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SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
Brad Banker grew up a sports fan outside Green Bay, Wis., but auto racing was not high on his list of passions. His father was a longtime employee of the Packers and Banker, who somehow became a fan of the rival Minnesota Vikings, wound up playing football and lacrosse at Moorhead State in Minnesota. Banker taught for a year after getting his master's, but went into commercial real estate to make a little more money. But it wasn't until Banker got his commercial trucking license and found a job working for Andretti Racing that he finally found his dream job. Starting off driving the team's haulers from stop to stop, Banker eventually got a part-time gig changing tires on pit road and wound up overseeing the team's logistical issues for everything from corporate tents to Port-o-Johns.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Nearly a year after the last race car whizzed down Baltimore's streets, the Grand Prix Indycar race is still costing the city money.  On Wednesday, city officials are set to authorize a $485,000 payment to P. Flanigan & Sons Inc. for road work done in 2011 and 2012 for the Baltimore Grand Prix.  The company's road work ended up being more expensive than anticipated, but city transporation officials didn't immediately bring the increased costs...
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SPORTS
August 28, 2012
I know nothing about open-wheel, IndyCar racing, but I do recognize what happens to squabbling families - and how they self-destruct. Until the Baltimore Grand Prix came to our city for a second time, I never bothered to study the sport, and I'm trying to learn. It's amazing there are so many "moving parts" to putting on a road race, and the skill and technology involved boggle the mind. If the people of Baltimore were smart (a questionable assumption), they would support the Baltimore Grand Prix in the same way they coddle the Ravens.
NEWS
By Sue Van Essen, svanessen@hotmail.com | April 4, 2014
By the time the kids are in fifth grade, many school volunteers find it time to go back to work and are no longer able to volunteer. Not so for Ron and Wendy Duncan . But then again, they're not parents of elementary students, they're grandparents! They started volunteering when their grandson started kindergarten at Oakleigh Elementary; six years later, they are still there. As the boy moved up a grade, they moved up but they also continued to volunteer in the grades he completed.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1997
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- Dale Earnhardt was in the ambulance and about to be driven to the Daytona International Speedway's infield care center yesterday, when he looked back at his crumpled race car."I saw the wheels were still on it," he said after the crushing accident that had seen his car roll over and off the speedway and land in a heap on the backstretch grass with 10 laps to go in the Daytona 500."I jumped out and told the guy in the car to fire it up," he said. "And when it started, I said, 'Get out!
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
Everyone knows there are major differences between 17-year-old race car drivers and 30-something race car drivers. But it couldn't be better illustrated than the activity of Star Mazda driver Zach Veach Wednesday and IndyCar drivers Will Power and Ryan Hunter-Reay, who are in the midst of a championship fight during this Grand Prix of Baltimore weekend. Wednesday afternoon, Power, 31, spent his time doing media interviews at a luncheon in downtown Baltimore, while Hunter-Reay, who will be 32 in December, also took the opportunity to take a nap before getting ready for a sponsor activity Wednesday evening.
SPORTS
By Stan Dillon and Stan Dillon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 1995
The ultimate dream of many race fans is to drive a race car on one of the local ovals. Until recently, the only way to realize such a dream was to spend a lot of your own money and invest in your own team.Finksburg's Greg O'Neill is trying to change that in the form of a racing school, called Speed Quest Motorsports. Although there is much to be learned, the primary intent of the school is to provide the experience of driving a sprint or late-model race car to local racers and fans.For as little as $200, the racing fan can get into a $50,000 race car and run up to speeds of 100 miles per hour.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | May 25, 1994
INDIANAPOLIS -- Jacques Villeneuve doesn't play golf, which instantly sets him apart from nearly every other driver in the Indianapolis 500."I'm too competitive," said the rookie. "To go golfing would not be relaxing. Everything I do, I want to win. It would be just too frustrating."Villeneuve demonstrated this resolve the first day drivers were allowed to qualify for the 78th Indianapolis 500. He put his Player's International Reynard/Ford on the inside of Row 2 by compiling a four-lap average of 226.259 mph. It was a performance that made him the fastest of nine rookies in Sunday's race.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | July 23, 1993
Most people would consider themselves lucky just to survive a life-threatening crash. NASCAR driver Neil Bonnett was in such a crash at Darlington in 1990, one that affected his memory and equilibrium, but he is having no second thoughts about getting back behind the wheel."
SPORTS
By STAN DILLON | October 18, 1992
Not every race fan or driver is able to attend the races every week. Some can attend only when time and finances permit. But they still love drag racing as much as the weekly competitor.Stanley Nusbaum is an avid race fan. He loves drag racing and attends as often as time allows. And he competes when he can.Some day, when he has the time and finances, he plans on pursuing drag racing on a weekly basis. Now, he gets his kicks racing at least once a year at 75-80 Dragway on Fall Ford Spectacular Day.Nusbaum fell in love with drag racing while in high school.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
Brad Banker grew up a sports fan outside Green Bay, Wis., but auto racing was not high on his list of passions. His father was a longtime employee of the Packers and Banker, who somehow became a fan of the rival Minnesota Vikings, wound up playing football and lacrosse at Moorhead State in Minnesota. Banker taught for a year after getting his master's, but went into commercial real estate to make a little more money. But it wasn't until Banker got his commercial trucking license and found a job working for Andretti Racing that he finally found his dream job. Starting off driving the team's haulers from stop to stop, Banker eventually got a part-time gig changing tires on pit road and wound up overseeing the team's logistical issues for everything from corporate tents to Port-o-Johns.
SPORTS
By Ed Carpenter | August 31, 2013
For my latest blog for The Baltimore Sun, I thought it might be fun to interview my favorite celebrity, golfer Fuzzy Zoeller. As you know if you've seen my car, Fuzzy's Ultra Premium Vodka is my primary sponsor, but Fuzzy is more than just the name behind the incredible spirit that powers our team. He's also a family friend, an Indiana boy and one of the greatest golfers who ever lived. So, without further ado, here's my Q&A with my sponsor: Me: Why did you choose my team?
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
The race car - what's left of it - sits in a yard in Middle River, a rusty hulk entombed by weeds. The engine's gone; the tires rotted. "It ain't very pretty to look at," Pete Kantorsky, Jr. said of the 1937 Ford. But one man's junk is another's treasure. Sitting by his old jalopy, which he drove at Dorsey Speedway in the 1960s, Kantorsky pats the side of the run-down stock car as a jockey might greet an aging racehorse. "I see this car and I think about the good times and the bad," he said.
NEWS
February 14, 2013
One of the most popular topics for legislators today is restricting gun ownership in some form or fashion ("Guns: Old issue, new hurdles," Feb. 10). They have labeled some firearms as "assault" weapons and likened them to those used by the military. I spent 23 years in the U. S. Marine Corps, and I have never heard the term assault weapon used there. The fact is, the word "assault" is not an adjective. Second, only people who don't understand firearms believe that a gun purchased from a local firearms dealer has the same capability as those used by our military or police.
NEWS
September 6, 2012
As the dust settles and rain washes away the last vestiges of this year's Baltimore Grand Prix, I hope everyone reflects on the past few days in a way that allows them to see the potential and excitement of this event, rather than spend time complaining about what went wrong ("After Grand Prix, crews hustle to clear streets," Sept. 4). I moved to Baltimore from Paris, France, in 1998, and I'm originally from Montreal, Canada, a city that hosts its own Grand Prix (albeit of the Formula 1 kind)
SPORTS
By Don Markus, Sandra McKee and Jonas Shaffer and Baltimore Sun Media Group | September 2, 2012
Ed Carpenter, the only driver who had finished the previous 13 events on this year's IndyCar Series circuit, did not make it to the end Sunday in the Grand Prix of Baltimore. The same chicane where Carpenter's car went airborne Saturday turned out to be even more problematic on Sunday. Instead of coming down unscathed, Carpenter's car skidded into the wall on Lap 9 of the 75-lap race. “I was trying to gain time through the chicane and I just pushed too hard and hit the wall,” said Carpenter, 31, the only owner-driver on the circuit.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1996
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- It was the last lap. Ernie Irvan and Kenny Schrader came out of the fourth turn dead-even. Then Schrader nosed ahead as the two barreled toward the finish line.But with yards to go, Irvan pulled an old auto-racing trick. His Ford bumped Schrader's Chevrolet hard to regain the advantage and he burst across the finish line -- nine-hundredths of a second ahead of his rival.Irvan, the man who almost died in a racing accident two years ago, is back, driving like he has never been away.
SPORTS
By David Thomas, Fort Worth Star-Telegram | April 9, 2011
FORT WORTH, Texas — The question people were asking Brian Vickers was, "Will you be able to race again?" The question Vickers was asking himself was, "Do I want to race again?" That might seem like a silly question, Vickers said this week, for a then-26-year-old who began racing karts at age 8 and missed his high school prom to compete at one of NASCAR's most distinctive tracks — Bristol Motor Speedway — in the Busch Grand National Series, and placed 14th. "But when you've gone through all that," Vickers said, "you start looking at your life from a different perspective.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
James Hinchcliffe has slipped comfortably into Danica Patrick's former race car, if not specifically into her driving shoes. IndyCar's 2011 rookie of the year has taken the Michael Andretti Autosports car driven by Patrick to a 10th-place finish in the points last year, and become a regular top five finisher and legitimate contender for the series title. In the process, he has displayed a sense of humor, going so far as to don a woman's black wig at introductions for the opening race of the season.
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