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By Tim Smith | April 18, 2002
Pro Musica Rara, noted for its commitment to historically authentic instruments, devotes most of its attention to the 17th and 18th centuries. This weekend, the focus will spread to the 19th with performances of Schumann's rapturous Piano Quintet and some pieces by Chopin using a newly built re-creation of a fortepiano much like the one Schumann and wife Clara owned. Pianist Edmund Battersby will be the featured artist. He will be joined in the Schumann work by Pro Musica regulars Greg Mulligan and Ivan Stefanovic (violins)
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Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
For years, Steve Whiteman considered his old band, Kix, a forgotten relic of the '80s hair-metal scene. Even when the quintet began playing one-off reunion shows about a decade ago, the Hagerstown native viewed the gigs as cashing in on nostalgia. The “stupid money” offered, he said, did not hurt either. It took a trip to the Midwest in 2008 to unexpectedly change the singer's mind. The band was in the small town of Pryor Creek, Okla., for the multiday rock 'n' roll festival Rocklahoma, and Whiteman arrived unsure of what to expect.
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By Stephen Wigler and By Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 19, 1997
Franz Schubert never heard his Quintet in C; he composed it in September of 1828. On November 19, he died.He would have been pleased by last night's performance in Meyerhoff Hall on the next-to-last program of the Baltimore Symphony's Summer MusicFest.The composer surely understood how the difficulties -- both technical and musical -- of the Quintet. There are moments when the five instruments -- two violins, a viola and two cellos -- must sound like 100. And there is not a single moment in this taxing, 40-minute work in which each player, whether assigned to sustained or agitated melodic lines, can afford to neglect what his partners are doing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Names are not what they seem for the Baltimore rock quintet Vinny Vegas. Start with the band's name: It is not the alter ego of lead singer Scott Siskind, but rather an obscure reference to a professional wrestler from the early '90s. Then there's the title of the group's debut album, November's “The Big White Whale,” whose vinyl release will be celebrated at a Vinny Vegas-headlining show at Metro Gallery on Saturday. Despite cover art that depicts a diver next to a massive whale, Siskind said the title has nothing to do with Herman Melville's novel.
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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2005
Harry Steyert, a big-band clarinetist who later led his own quintet, died of cancer Friday at his Eldersburg home. He was 83. Born in Emmaus, Pa., he moved with his family to Baltimore's Hamilton section in 1935. He was a 1940 City College graduate and earned a business degree from the University of Baltimore. He met his wife of 62 years, the former Dorothy Reamy, when he was playing in the orchestra pit of the old State Theater on East Monument Street. She worked at a nearby record store.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
A hotshot quintet called Classical Jam — Jennifer Choi, violin; Cyrus Beroukhim, viola; Wendy Law, cello; Marco Granados, flute; Justin Hines, percussion — was formed recently "to reach out to diverse audiences" and promote classical music "to people who feel that they cannot relate to it, or for one reason or another, are not exposed to it." One way Classical Jam fulfills that mission is through collaborative projects and the creation of new music. The ensemble is heading to Maryland for a residency next week at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda and a side trip to Baltimore that promises interesting sounds for veteran and novice classical music listeners alike.
NEWS
By ROSALIE M. FALTER | January 16, 1995
On Saturday, the Performing Arts Association of Linthicum will present the next concert in its 1994-1995 season. The Warsaw Wind Quintet with Michiko Otaki, pianist, will perform on the stage of the new North County High School auditorium at 8 p.m.The quintet was formed in Warsaw, Poland, in 1973 by major soloists from the National Philharmonic and Radio Orchestras. They have played in the former Soviet Union and throughout Europe. The quintet regularly records for the Polish RTV and West Berlin Radio.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 2, 2007
The music season heated up some more over the weekend, with the help of interesting, effectively delivered repertoire. After an early-September, nonsubscription event featuring Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, the Shriver Hall Concert Series opened its annual classical series Sunday evening at the Johns Hopkins University with the superb Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet. The program provided an immersion course in French music for flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and horn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
Sometimes, a band is born from a riff. Last year, as senior jazz majors in Towson University's music program, Dan Ryan and Greg Wellham built the foundation of their first song, “Find You,” around a circular guitar pattern. As the song crystalized, the friends quickly realized there was potential to turn a simple jam session into something more serious. Wellham, 24, named the Baltimore act Super City (“It's just a cool, simple name to remember,” he said), which has since grown into a quintet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 18, 2007
Their luck was messed up for so long that the guys of Blue October decided to call their latest album Foiled. "Every time we took a step, something pushed us two steps back," says Justin Furstenfeld, the modern-rock band's spiky-haired focal point and lead singer. "We might as well just say it: We're foiled." After a decade of personal and artistic ups and downs, after being signed, dropped, then re-signed to Universal Records, Blue October has finally arrived, so to speak. Unexpectedly, Foiled has become the Houston quintet's biggest album.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
Sometimes, a band is born from a riff. Last year, as senior jazz majors in Towson University's music program, Dan Ryan and Greg Wellham built the foundation of their first song, “Find You,” around a circular guitar pattern. As the song crystalized, the friends quickly realized there was potential to turn a simple jam session into something more serious. Wellham, 24, named the Baltimore act Super City (“It's just a cool, simple name to remember,” he said), which has since grown into a quintet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
As the lead singer of the Baltimore feminist punk band War On Women, Shawna Potter occasionally encounters brash harassment from men in the crowds. Some might internalize or bury the anger that results from such sexism, but the 31-year-old has no problem addressing an agitator head-on, as she did in Los Angeles in February. Make comments about Potter's body, and prepare to be embarrassed. “When things like that happen, I'm still shocked,” Potter said last week from a love seat in Big Crunch, the Johnston Square instrument repair shop she manages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
The flier may have read “record release show,” but Mt. Royal's concert last Saturday in Charles Village felt more like a celebratory gathering of close friends and family. Minutes before taking the stage, Katrina Ford, the rock quintet's striking lead singer whose huge voice has seized ears for years in her other group, Celebration, mingled with her husband and others on the Ottobar's narrow balcony. Later, in between songs, Ford - dressed in all black with boots that went above her knees - smiled widely as she waved to familiar faces in the full crowd.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | November 11, 2012
Music director Jason Love will not be wielding his baton when the Columbia Orchestra gives a free chamber concert on Saturday, Nov. 17, at 7:30 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church, in Columbia. The nine orchestra members performing in this concert have picked the repertory on their own and also are making their own interpretive decisions about how to play it. Lest you think there has been a palace revolt, Love is all for it. "There are so many great players in the orchestra and sometimes the individuals are lost in the 90-piece orchestra, so it's great to hear them" in smaller ensembles, Love says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Appropriately rising from punk graves in late October, Baltimore quintet Sick Weapons -- which disbanded after a Golden West Café performance in late December 2010 -- has reunited, and will finally release its debut album, "Birthday Gift," early next month. The album will come out as a joint release from two Baltimore labels, Reptilian Records and the formerly defunct McCarthyism Records (run by Josh Sisk , a frequent photographer for The Baltimore Sun). The maroon-vinyl record will first be available at Day 1 of Unregistered Nurse Booking's U+Nfest at Metro Gallery on Nov. 9, which Sick Weapons will headline.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
The passing of time is impossible to ignore, but Motion City Soundtrack's Justin Pierre tried his hardest for more than a decade. "I spent a good, long chunk of my life - 15 years, I'd say - not really living in the moment but rather avoiding the moment," Pierre said. A couple of years ago, the lead singer, now 36, looked at his family and suddenly knew he had to change his perspective. "My brother has a kid. Some of my siblings are married. My parents are grandparents," he said.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2004
Painters provide us with landscapes and seascapes. Leave it to five of the world's finest musicians to throw in a windscape as well. Windscape, which performs Saturday evening in Columbia under the aegis of Howard County's Candlelight Concert Society, is one of the most eminent woodwind quintets, a combination of flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and French horn. Created in 1994 by five of New York City's best, the quintet has spent the past decade charming and edifying audiences with thematic programs such as "Beethoven Comes to Vienna," "East Meets West: The Music of Japan and the Impressionists" and "The Fabulous Fifties."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
As the lead singer of the Baltimore feminist punk band War On Women, Shawna Potter occasionally encounters brash harassment from men in the crowds. Some might internalize or bury the anger that results from such sexism, but the 31-year-old has no problem addressing an agitator head-on, as she did in Los Angeles in February. Make comments about Potter's body, and prepare to be embarrassed. “When things like that happen, I'm still shocked,” Potter said last week from a love seat in Big Crunch, the Johnston Square instrument repair shop she manages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2011
The most distinctive piece of the National, an indie-rock quintet from Brooklyn, N.Y.-via-Cincinnati, is lead singer Matt Berninger's slurred baritone. It's a smooth, low purr that, when combined with the band's circular guitars and Bryan Devendorf's expert drumming, lulls listeners into a trance. This combination has led to great success, including 2010's High Violet, a gold record that debuted No. 3 on the Billboard 200 and won Q magazine's best album of the year. Tuesday, the National will be at Merriweather Post Pavilion . Bassist Scott Devendorf took time from the band's European festival run to talk about High Violet's success, tour-mates Wye Oak and the group's support of President Obama.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
A hotshot quintet called Classical Jam — Jennifer Choi, violin; Cyrus Beroukhim, viola; Wendy Law, cello; Marco Granados, flute; Justin Hines, percussion — was formed recently "to reach out to diverse audiences" and promote classical music "to people who feel that they cannot relate to it, or for one reason or another, are not exposed to it." One way Classical Jam fulfills that mission is through collaborative projects and the creation of new music. The ensemble is heading to Maryland for a residency next week at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda and a side trip to Baltimore that promises interesting sounds for veteran and novice classical music listeners alike.
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