seat. But in a state that slogs through some of the worst traffic congestion in the country, moving people and goods remains one of the most important functions of state government. "A lot of key decisions are scheduled to be made in the next four years, and the outcome of those decisions could influence jobs and neighborhood investments and growth patterns for generations to come," said Dan Pontious, policy director for Baltimore's Citizens Planning and Housing Association.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.