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Rabies

NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | January 18, 2010
Health officials have confirmed a case of rabies in a 6-week-old Jersey calf at an educational center in Prince George's County where elementary and middle school students learned about farming and natural resources in the Potomac River watershed. Officials with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene have made it a priority to assess about 70 children who recently visited the Hard Bargain Farm in Accokeek. In particular, they are investigating whether any children participated in bottle feeding the calf whose mother died in an accident, said Katherine Feldman, a state public health veterinarian.
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NEWS
August 30, 2009
Lead certificate requirement The Anne Arundel County Department of Health reminds parents that all children newly enrolled in county pre-kindergarten, kindergarten and first grade are required to have a lead testing certificate. The certificate ensures that children living in high-risk areas are being tested for lead poisoning, which can cause young children to have difficulty learning, behavioral problems and developmental disabilities. High-risk ZIP codes in Anne Arundel are 20711, 20714, 20764, 20779, 21060, 21061, 21225, 21226, and 21402, because they have a greater proportion of older homes that may contain lead paint.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | August 29, 2009
The number of bats that have tested positive for rabies in Baltimore has increased this summer, according to city officials, who are also seeing a rise in complaints about bats from homeowners. "This time last year, we had three positives," said Bob Anderson, director of the city's Bureau of Animal Control. "So far this year, we have five and we have another 12 waiting for testing. That could make six. "I don't want to alarm people, but six is a big leap." There have been more than 100 calls to animal control so far this summer, and 60 bats have been captured and tested for rabies, he said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | August 14, 2009
An isolated Harford County farm will remain under quarantine through the end of this month after a horse stabled there tested positive for the rabies virus and was euthanized, officials said. The county health department will observe all animals at the Churchville farm before lifting the 45-day quarantine on Aug. 31. The horse, which arrived at the farm in May, manifested striking changes in behavior in mid-July. On the recommendation of the health department, the animal was taken to the University of Pennsylvania veterinary facility in New Bolton, which diagnosed the rabies infection.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | August 23, 2008
A stray kitten that wandered into a North Baltimore backyard this month had rabies, the first city cat or dog found to have the disease in more than 20 years, officials said yesterday. Two people who tried to help the kitten are receiving medical treatment. Others who are concerned that they or their pets may have had contact with the kitten are asked to call the Bureau of Animal Control. The cream-colored male tabby kitten was found in a yard in the 7100 block of Marlborough Drive, near the city-county line, Aug. 5. The kitten, which appeared to be about 4 months old, was wounded on his back and a hind leg, said Bob Anderson, the director of the Animal Control Bureau.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | January 9, 2008
A 9-year-old girl remained hospitalized yesterday after being attacked by a "pit-bull type" dog that was running loose in an East Baltimore neighborhood, animal control officials said. The animal bit the girl on her hands, arms and shoulders, said Bureau of Animal Control Director Bob Anderson, who did not release the child's name. She was rushed to Johns Hopkins Hospital after the incident on Monday evening, but her condition could not be ascertained. An unconfirmed report said the girl's grandmother tried to ward off the dog with a stick, but the agency's investigator was still looking into the incident late yesterday and could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun reporter | October 7, 2007
Harford County health officials confirmed yesterday that an abandoned kitten has tested positive for rabies. They are seeking anyone who might have had contact with other kittens, or the mother cat, that were left outside a Pylesville convenience store about a month ago. "We don't perceive many people are at risk, but anyone who has been exposed is at great risk," said Bill Wiseman, county Health Department spokesman. "They are at risk for a potentially life-threatening disease." Wiseman said the tested kitten was among a litter that was left in a box with its mother outside a High's convenience store at Routes 24 and 165. He said two kittens were taken by people at the store, and the other kittens and the mother are missing.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | August 18, 2007
A rabid beaver may have attacked two people at Loch Raven Reservoir last weekend, but area public health officials say there has been no increase in rabies infection rates among humans or animals. "We're not seeing anything noticeable," said Gary Thompson, rabies coordinator for the Baltimore County Health Department. Cases of human infection are extremely rare, with only a few reported each year nationwide, according to federal health experts. The last human death in Maryland was in 1976 when a bat bit someone, state health officials say. Physicians and hospitals are required to report animal bites to county and state health departments.
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