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By Jimmy Schmidt and Jimmy Schmidt,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 18, 1992
In case you haven't discovered it, let me tell you about an age-old grain that is migrating from health food stores to grocery store shelves.Some are even calling it the super grain of the future.That's ironic, considering that quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is an ancient grain that originated in the Andes region of South America. It was one of three staples of the Incas, along with maize (corn) and the potato. Although it was a significant source of protein in the Inca diet, it was overlooked by the Spanish explorers.
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SPORTS
August 26, 2013
(Courtesy of Jenny Perez) Step one 1 cup of quinoa 2 cups water 1 tsp turmeric 1 tsp pink salt (Pink or Himalayan salt. You can use regular table salt as well.) Place quinoa, salt, turmeric, and water in a 1-1/2 quart saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, cover and cook until all the water is absorbed (about 15 minutes). Set aside to cool. Step two 2 carrots, peeled and chopped 1 stalk minced celery 1/4 cup finely diced red onion 1/4 cup fresh chopped cilantro 1 teaspoon cumin powder    Pinch of cayenne Place chopped veggies in a bowl.
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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | January 9, 2008
In a month when we're all searching for healthful food, quinoa, an ancient staple of the Andes Mountains, is a great place to turn. For those with celiac disease, it's a gluten-free grain; for vegans, a complete protein. It's a cereal, a pilaf, a whole-grain crust, a vegetable stuffer, a surprise binder in baked goods. Quinoa (pronounced keen-wa) seems to speak the language of every cuisine. And when its germ uncoils during cooking, a batch of quinoa resembles tiny bubbles, ready to add zip rather than weight to a more healthful diet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
My friend Meredith, who teaches power yoga and is a health fanatic, made this salad for an employee party at the YMCA where she works, and it was voted best recipe. It's both healthy (lots of red and orange superfood peppers!) and delicious -- and the recipe makes a vat of salad, so it's great for a party. The recipe comes from Clean Eating magazine. It called for frozen corn, but I've changed that to fresh. Clean Eating claimed that it took 20 minutes to make this. It took me a whole lot longer.
NEWS
April 23, 2008
Quinoa-and-Radish Salad With Avocado Dressing Serves 6 as a side dish 1 avocado, pitted and peeled 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons white-wine vinegar 1 tablespoon walnut oil 1/2 tablespoon salt freshly ground black pepper 2 cups diced, cored tomatoes (see note) 2 cups thinly sliced radishes 3 cups cooked quinoa, cooled In a food processor or blender, combine avocado, olive oil, vinegar, walnut oil, salt and pepper to taste. Process until smooth and blended.
NEWS
By Carla Correa and Carla Correa,Sun reporter | May 7, 2008
Gluten-Free Girl How I Found the Food That Loves Me Back ... & How You Can Too Gluten-Free, Wheat-Free & Dairy-Free Recipes More Than 100 Mouth-Watering Recipes for the Whole Family By Grace Cheetham Duncan Baird / 2007 / $19.95 Perhaps nothing shouts "special diet" as much as the title of this book. But Grace Cheetham's collection has range and depth. I wanted to try her prosciutto and arugula pizza with dairy-free cheese, but I couldn't find gram flour at the market. Luckily, her cakes without milk, cream and butter piqued my curiosity, too. I baked two - a classic flourless chocolate cake and a more original lemon polenta cake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | laura.vozzella@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 24, 2010
The roasted shank bone in the center of the table says it all: Passover is one meat-centric holiday. Symbolism, tradition and religious dietary restrictions tend to make the festival of the unleavened bread into an eight-night parade of brisket, lamb and chicken. That poses a challenge for Jewish vegetarians. Passing on traditional meat main courses can leave little else to eat. Pastas and rice are out. Ashkenazi Jews do not eat legumes during the holiday, prohibiting the beans and tofu that are often at the center of vegetarian meals.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2010
Spring officially arrived, thank goodness. We're ready for the bounty of herbs soon to come. Happily, a recent meal at T'afia, an eclectic restaurant in Houston, made our herb-loving hearts beat faster. Chef Monica Pope served a mound of red quinoa with quickly seared scallops and an herb-laden sauce that we nearly licked off the plate. We started garden-planning immediately: flat-leaf parsley for flower-bed borders everywhere. Plenty of pots of tender cilantro near the back door for easy kitchen use. The inspirational sauce, a Moroccan staple known as chermoula, uses lots of parsley and aromatic cilantro.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2008
You might think of radishes as small and crunchy, insignificant bits of color to add to a salad or side dish. But radishes were once so venerated in Greece that gold replicas were made, according to the Centers for Disease Control's produce education Web site. And in Oaxaca, Mexico, radishes star in a Christmastime festival in which they're used to make elaborate sculptures. The most common radish is the Red Globe, the small round version with leafy green tops you might see in your local grocery store or farmers' market.
FEATURES
By Desiree Vivea and Desiree Vivea,Copley News Service | July 3, 1991
There are lots of excellent vegetarian cookbooks out there -- have been for years. And great microwave cookbooks, a more recent trend, also abound. But until now, no book that I'm aware of has combined both culinary worlds.Pat Baird's recently published "Quick Harvest: A Vegetarian's Guide to Microwave Cooking" couples the ease of microwaving with the health and flavor of delicious vegetarian cookery.None of the more than 150 recipes contains any red meat, poultry or fish. Many do call for dairy products (cheese, milk, eggs)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2010
Spring officially arrived, thank goodness. We're ready for the bounty of herbs soon to come. Happily, a recent meal at T'afia, an eclectic restaurant in Houston, made our herb-loving hearts beat faster. Chef Monica Pope served a mound of red quinoa with quickly seared scallops and an herb-laden sauce that we nearly licked off the plate. We started garden-planning immediately: flat-leaf parsley for flower-bed borders everywhere. Plenty of pots of tender cilantro near the back door for easy kitchen use. The inspirational sauce, a Moroccan staple known as chermoula, uses lots of parsley and aromatic cilantro.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | laura.vozzella@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 24, 2010
The roasted shank bone in the center of the table says it all: Passover is one meat-centric holiday. Symbolism, tradition and religious dietary restrictions tend to make the festival of the unleavened bread into an eight-night parade of brisket, lamb and chicken. That poses a challenge for Jewish vegetarians. Passing on traditional meat main courses can leave little else to eat. Pastas and rice are out. Ashkenazi Jews do not eat legumes during the holiday, prohibiting the beans and tofu that are often at the center of vegetarian meals.
NEWS
By Carla Correa and Carla Correa,Sun reporter | May 7, 2008
Gluten-Free Girl How I Found the Food That Loves Me Back ... & How You Can Too Gluten-Free, Wheat-Free & Dairy-Free Recipes More Than 100 Mouth-Watering Recipes for the Whole Family By Grace Cheetham Duncan Baird / 2007 / $19.95 Perhaps nothing shouts "special diet" as much as the title of this book. But Grace Cheetham's collection has range and depth. I wanted to try her prosciutto and arugula pizza with dairy-free cheese, but I couldn't find gram flour at the market. Luckily, her cakes without milk, cream and butter piqued my curiosity, too. I baked two - a classic flourless chocolate cake and a more original lemon polenta cake.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2008
You might think of radishes as small and crunchy, insignificant bits of color to add to a salad or side dish. But radishes were once so venerated in Greece that gold replicas were made, according to the Centers for Disease Control's produce education Web site. And in Oaxaca, Mexico, radishes star in a Christmastime festival in which they're used to make elaborate sculptures. The most common radish is the Red Globe, the small round version with leafy green tops you might see in your local grocery store or farmers' market.
NEWS
April 23, 2008
Quinoa-and-Radish Salad With Avocado Dressing Serves 6 as a side dish 1 avocado, pitted and peeled 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons white-wine vinegar 1 tablespoon walnut oil 1/2 tablespoon salt freshly ground black pepper 2 cups diced, cored tomatoes (see note) 2 cups thinly sliced radishes 3 cups cooked quinoa, cooled In a food processor or blender, combine avocado, olive oil, vinegar, walnut oil, salt and pepper to taste. Process until smooth and blended.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | January 9, 2008
In a month when we're all searching for healthful food, quinoa, an ancient staple of the Andes Mountains, is a great place to turn. For those with celiac disease, it's a gluten-free grain; for vegans, a complete protein. It's a cereal, a pilaf, a whole-grain crust, a vegetable stuffer, a surprise binder in baked goods. Quinoa (pronounced keen-wa) seems to speak the language of every cuisine. And when its germ uncoils during cooking, a batch of quinoa resembles tiny bubbles, ready to add zip rather than weight to a more healthful diet.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1994
Planting an ideaThe words "endangered species" bring to most people's minds the image of pandas, grizzly bears and Siberian white tigers. But another kind of species depredation is going on, and it's something that most of us can do something to halt."
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2001
SILVER SPRING - They did everything but kiss babies. Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan were ostensibly touring redeveloped parts of Silver Spring yesterday, but their two-hour visit had all the trappings of a gubernatorial campaign swing. With a battery of cameras recording their every move, the two shook hands with cops, walked through a new office building and sampled lemon quinoa (a $6.99 a pound couscous-like dish) at a yuppie grocery store.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2001
SILVER SPRING - They did everything but kiss babies. Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan were ostensibly touring redeveloped parts of Silver Spring yesterday, but their two-hour visit had all the trappings of a gubernatorial campaign swing. With a battery of cameras recording their every move, the two shook hands with cops, walked through a new office building and sampled lemon quinoa (a $6.99 a pound couscous-like dish) at a yuppie grocery store.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1994
Planting an ideaThe words "endangered species" bring to most people's minds the image of pandas, grizzly bears and Siberian white tigers. But another kind of species depredation is going on, and it's something that most of us can do something to halt."
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