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NEWS
October 5, 2005
Suddenly, on October 3, 2005, RITA HELEN QUINLAN (nee Beagan), beloved wife of William J. Quinlan, Sr., loving and devoted mother of Claudia Moore and her husband David, Barbara Bach and her husband Phil, William J. Quinlan, Jr. and his wife Katie, Stacey Bach and her husband Doug and the late Gregory Quinlan. Cherished "Grandmar" of David, Billy, Briana, Alison, Brett, Patrick, Laura, Jack, Kelly, Emily, Rebecca and Shawn. Dear sister of Lorraine Nelson. Also survived by many loving family members and friends.
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SPORTS
By Glenn Graham | January 5, 2012
At the midway point in the season, the Glenelg Country boys basketball team is still getting settled into the demanding Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference after moving up from the B Conference. Coach Kevin Quinlan has continually preached a "one quarter at a time"  approach, and Tuesday it helped produce the program's biggest win to date when the Dragons (7-6) upset perennial league power and No. 6 St. Frances, 57-55. For Quinlan, who led the Dragons to the B Conference crown and a 28-3 mark in his first season last year, there was little time to celebrate - the team travels to Loyola on Friday.
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NEWS
March 24, 2003
On March 22, 2003, PATRICIA R. QUINLAN (nee Robinson); beloved wife of Donald L. Quinlan; loving sister of John L. Robinson; dear niece of Lavella C. Barrett; devoted aunt of Nicole L. Middlebrooks and Johnathan L. Robinson; dearest friend of Ara O'Hara (A.J.) and Susan Agnes; devoted daughter of the late Willam and Doris Robinson. A Memorial Service will be celebrated in the Hope Presbyterian Church, 4748 Shelbourne Road, Baltimore, MD 21227, on Saturday, March 29 at 12 noon. In lieu of flowers, donations may be directed to the St. Agnes Homecare and Hospice, 3421 Benson Avenue Suite G100, Baltimore, MD 21227.
NEWS
February 27, 2007
Funeral services for Army Chief Warrant Officer John A. Quinlan, a former Baltimore County resident and graduate of Dulaney High school, will be held at Arlington National Cemetery in Washington at 2 p.m. today, according to military officials. Chief Warrant Officer Quinlan, the father of three, was one of eight soldiers killed Feb. 18 in Afghanistan when the helicopter he was piloting crashed because of mechanical failure. The crash, which was not caused by enemy fire, was the deadliest incident in Afghanistan this year.
NEWS
February 27, 2007
Funeral services for Army Chief Warrant Officer John A. Quinlan, a former Baltimore County resident and graduate of Dulaney High school, will be held at Arlington National Cemetery in Washington at 2 p.m. today, according to military officials. Chief Warrant Officer Quinlan, the father of three, was one of eight soldiers killed Feb. 18 in Afghanistan when the helicopter he was piloting crashed because of mechanical failure. The crash, which was not caused by enemy fire, was the deadliest incident in Afghanistan this year.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2002
Dorothy J. Quinlan, a retired media specialist who read thousands of books out of a combined sense of duty and unbounded curiosity, died of heart disease Wednesday at her Columbia home. She was 87. When a bad back forced Mrs. Quinlan to quit teaching physical education in the 1950s, she threw herself into library science with a passion. To prepare herself for questions from high school students looking to check out items, she took home books by the carton every few weeks. She loved mysteries and biographies, but she would read anything -- often staying up into the early hours of the morning.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | February 21, 2007
A Dulaney High School graduate and father of three was one of eight soldiers who died Sunday in Afghanistan when the helicopter he was piloting crashed because of mechanical failure, relatives said. Army Warrant Officer John A. Quinlan, 36, who grew up in northern Baltimore County, radioed that he had lost power shortly before the plane went down, said his father, Robert J. Quinlan of Bradley Beach, N.J. "He was fighting it all the way down, I'm sure," his father said.
NEWS
By Kory Dodd and Kory Dodd,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
A resolution scheduled for discussion at tomorrow's Annapolis city council meeting could reignite the city's long-standing debate over bar closing times in the city's downtown. The resolution, introduced by Ward 7 Alderman Michael W. Fox, would allow microbrewery pub owners to apply for an exemption that would allow them to remain open until 2 a.m. Fox said it is a first step in his plan to introduce legislation that would create a citywide exemption for microbreweries. But Ward 1 Alderwoman Louise Hammond and downtown residents are furious that the licensing issue is being revisited.
SPORTS
By Bill Free | February 19, 1994
LANDOVER -- The Washington Capitals announced yesterday that they were sending former head coach Terry Murray on loan to the Florida Panthers for the remainder of the season so he may coach the Cincinnati Cyclones of the International Hockey League.The Cyclones are the Panthers' top minor-league club.Murray will remain under contract to Washington this season and through the 1994-95 season.Washington vice president of communications Ed Quinlan said last night that the Capitals will continue to pay Murray this season but that they will be reimbursed by the Panthers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and By Chris Kridler,Special to the Sun | June 11, 2000
"The Best of Jackson Payne," by Jack Fuller. Alfred A. Knopf. 321 pages. $25. What's more problematic than a white biographer writing about a black jazz legend? Perhaps a white novelist writing about a white biographer writing about a black jazz legend. "The Best of Jackson Payne" manages to take this source of discomfort and turn it into an asset. This tension drives the novel, almost more than the book's intriguing dissection of the life of this fictional man. Jack Fuller, who manages to find time to be president of Tribune Publishing Co. while he's writing novels, begins with words from James Baldwin: "... by means of what the white man imagines the black man to be, the black man is enabled to know who the white man is."
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | February 21, 2007
A Dulaney High School graduate and father of three was one of eight soldiers who died Sunday in Afghanistan when the helicopter he was piloting crashed because of mechanical failure, relatives said. Army Warrant Officer John A. Quinlan, 36, who grew up in northern Baltimore County, radioed that he had lost power shortly before the plane went down, said his father, Robert J. Quinlan of Bradley Beach, N.J. "He was fighting it all the way down, I'm sure," his father said.
NEWS
October 5, 2005
Suddenly, on October 3, 2005, RITA HELEN QUINLAN (nee Beagan), beloved wife of William J. Quinlan, Sr., loving and devoted mother of Claudia Moore and her husband David, Barbara Bach and her husband Phil, William J. Quinlan, Jr. and his wife Katie, Stacey Bach and her husband Doug and the late Gregory Quinlan. Cherished "Grandmar" of David, Billy, Briana, Alison, Brett, Patrick, Laura, Jack, Kelly, Emily, Rebecca and Shawn. Dear sister of Lorraine Nelson. Also survived by many loving family members and friends.
NEWS
March 24, 2003
On March 22, 2003, PATRICIA R. QUINLAN (nee Robinson); beloved wife of Donald L. Quinlan; loving sister of John L. Robinson; dear niece of Lavella C. Barrett; devoted aunt of Nicole L. Middlebrooks and Johnathan L. Robinson; dearest friend of Ara O'Hara (A.J.) and Susan Agnes; devoted daughter of the late Willam and Doris Robinson. A Memorial Service will be celebrated in the Hope Presbyterian Church, 4748 Shelbourne Road, Baltimore, MD 21227, on Saturday, March 29 at 12 noon. In lieu of flowers, donations may be directed to the St. Agnes Homecare and Hospice, 3421 Benson Avenue Suite G100, Baltimore, MD 21227.
NEWS
By Kory Dodd and Kory Dodd,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
A resolution scheduled for discussion at tomorrow's Annapolis city council meeting could reignite the city's long-standing debate over bar closing times in the city's downtown. The resolution, introduced by Ward 7 Alderman Michael W. Fox, would allow microbrewery pub owners to apply for an exemption that would allow them to remain open until 2 a.m. Fox said it is a first step in his plan to introduce legislation that would create a citywide exemption for microbreweries. But Ward 1 Alderwoman Louise Hammond and downtown residents are furious that the licensing issue is being revisited.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2002
Dorothy J. Quinlan, a retired media specialist who read thousands of books out of a combined sense of duty and unbounded curiosity, died of heart disease Wednesday at her Columbia home. She was 87. When a bad back forced Mrs. Quinlan to quit teaching physical education in the 1950s, she threw herself into library science with a passion. To prepare herself for questions from high school students looking to check out items, she took home books by the carton every few weeks. She loved mysteries and biographies, but she would read anything -- often staying up into the early hours of the morning.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | December 6, 2000
"WHO'S THE boss? The cop or the law?" I wish that was original, but it comes from the 1958 film, directed by Orson Welles, called "Touch of Evil." Welles also starred in the film, playing a sheriff in an American town near the Mexican border who has a murder to solve. A man and woman have just been blown to bits in a car. The sheriff, Hank Quinlan, has a suspect, a Mexican-American youth who he believes rigged a bomb with some dynamite and hooked it to the vehicle that exploded. The distraught Mexican refuses to confess, so Quinlan waxes creative and plants some sticks of dynamite in the guy's apartment.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker | August 27, 1991
Telford didn't expect to be called up"Whatever it takes," he said. "It's just good to be back."Rhodes more settledTonight will be the home debut of highly touted Arthur Rhodes, and he hopes to be "a little more settled" than he was at Texas last week.In his first major-league start, Rhodes wild-pitched two runs home and allowed three in four innings to the Rangers."I've never been that nervous before out there," he said. "My mom and dad were there, and you're always nervous the first time.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | December 6, 2000
"WHO'S THE boss? The cop or the law?" I wish that was original, but it comes from the 1958 film, directed by Orson Welles, called "Touch of Evil." Welles also starred in the film, playing a sheriff in an American town near the Mexican border who has a murder to solve. A man and woman have just been blown to bits in a car. The sheriff, Hank Quinlan, has a suspect, a Mexican-American youth who he believes rigged a bomb with some dynamite and hooked it to the vehicle that exploded. The distraught Mexican refuses to confess, so Quinlan waxes creative and plants some sticks of dynamite in the guy's apartment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and By Chris Kridler,Special to the Sun | June 11, 2000
"The Best of Jackson Payne," by Jack Fuller. Alfred A. Knopf. 321 pages. $25. What's more problematic than a white biographer writing about a black jazz legend? Perhaps a white novelist writing about a white biographer writing about a black jazz legend. "The Best of Jackson Payne" manages to take this source of discomfort and turn it into an asset. This tension drives the novel, almost more than the book's intriguing dissection of the life of this fictional man. Jack Fuller, who manages to find time to be president of Tribune Publishing Co. while he's writing novels, begins with words from James Baldwin: "... by means of what the white man imagines the black man to be, the black man is enabled to know who the white man is."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2000
For every Martin Luther King and Medgar Evers, for every martyr to the civil rights cause, there were thousands of other heroes who took similar risks, exhibited similar bravery and should be similarly celebrated. "Freedom Song," a tale of the civil rights movement set in the fictional town of Quinlan, Miss., in 1961, drives that point home with an emotional punch I suspect few will be able to resist. From the opening scenes, when a black father is forced to beat his own son by some white locals out for a few laughs, to the counter sit-ins and marches that eventually usher Quinlan into a time when equality just might be possible, it's a film that reminds us how truly depraved society once was. It also suggests that the greatest tragedy of the civil rights movement was that it forced everyday people to put their lives on the line to exercise such basic rights as voting and using public libraries.
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