Advertisement
HomeCollectionsR Adams Cowley
IN THE NEWS

R Adams Cowley

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 29, 1991
Like any other multi-billion-dollar enterprise, hospital care can develop hide-bound routines, protected by high priests of orthodoxy. Rare is the individual brave enough to challenge that orthodoxy with solid analysis of its weaknesses and a plan of action for improvement. Rarer still is that individual with the staying power and tenacity to bring the improvements finally into being.Dr. R Adams Cowley, who died Sunday at 74, was such a man. Beginning his surgical practice in Europe after World War II, he found himself on a treadmill, racing to save lives cast into grave jeopardy by the left-over instruments of war. He concluded, rightly, that the procedures intended to save lives were themselves hindering the process.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
Nearly four decades ago, Baltimore's fledgling shock trauma center saved the life of a 29-year-old prosecutor. The young lawyer returned months later to ask the medical staff how he could repay their effort. "Run for office," center founder Dr. R Adams Cowley told C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger. "We need all the help we can get. " The exchange would alter the course of both of their careers. Ruppersberger would win election to the Baltimore County Council, rise to county executive and eventually become a member of Congress.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 29, 1991
Funeral services for Dr. R Adams Cowley, emergency medicine pioneer will be held at 11 a.m. Nov. 4 at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1400 Dulaney Valley Road.Graveside services at 2:30 p.m. at Arlington National Cemetery will follow.Dr. Cowley, 74, who created the concept of shock-trauma medicine and founded what became the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems, died Sunday of coronary disease at his home in Baltimore.Dr. Cowley was a military surgeon in hospitals in post-war France and Germany, where he began his study of emergency medical techniques.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2012
Elizabeth S. Trump, former longtime director of nurses at Maryland Shock Trauma Center who played a pivotal role in its establishment with Dr. R Adams Cowley more than 50 years ago, died Wednesday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis at her home in the Hampton neighborhood of Baltimore County. She was 78. "Liz and R A. started and matured what is considered by everyone the most sophisticated trauma center in the United States, if not the world," said Dr. Thomas M. Scalea, Shock Trauma's physician-in-chief.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | October 28, 1991
Dr. R Adams Cowley, the brilliant, combative surgeon who pioneered the shock-trauma medicine that has saved thousands severely injured emergency patients here and across the nation, died yesterday at his home in Baltimore. He was 74.A spokesman at the Shock-Trauma Unit in Baltimore said coronary disease was the apparent cause of Dr. Cowley's death. Funeral arrangements were incomplete.Dr. Cowley, already a superior cardiac surgeon involved in early open-heart operations, was one of the first to recognize that emergency medicine should be a separate medical discipline, demanding doctors, nurses and paramedics trained in the needs of people with multiple, massive injuries.
NEWS
By Suzanne Wooton | November 5, 1991
The firetrucks flanked Dulaney Valley Road, their aerial ladders forming a towering archway. Below, the funeral cortege streamed by en route to Arlington National Cemetery where Shock Trauma founder R Adams Cowley was buried yesterday.It was a hero's farewell by paramedic and rescue workers for a doctor whose high-drama brand of medicine put accident victims' lives and dreams back together during a tiny window of opportunity he called "the golden hour."The procession followed an hourlong funeral service where physicians, friends and politicians eulogized Dr. Cowley, the 74-year-old pioneer of shock trauma medicine, as a visionary who saw his dream materialize through sheer force of will, character and persuasion.
NEWS
By Albert Sehlstedt Jr. Lynda Robinson of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | October 28, 1991
Dr. R Adams Cowley, the visionary and sometimes abrasive surgeon at the University of Maryland who established a world renowned shock trauma center to treat severely injured people, died yesterday at his Baltimore home. He was 74.Dr. Cowley, who suffered from heart disease for years, died of apparent coronary failure at 2:17 p.m.Dr. Cowley was native of Utah who received his medical degree from the University of Maryland in 1944. He propounded the theory that there was a "golden hour" in the ebbing lives of accident victims when they could be saved if specially trained doctors and nurses could exercise their skills in a properly equipped surgical setting.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2012
Elizabeth S. Trump, former longtime director of nurses at Maryland Shock Trauma Center who played a pivotal role in its establishment with Dr. R Adams Cowley more than 50 years ago, died Wednesday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis at her home in the Hampton neighborhood of Baltimore County. She was 78. "Liz and R A. started and matured what is considered by everyone the most sophisticated trauma center in the United States, if not the world," said Dr. Thomas M. Scalea, Shock Trauma's physician-in-chief.
NEWS
October 29, 1991
Early in his career, Dr. R Adams Cowley vowed to build something at the University of Maryland that was better than anything any place else. He succeeded. The university's R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center has become the world's pacesetter in treating traumatic injuries. Because the center exists -- and because it has pioneered strategic advancements in trauma medicine -- thousands of people in Maryland and elsewhere are alive who would otherwise have never survived their injuries. Cowley, who died Sunday at 74, wanted to make a difference in this world -- and those lives are abundant testimony that he did.
NEWS
March 6, 1993
The Losers in the Shock Trauma FightDr. R Adams Cowley must be spinning in his grave. The editorial in regard to the mauling of Dr. Kimball Maull (Feb. 27) would suggest that the highly politicized Emergency Medical System in Maryland might need a serious review soon lest it be dismantled.I am a former chairman of the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma. During my tenure, EMS development with the "trauma center" as the crown jewel of the system was its major emphasis. To separate EMS from the trauma center is literal heresy.
NEWS
March 6, 1993
The Losers in the Shock Trauma FightDr. R Adams Cowley must be spinning in his grave. The editorial in regard to the mauling of Dr. Kimball Maull (Feb. 27) would suggest that the highly politicized Emergency Medical System in Maryland might need a serious review soon lest it be dismantled.I am a former chairman of the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma. During my tenure, EMS development with the "trauma center" as the crown jewel of the system was its major emphasis. To separate EMS from the trauma center is literal heresy.
NEWS
By Suzanne Wooton | November 5, 1991
The firetrucks flanked Dulaney Valley Road, their aerial ladders forming a towering archway. Below, the funeral cortege streamed by en route to Arlington National Cemetery where Shock Trauma founder R Adams Cowley was buried yesterday.It was a hero's farewell by paramedic and rescue workers for a doctor whose high-drama brand of medicine put accident victims' lives and dreams back together during a tiny window of opportunity he called "the golden hour."The procession followed an hourlong funeral service where physicians, friends and politicians eulogized Dr. Cowley, the 74-year-old pioneer of shock trauma medicine, as a visionary who saw his dream materialize through sheer force of will, character and persuasion.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | November 4, 1991
The late Dr. R Adams Cowley, founder of the Maryland Shock-Trauma Center in Baltimore, was "arrogant, determined, stubborn and difficult to get along with."So did former Governor Marvin Mandel describe the late Dr. Cowley today at a memorial service at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Lutherville.If some of the traits Mandel described seemed somewhat harsh for a eulogy, the former governor explained that Cowley needed and used each one because "the man was so determined to make [the Shock-Trauma Center]
NEWS
October 29, 1991
Early in his career, Dr. R Adams Cowley vowed to build something at the University of Maryland that was better than anything any place else. He succeeded. The university's R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center has become the world's pacesetter in treating traumatic injuries. Because the center exists -- and because it has pioneered strategic advancements in trauma medicine -- thousands of people in Maryland and elsewhere are alive who would otherwise have never survived their injuries. Cowley, who died Sunday at 74, wanted to make a difference in this world -- and those lives are abundant testimony that he did.
NEWS
October 29, 1991
Like any other multi-billion-dollar enterprise, hospital care can develop hide-bound routines, protected by high priests of orthodoxy. Rare is the individual brave enough to challenge that orthodoxy with solid analysis of its weaknesses and a plan of action for improvement. Rarer still is that individual with the staying power and tenacity to bring the improvements finally into being.Dr. R Adams Cowley, who died Sunday at 74, was such a man. Beginning his surgical practice in Europe after World War II, he found himself on a treadmill, racing to save lives cast into grave jeopardy by the left-over instruments of war. He concluded, rightly, that the procedures intended to save lives were themselves hindering the process.
NEWS
October 29, 1991
Funeral services for Dr. R Adams Cowley, emergency medicine pioneer will be held at 11 a.m. Nov. 4 at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1400 Dulaney Valley Road.Graveside services at 2:30 p.m. at Arlington National Cemetery will follow.Dr. Cowley, 74, who created the concept of shock-trauma medicine and founded what became the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems, died Sunday of coronary disease at his home in Baltimore.Dr. Cowley was a military surgeon in hospitals in post-war France and Germany, where he began his study of emergency medical techniques.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | November 4, 1991
The late Dr. R Adams Cowley, founder of the Maryland Shock-Trauma Center in Baltimore, was "arrogant, determined, stubborn and difficult to get along with."So did former Governor Marvin Mandel describe the late Dr. Cowley today at a memorial service at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Lutherville.If some of the traits Mandel described seemed somewhat harsh for a eulogy, the former governor explained that Cowley needed and used each one because "the man was so determined to make [the Shock-Trauma Center]
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
Nearly four decades ago, Baltimore's fledgling shock trauma center saved the life of a 29-year-old prosecutor. The young lawyer returned months later to ask the medical staff how he could repay their effort. "Run for office," center founder Dr. R Adams Cowley told C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger. "We need all the help we can get. " The exchange would alter the course of both of their careers. Ruppersberger would win election to the Baltimore County Council, rise to county executive and eventually become a member of Congress.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | October 28, 1991
Dr. R Adams Cowley, the brilliant, combative surgeon who pioneered the shock-trauma medicine that has saved thousands severely injured emergency patients here and across the nation, died yesterday at his home in Baltimore. He was 74.A spokesman at the Shock-Trauma Unit in Baltimore said coronary disease was the apparent cause of Dr. Cowley's death. Funeral arrangements were incomplete.Dr. Cowley, already a superior cardiac surgeon involved in early open-heart operations, was one of the first to recognize that emergency medicine should be a separate medical discipline, demanding doctors, nurses and paramedics trained in the needs of people with multiple, massive injuries.
NEWS
By Albert Sehlstedt Jr. Lynda Robinson of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | October 28, 1991
Dr. R Adams Cowley, the visionary and sometimes abrasive surgeon at the University of Maryland who established a world renowned shock trauma center to treat severely injured people, died yesterday at his Baltimore home. He was 74.Dr. Cowley, who suffered from heart disease for years, died of apparent coronary failure at 2:17 p.m.Dr. Cowley was native of Utah who received his medical degree from the University of Maryland in 1944. He propounded the theory that there was a "golden hour" in the ebbing lives of accident victims when they could be saved if specially trained doctors and nurses could exercise their skills in a properly equipped surgical setting.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.