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NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1999
They look like small brown bricks. They smell like fish. And they just might be the answer to reducing Anne Arundel County's rabid raccoon population.For the second consecutive year, the county's Department of Health will dispense Raboral V-RG, an oral rabies vaccine, throughout the Annapolis peninsula, which stretches from Crownsville, through Annapolis, to the Bay Bridge. Health department officials and volunteers plan to distribute 9,000 doses of the vaccine, which are embedded in fish meal, on Monday.
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NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1999
They look like small brown bricks. They smell like fish. And they just might be the answer to reducing Anne Arundel County's rabid raccoon population.For the second consecutive year, the county's Department of Health will dispense Raboral V-RG, an oral rabies vaccine, throughout the Annapolis peninsula, which stretches from Crownsville, through Annapolis, to the Bay Bridge. Health department officials and volunteers plan to distribute 9,000 doses of the vaccine, which are embedded in fish meal, on Monday.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1999
Anne Arundel County's Health Department is searching for any residents in the Virginia Avenue area of Edgewater Beach who might have come into contact with two stray dogs that killed a raccoon Wednesday morning.The raccoon tested positive for rabies, and county officials are concerned that the disease may have been passed to anyone who touched either dog -- particularly anyone who may have touched the dogs between 7 a.m. and noon Wednesday.One of the dogs was described as a white mutt, possibly part husky and part shepherd, weighing about 65 pounds.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1998
Good news for humankind: We're not entirely to blame for Chesapeake Bay pollution. So says Virginia Tech biologist George M. Simmons, a former Antarctic explorer who now roams the tidal creeks of his state's Eastern Shore armed with a pooper scooper.Simmons' surprising conclusion: Humans aren't always the source of the fecal coliform bacteria that contaminates some bay waters, forcing Maryland and Virginia officials to close thousands of acres of clam and oyster beds each year. Neither are geese and ducks, which often get blamed for fouling creeks and ponds.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
Anne Arundel County Health Department officials are counting on a fishy-smelling bait laced with rabies vaccine to help slow the spread of the disease among raccoons.The vaccine disguised in a reeking raccoon delicacy will be scattered through wooded and bushy areas on the Annapolis peninsula in October in a test that, if successful in reducing rabies cases -- and the resultant threat to people -- could be expanded to other parts of the county.Most casesLast year, Anne Arundel County had the most animal rabies cases of any county in Maryland, with 97 animals, mostly raccoons, found to be infected.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
Anne Arundel County Health Department officials are counting on a fishy-smelling bait laced with rabies vaccine to help slow the spread of the disease among raccoons.The vaccine, disguised in a reeking raccoon delicacy, will be scattered through wooded and bushy areas on the Annapolis peninsula in October in a test that, if successful in reducing rabies cases -- and the resultant threat to people -- could be expanded to other areas.Last year, Anne Arundel County had the most animal rabies cases of any county in Maryland, with 97 animals, mostly raccoons, found to be infected.
NEWS
By Alec Klein and Alec Klein,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1998
In a rare outbreak of rabies in the city, health officials confirmed yesterday at least two recent cases involving infected raccoons, and residents reported a third rabid raccoon in Northeast Baltimore.Dr. Peter Beilenson, city health commissioner, said last night that one of the cases involved a man who raised a raccoon. No other details were immediately available. Reached at home, Jerome Ferguson, chief of the city's division for environmental health, would not comment.Records from the Municipal Animal Shelter show that a rabid raccoon was found March 12 in a residential back yard in tTC Lauraville, behind Morgan State University in Northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 27, 1996
DON'T name them the Crows, Buzzards, Rockfish, Old Bays, Middies, Raccoons, Ponies, Bawlamorons, Bangles, A-rabbers, Sea Nettles, Sons of the Colts, Readers or even the Marble Steps.The world is a safer place. Taiwan recognizes China.The city that reads has no need for libraries.And the Oscar for long-distance running to Bob Dole!Pub Date: 3/27/96
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1995
It's a situation that pits a wild-animal lover against the state agency designed to protect such animals, the Department of Natural Resources (DNR).Howard County animal activist Colleen Layton says she has saved more than 100 hurt or sick animals over the past 18 years. But the DNR says her efforts are illegal, and it has moved to stop her from taking in more wild animals.DNR officials seized four skunks and two raccoons from Ms. Layton's 5-acre farm on Route 99 in Woodstock in the past month, saying she violated state law by breeding the raccoons and caring for the skunks.
SPORTS
By Jason LaCanfora | June 28, 1995
If you've seen the movie "Pocahontas," then you got a sneak peek at the newest sports mascot in town.The uniforms of the Baltimore Bandits of the American Hockey League will feature a raccoon-like character with skates and a hockey stick who is based loosely on Meeko, a character in the movie."
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