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Rabies Vaccine

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NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
Anne Arundel County Health Department officials are counting on a fishy-smelling bait laced with rabies vaccine to help slow the spread of the disease among raccoons.The vaccine, disguised in a reeking raccoon delicacy, will be scattered through wooded and bushy areas on the Annapolis peninsula in October in a test that, if successful in reducing rabies cases -- and the resultant threat to people -- could be expanded to other areas.Last year, Anne Arundel County had the most animal rabies cases of any county in Maryland, with 97 animals, mostly raccoons, found to be infected.
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NEWS
April 21, 2014
Harford County Health Department will sponsor a series of rabies vaccination clinics later this month and early next month for dogs, cats and ferrets that are three months and older. Recognizing the very important public health value of low cost rabies vaccination of companion pets to prevent the spread of rabies, the health department has kept the fee for the vaccination at the very low cost of $5 per animal. "We are delighted to once again offer these $5 pet rabies vaccinations to the public.
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NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1999
They look like small brown bricks. They smell like fish. And they just might be the answer to reducing Anne Arundel County's rabid raccoon population.For the second consecutive year, the county's Department of Health will dispense Raboral V-RG, an oral rabies vaccine, throughout the Annapolis peninsula, which stretches from Crownsville, through Annapolis, to the Bay Bridge. Health department officials and volunteers plan to distribute 9,000 doses of the vaccine, which are embedded in fish meal, on Monday.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
A man in north Ocean City was attacked on Tuesday by a raccoon that later tested positive for rabies. According to the Worcester County Health Department, a citizen reported the attack by "an aggressive raccoon" near Northside Park at 125th Street and the Bay. Health officials said they believe two other people were also charged by the same raccoon. The raccoon was captured and terminated after testing positive for rabies, officials said. The man is being treated for his injuries and exposure to the disease.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
Anne Arundel County Health Department officials are counting on a fishy-smelling bait laced with rabies vaccine to help slow the spread of the disease among raccoons.The vaccine disguised in a reeking raccoon delicacy will be scattered through wooded and bushy areas on the Annapolis peninsula in October in a test that, if successful in reducing rabies cases -- and the resultant threat to people -- could be expanded to other parts of the county.Most casesLast year, Anne Arundel County had the most animal rabies cases of any county in Maryland, with 97 animals, mostly raccoons, found to be infected.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 10, 2001
The House Environmental Matters Committee has killed a bill that would have added skunks to the list of animals Marylanders can keep as pets. The state's departments of Health and Mental Hygiene and Natural Resources strongly opposed the bill, sponsored by Del. George W. Owings III of Calvert County. State health officials contended during a hearing on the bill that skunks were "terrestrial reservoirs of rabies." They were especially concerned that the federal government has not approved a rabies vaccine for the animals.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1994
Kodak may sell Sterling DrugEastman Kodak Co.'s stock price jumped 7.8 percent yesterday amid reports that the photography giant might sell or spin off its Sterling Drug unit.Kodak said it will make a "significant" announcement at 7:30 a.m. today.Analysts said Sterling could be a candidate for sale, especially after a sharp rise in drug stocks propelled by news yesterday that Roche Holding Ltd. bid $5.3 billion for Syntex Corp. Kodak acquired Sterling in 1988 for $5.1 billion.Kodak's share price rose $3.25, to $44.75, on heavy trading volume.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
A man in north Ocean City was attacked on Tuesday by a raccoon that later tested positive for rabies. According to the Worcester County Health Department, a citizen reported the attack by "an aggressive raccoon" near Northside Park at 125th Street and the Bay. Health officials said they believe two other people were also charged by the same raccoon. The raccoon was captured and terminated after testing positive for rabies, officials said. The man is being treated for his injuries and exposure to the disease.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2011
Animal bites can be serious. They can injure the skin and bones and joints, and the damage could have lasting impacts. Dr. Tanveer Giaibi, chief of emergency medicine at Northwest Hospitals, answers questions about the dangers of and treatments for all kinds of bites. Question: How common are animal bites and scratches, and who is most likely to get them? Answer: Animal bites are common, with 2 [million] to 5 million occurring each year. Children are bitten more often than adults.
NEWS
By Kara Eide and Kara Eide,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2003
Anne Arundel County health officials are looking for anyone who might have handled a critically injured cat in Glen Burnie this month, saying it was found to have rabies. The orange and brown striped female cat, found June 3 near Gold's Gym at 6324 Ritchie Highway, tested positive for rabies Friday. The Health Department announced that anyone who came in contact with a cat of this description should receive rabies preventive treatment immediately, in the form of a series of vaccinations.
NEWS
write2shell@yahoo.com | May 20, 2013
Our local Pet Valu store, at 5007 Honeygo Center Dr in Perry Hall, is bringing a VIP Pet Care Veterinary Clinic to our neighborhood. This nonemergency vet care clinic features vaccinations and micro-chipping among its services for dogs and cats. In addition, on the Saturdays of May 25, June 8 and June 22, from 9:30 a.m. to 11a.m., rabies vaccines for dogs will be administered free of charge. I Store manager Andrew Thompson has been employed by Pet Valu for the past two years.
HEALTH
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
For the first year in more than a decade, no rabies vaccine baits will be placed in Anne Arundel, after the county was cut from the federal program, according to county health officials. The project used a county police helicopter and volunteers to immunize thousands of raccoons and other small wild animals in an effort to prevent the spread of the deadly virus, dropping baits to be eaten by the animals in late summer and fall. The number of reported rabies cases has plummeted since the county began using the edible vaccine baits, starting with a small area in 1998.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 23, 2012
The Harford County Health Department has announced the schedule for its annual sponsorship of rabies vaccination clinics for dogs, cats and ferrets that are 3 months old or older. Dates for this year's clinics are Sunday, April 29, and Sunday, May 6, 2-4 p.m., at the following locations: April 29: Abingdon Fire Company, 3308 Abingdon Road in Abingdon; Harford County Equestrian Center, parking located at 702 N. Tollgate Road, in Bel Air; Susquehanna Hose Company House 4, Revolution Street and Bloomsbury Avenue in Havre de Grace; and Whiteford Volunteer Fire Company, 1407 Pylesville Road (Route 165)
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2011
Animal bites can be serious. They can injure the skin and bones and joints, and the damage could have lasting impacts. Dr. Tanveer Giaibi, chief of emergency medicine at Northwest Hospitals, answers questions about the dangers of and treatments for all kinds of bites. Question: How common are animal bites and scratches, and who is most likely to get them? Answer: Animal bites are common, with 2 [million] to 5 million occurring each year. Children are bitten more often than adults.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | August 18, 2007
A rabid beaver may have attacked two people at Loch Raven Reservoir last weekend, but area public health officials say there has been no increase in rabies infection rates among humans or animals. "We're not seeing anything noticeable," said Gary Thompson, rabies coordinator for the Baltimore County Health Department. Cases of human infection are extremely rare, with only a few reported each year nationwide, according to federal health experts. The last human death in Maryland was in 1976 when a bat bit someone, state health officials say. Physicians and hospitals are required to report animal bites to county and state health departments.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
If you come across a brown cube on the ground -- it'll be about the size of an engagement ring box -- leave it be. It is probably a vaccine for the county's raccoons. The Anne Arundel County Health Department distributed more than 81,000 vaccination-laced pellets throughout the Broadneck Peninsula this week. Each cube smells of fish and has the Health Department's phone number stamped on the side. "Rabies is a public health threat," said Elin Jones, a Health Department spokeswoman. "It is a fatal viral infection.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
The Harford County Health Department will conduct rabies vaccinationclinics for dogs and cats from 2 to 4 p.m. today, at the following locations:Joppa-Magnolia Volunteer Fire Department, Route 7 and Mountain Road; Darlington Volunteer Fire Department, Darlington; CountyParks and Recreation Building, Old Aberdeen Elementary School, Howard and Franklin streets; Jarrettsville Volunteer Fire Department, intersection of Route 136 and Old Route 23.The vaccine administered...
NEWS
April 18, 2004
Health Department offers rabies vaccination clinics The Harford County Health Department will sponsor rabies vaccination clinics for dogs, cats and ferrets this spring. The fee will be $5 per animal. Clinics will be held from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. April 25 at Harford County Health Department, 119 S. Hays St., Bel Air; Susquehanna Hose Company, Revolution Street and Bloomsbury Avenue, Havre de Grace; Whiteford Volunteer Fire Company, Route 165, Whiteford; and Abingdon Volunteer Fire Company, 3308 Abingdon Road, Abingdon.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 2, 2005
MILWAUKEE - An athletic and mentally tough Jeanna Giese, who defeated the deadly rabies virus, started her new year yesterday by leaving Children's Hospital of Wisconsin a month early and going home to a waiting holiday celebration. The 15-year-old Fond du Lac girl is said to be the first person in medical history to have survived the disease without having received a vaccination after becoming infected through a bat bite. Equally impressive is Jeanna's recovery. Her body is undergoing a "rebirth," physicians said.
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