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Quotation Marks

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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Another annoying journalistic tic: the single-word quotation. I suppose that what, if anything, is in the reporter's mind is an impulse to indicate that the subject's exact words are being quoted. But this can lead to unintended consequences, especially when the single word within quotation marks is unremarkable.  Try this: McIntyre said that he was "honored" to be invited to speak to a group of Towson University students about editing.  The sentiment and the word are both commonplace, and eliminating the quotation marks would allow the reader to pass over this flat and unremarkable sentence quickly.  But the quotation marks catch the reader's eye, leading to a question: I wonder what he meant by that.  As Stan Carey points out in "The 'emphatic' use of quotation marks"   at Macmillan Dictionary , marking a single word with quotation marks can indicate a technical, foreign, or otherwise exotic term to the reader.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Another annoying journalistic tic: the single-word quotation. I suppose that what, if anything, is in the reporter's mind is an impulse to indicate that the subject's exact words are being quoted. But this can lead to unintended consequences, especially when the single word within quotation marks is unremarkable.  Try this: McIntyre said that he was "honored" to be invited to speak to a group of Towson University students about editing.  The sentiment and the word are both commonplace, and eliminating the quotation marks would allow the reader to pass over this flat and unremarkable sentence quickly.  But the quotation marks catch the reader's eye, leading to a question: I wonder what he meant by that.  As Stan Carey points out in "The 'emphatic' use of quotation marks"   at Macmillan Dictionary , marking a single word with quotation marks can indicate a technical, foreign, or otherwise exotic term to the reader.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By [SARAH KICKLER KELBER] | August 23, 2007
What's the point? -- If one of your grammatical pet peeves happens to be quotation marks used for emphasis - this is not what they are for! - this site will rile you up and make you laugh. It's called The "Blog" of "Unnecessary" Quotation Marks, and it documents goofy signs that make this particular gaffe. What to look for --The person who runs the site assumes that the words found in quotation marks are either insincere or sarcastic, and the interpretations of some of the signs are downright hilarious.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
The Inner city: Representative Paul Ryan of Wisconsin had to defend himself this week from accusations of racism.  The accusations were prompted by this statement in an interview: " We have got this tailspin of culture, in our inner cities in particular, of men not working and just generations of men not even thinking about working or learning the value and the culture of work. There is a real culture problem here that has to be dealt with. " The accusers assumed that his reference to inner cities was coded language for African-American . Mr. Ryan denied any racist intent, explaining that he had instead been "inarticulate.
NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | July 12, 1993
New Orleans. -- It seems to me that the older I get the more I see public events as occurring between quotation marks. Especially televised ones. I always knew that official pageantry was fake but I had no idea -- until Romania in 1989 and the Persian Gulf War -- that revolutions and wars can be too.I remember watching May Day parades in Romania when I was a child and thinking that everything I saw, the marching bands, the enbalmed officials on the rostrum,...
NEWS
January 18, 1994
QUAKE CHAT -- Faster than a 9600-baud modem, the global computer network buzzed into action after the ground stopped shaking yesterday in Southern California. And the system held up, even though the quake knocked out at least one main link.Within 20 minutes of the predawn earthquake, electronic messages flew on the Internet as computer users in the quake area described the destruction and people elsewhere asked about the fate of loved ones.In an electronic version of a ham radio network, some computer users in various parts of the country offered to relay messages to people in their areas from relatives and friends who couldn't make long-distance phone calls from the quake zone.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
The Inner city: Representative Paul Ryan of Wisconsin had to defend himself this week from accusations of racism.  The accusations were prompted by this statement in an interview: " We have got this tailspin of culture, in our inner cities in particular, of men not working and just generations of men not even thinking about working or learning the value and the culture of work. There is a real culture problem here that has to be dealt with. " The accusers assumed that his reference to inner cities was coded language for African-American . Mr. Ryan denied any racist intent, explaining that he had instead been "inarticulate.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | June 18, 2013
It's June. The "Wrestlemania hangover" is now far in the rear-view mirror. Some fans may have moved away from WWE for the time being. SummerSlam is in 2 months. It's in this sweet spot where something spectacular seems to happen on WWE Raw -- something that gets people talking. Last year, Vince McMahon returned to Raw for the first time in over a year. In 2011, CM Punk dropped a "pipe bomb" on television. In 2010, the Nexus formed. In 2009, Donald Trump bought Raw. In 2008, Vince McMahon vowed to give away $1 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lizzie Skurnick and Lizzie Skurnick,Special to the Sun | May 1, 2005
We're in Trouble By Christopher Coake. Harcourt. 306 pages. $23. In the sizable acknowledgments section of this debut short-story collection, it is safe to say that only the dentist has been cast out of the warm circle of the author's gratitude. Christopher Coake gives the ubiquitous nod not only to current and former partners, his family, his agent, and his editor, but also to the entire writing faculty of two MFA programs, all of his fellow workshop participants in each, various faculty at undergraduate institutions, a large span of old bosses and coworkers, and -- in an especially well-caffeinated gesture -- the staff at what are presumably favorite watering holes, one Caribou Coffee and a Caffe Apropos.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2000
Now that we know that the CBS eye is a voyeuristic one, cashing in on the public's willingness to watch, apparently, just about anything, the question is: Can we survive "Survivor"? And, if we're watching "Big Brother," is "Big Brother" watching us too, or maybe tuned into yet another of the so-called reality programs - "The Real World," "Road Rules" or "Making the Band." First, the good news. We're burning through our television fads faster and faster. Gone are the days when you could get the American public to spend an entire summer wondering who shot J.R. The Darva Conger jokes are winding down.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | June 18, 2013
It's June. The "Wrestlemania hangover" is now far in the rear-view mirror. Some fans may have moved away from WWE for the time being. SummerSlam is in 2 months. It's in this sweet spot where something spectacular seems to happen on WWE Raw -- something that gets people talking. Last year, Vince McMahon returned to Raw for the first time in over a year. In 2011, CM Punk dropped a "pipe bomb" on television. In 2010, the Nexus formed. In 2009, Donald Trump bought Raw. In 2008, Vince McMahon vowed to give away $1 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [SARAH KICKLER KELBER] | August 23, 2007
What's the point? -- If one of your grammatical pet peeves happens to be quotation marks used for emphasis - this is not what they are for! - this site will rile you up and make you laugh. It's called The "Blog" of "Unnecessary" Quotation Marks, and it documents goofy signs that make this particular gaffe. What to look for --The person who runs the site assumes that the words found in quotation marks are either insincere or sarcastic, and the interpretations of some of the signs are downright hilarious.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lizzie Skurnick and Lizzie Skurnick,Special to the Sun | May 1, 2005
We're in Trouble By Christopher Coake. Harcourt. 306 pages. $23. In the sizable acknowledgments section of this debut short-story collection, it is safe to say that only the dentist has been cast out of the warm circle of the author's gratitude. Christopher Coake gives the ubiquitous nod not only to current and former partners, his family, his agent, and his editor, but also to the entire writing faculty of two MFA programs, all of his fellow workshop participants in each, various faculty at undergraduate institutions, a large span of old bosses and coworkers, and -- in an especially well-caffeinated gesture -- the staff at what are presumably favorite watering holes, one Caribou Coffee and a Caffe Apropos.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2000
Now that we know that the CBS eye is a voyeuristic one, cashing in on the public's willingness to watch, apparently, just about anything, the question is: Can we survive "Survivor"? And, if we're watching "Big Brother," is "Big Brother" watching us too, or maybe tuned into yet another of the so-called reality programs - "The Real World," "Road Rules" or "Making the Band." First, the good news. We're burning through our television fads faster and faster. Gone are the days when you could get the American public to spend an entire summer wondering who shot J.R. The Darva Conger jokes are winding down.
NEWS
January 18, 1994
QUAKE CHAT -- Faster than a 9600-baud modem, the global computer network buzzed into action after the ground stopped shaking yesterday in Southern California. And the system held up, even though the quake knocked out at least one main link.Within 20 minutes of the predawn earthquake, electronic messages flew on the Internet as computer users in the quake area described the destruction and people elsewhere asked about the fate of loved ones.In an electronic version of a ham radio network, some computer users in various parts of the country offered to relay messages to people in their areas from relatives and friends who couldn't make long-distance phone calls from the quake zone.
NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | July 12, 1993
New Orleans. -- It seems to me that the older I get the more I see public events as occurring between quotation marks. Especially televised ones. I always knew that official pageantry was fake but I had no idea -- until Romania in 1989 and the Persian Gulf War -- that revolutions and wars can be too.I remember watching May Day parades in Romania when I was a child and thinking that everything I saw, the marching bands, the enbalmed officials on the rostrum,...
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | December 6, 1991
The Pay-Per-View Unlimited is rolling out of the station, starting to build up steam. But look up ahead, there's a car on the tracks and a man waving at the train to stop.That man is U.S. Representative William Lipinski, D-Ill., and he has some words for those engineers: "Casey, you better watch your speed."Lipinski, upset after the Notre Dame-Penn State football game nearly went to pay-per-view earlier this season, is introducing legislation that would prohibit pay-per-view telecasts from facilities built with public funds.
NEWS
June 5, 1993
By altering quotations and the circumstances in which they were said, author Janet Malcolm defamed psychoanalyst Jeffrey Masson in a New Yorker magazine article. That was the conclusion reached by a jury this week in a celebrated libel case. The jury's inability to agree on how much Mr. Masson should collect is a side issue to all but the protagonists and their lawyers.Some quotes attributed to Mr. Masson were not always the words he used, nor were they always uttered at the time or circumstances described in the article.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | December 6, 1991
The Pay-Per-View Unlimited is rolling out of the station, starting to build up steam. But look up ahead, there's a car on the tracks and a man waving at the train to stop.That man is U.S. Representative William Lipinski, D-Ill., and he has some words for those engineers: "Casey, you better watch your speed."Lipinski, upset after the Notre Dame-Penn State football game nearly went to pay-per-view earlier this season, is introducing legislation that would prohibit pay-per-view telecasts from facilities built with public funds.
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