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By KEN ROSENTHAL | November 19, 1994
WINNIPEG, Manitoba -- One Winnipeg columnist called it "Canadian football's last stand." Another suggested that if Baltimore wins, the opening lyrics to "O Canada" should be changed to "Uh-oh, Canada."Obviously, the Eastern Division title isn't the only thing at stake tomorrow in this snow-covered city. All of Canada is bracing for the inevitable nightmare of U.S. expansion -- a team composed entirely of Americans in the Grey Cup final.If Baltimore wins, the CFL quota requiring Canadian teams to carry 20 Canadian-born players almost certainly will be reduced.
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NEWS
By Amanda Frost | June 13, 2014
On Monday, the Supreme Court dashed the hopes of noncitizen children who had already waited years for visas to come to the United States with their families. Federal law allows immigrants to bring their unmarried, minor children with them to the U.S., but those same laws put strict annual quotas on visas, forcing applicants to wait years for a visa to become available. If the children turn 21 years old during that waiting period, they must be left behind. In its decision in Mayorkas v. Cuellar de Osorio, the high court held that these older children must get in the back of a new line and start the visa petition process all over again, denying them credit for the years they have already spent waiting.
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EXPLORE
January 17, 2012
I was shocked by a recent article that described a driving under the influence of alcohol case in Howard County wherein a Howard County judge dismissed a DUI charge against a 22-year-old woman because the judge believed the police may have been operating under some instructions that sounded a lot like a "quota" system. The Howard County police responded that some federal grant money they had been given had some "strings," some requirements if you will, that when spelled out in an email sounded a lot like a quota system.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Administrative law judges who evaluate disability claims for the Social Security Administration want a federal court to ease a workload that they say makes errors more likely - the latest in a series of challenges confronting the Woodlawn-based agency. In a federal lawsuit filed this month, 1,400 judges said the agency's expectation that they decide as many as 700 claims per year is causing them to rush evaluations and possibly approve claims that should be denied, at a potential cost of millions of taxpayer dollars.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Administrative law judges who evaluate disability claims for the Social Security Administration want a federal court to ease a workload that they say makes errors more likely - the latest in a series of challenges confronting the Woodlawn-based agency. In a federal lawsuit filed this month, 1,400 judges said the agency's expectation that they decide as many as 700 claims per year is causing them to rush evaluations and possibly approve claims that should be denied, at a potential cost of millions of taxpayer dollars.
NEWS
By Michael Hoffman and Michael Hoffman,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2005
A portion of the Baltimore Police Department's performance evaluation system, which drew criticism from city leaders who said it resembled a quota system, was ended yesterday after a meeting between police officials and City Council members. Police also said the program will be reviewed. Several council members, led by Councilman Kenneth N. Harris Sr., feared that the form patrol officers had to complete, which required them to furnish enforcement statistics such as arrests and traffic stops, gave the program the appearance of a quota system.
NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2006
A top Baltimore police official yesterday disputed accusations made by a city councilman that officers are being forced to make more arrests as part of a department-wide arrest quota system. "The department does not operate under an arrest quota system," Deputy Commissioner Marcus Brown wrote in a letter to City Councilman Kenneth N. Harris Sr. "It operates under a crime reduction system." Harris sent a memo late last month to Brown, alleging that officers have complained to him that they "are being forced to increase arrests versus focusing on the quality of arrest."
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2005
A performance evaluation system launched by the Baltimore Police Department with transfers of the 27 lowest-rated patrol officers is under fire from critics, who view it as a quota system that could lead to civil rights violations by emphasizing arrests. The criticism - from a city councilman and the police union - escalated yesterday with disclosure by the union president that a Northern District lieutenant also had instituted his own unique program giving scores to his officers for performance ranging from one point per traffic citation to 10 for a gun arrest.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 12, 1993
BRUSSELS, Belgium -- European Community leaders gave full support yesterday to demands by France that its system of protecting and subsidizing its movie industry be preserved in any world trade agreement.This subsidy system, bitterly contested by Washington and Hollywood, has become the chief remaining obstacle in the 7-year-old trade negotiations on the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT).Those talks -- aimed at updating and extending trade rules to stimulate the world economy -- continued in Geneva yesterday, with 116 countries trying to meet a Wednesday deadline.
NEWS
By Tyler Marshall, Evelyn Iritani and Marla Dickerson and Tyler Marshall, Evelyn Iritani and Marla Dickerson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 23, 2005
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- As a poor nation struggling to compete in an increasingly globalized economy, Cambodia has little to offer factory owner Leon Hsu. Electricity is erratic. Traffic along the road to the port of Sihanoukville includes the occasional elephant. If a truckload of men's shirts doesn't reach the port on time, it might be days before another vessel departs for Singapore, where goods are transferred to a larger ship for the voyage to the United States. None of that much mattered over the years because international quotas guaranteed Cambodia the chance to sell clothing and textiles to retailers in rich, developed nations.
EXPLORE
January 17, 2012
I was shocked by a recent article that described a driving under the influence of alcohol case in Howard County wherein a Howard County judge dismissed a DUI charge against a 22-year-old woman because the judge believed the police may have been operating under some instructions that sounded a lot like a "quota" system. The Howard County police responded that some federal grant money they had been given had some "strings," some requirements if you will, that when spelled out in an email sounded a lot like a quota system.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | October 1, 2006
Wholesale arrests made without regard for evidence of a crime are crimes in themselves. Murder and mayhem descending indiscriminately upon the citizenry are equally intolerable. Welcome to the world of unhappy choices facing a big-city mayor. A city cannot prosper if random slayings are an undisturbed fact of life. And young black men, already prone to lifelong involvement in the criminal justice system, should not be subjected to random arrest - and the arrest records that follow. It is the latter possibility that draws the attention of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. in his new round of campaign advertisements on the radio.
NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2006
A top Baltimore police official yesterday disputed accusations made by a city councilman that officers are being forced to make more arrests as part of a department-wide arrest quota system. "The department does not operate under an arrest quota system," Deputy Commissioner Marcus Brown wrote in a letter to City Councilman Kenneth N. Harris Sr. "It operates under a crime reduction system." Harris sent a memo late last month to Brown, alleging that officers have complained to him that they "are being forced to increase arrests versus focusing on the quality of arrest."
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2005
A City Council report released yesterday concluded that the Baltimore Police Department does not have arrest quotas and recommended that officials make it easier for people to expunge their records when they are arrested but never formally charged with a crime. A City Council subcommittee scrutinized these two topics after news reports highlighted complaints from the police union over the inner workings of a "performance enhancement program" for officers. "When we looked at what the enhancement program was doing, never in any way did it say, `You had to have quotas,'" said Councilman James B. Kraft, chairman of the Public Safety Committee, which wrote the report.
NEWS
By Michael Hoffman and Michael Hoffman,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2005
A portion of the Baltimore Police Department's performance evaluation system, which drew criticism from city leaders who said it resembled a quota system, was ended yesterday after a meeting between police officials and City Council members. Police also said the program will be reviewed. Several council members, led by Councilman Kenneth N. Harris Sr., feared that the form patrol officers had to complete, which required them to furnish enforcement statistics such as arrests and traffic stops, gave the program the appearance of a quota system.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2005
A performance evaluation system launched by the Baltimore Police Department with transfers of the 27 lowest-rated patrol officers is under fire from critics, who view it as a quota system that could lead to civil rights violations by emphasizing arrests. The criticism - from a city councilman and the police union - escalated yesterday with disclosure by the union president that a Northern District lieutenant also had instituted his own unique program giving scores to his officers for performance ranging from one point per traffic citation to 10 for a gun arrest.
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | November 8, 1991
Decision time. Which would you rather do: gun waterfowl or catch a rockfish.Next weekend, you have to choose -- and both honkers and rockfish appear plentiful.Late yesterday afternoon, the Department of Natural Resources LTC decided to reopen the rockfish charterboat season Oct. 15-16, which by coincidence is the first weekend of Maryland's Canada goose shoot that opens Tuesday.It was after a DNR review that it was decided charters fell 10 percent shy of their quota of 161,206 pounds. The season, which was scheduled to continue through Monday, was aborted Oct. 29 because preliminary figures indicated charters had exceeded their quota.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | October 1, 2006
Wholesale arrests made without regard for evidence of a crime are crimes in themselves. Murder and mayhem descending indiscriminately upon the citizenry are equally intolerable. Welcome to the world of unhappy choices facing a big-city mayor. A city cannot prosper if random slayings are an undisturbed fact of life. And young black men, already prone to lifelong involvement in the criminal justice system, should not be subjected to random arrest - and the arrest records that follow. It is the latter possibility that draws the attention of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. in his new round of campaign advertisements on the radio.
NEWS
By Tyler Marshall, Evelyn Iritani and Marla Dickerson and Tyler Marshall, Evelyn Iritani and Marla Dickerson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 23, 2005
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- As a poor nation struggling to compete in an increasingly globalized economy, Cambodia has little to offer factory owner Leon Hsu. Electricity is erratic. Traffic along the road to the port of Sihanoukville includes the occasional elephant. If a truckload of men's shirts doesn't reach the port on time, it might be days before another vessel departs for Singapore, where goods are transferred to a larger ship for the voyage to the United States. None of that much mattered over the years because international quotas guaranteed Cambodia the chance to sell clothing and textiles to retailers in rich, developed nations.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | November 19, 1994
WINNIPEG, Manitoba -- One Winnipeg columnist called it "Canadian football's last stand." Another suggested that if Baltimore wins, the opening lyrics to "O Canada" should be changed to "Uh-oh, Canada."Obviously, the Eastern Division title isn't the only thing at stake tomorrow in this snow-covered city. All of Canada is bracing for the inevitable nightmare of U.S. expansion -- a team composed entirely of Americans in the Grey Cup final.If Baltimore wins, the CFL quota requiring Canadian teams to carry 20 Canadian-born players almost certainly will be reduced.
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