Advertisement
HomeCollectionsQuilts
IN THE NEWS

Quilts

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 3, 2011
Elizabeth Scott, an art-quilt maker whose work was acclaimed by critics as "filled with hope and sadness and love," died of heart failure April 25 at her home in the Penn North section of West Baltimore. She was 95. Born Elizabeth Caldwell near Chester, S.C., she was a middle child of 14. Her family sharecropped vegetables and cotton on the plantation where her grandparents had been slaves. Her grandfather was a basket weaver, potter and blacksmith. Her father, a railroad worker, made quilts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
Under cloudy skies, volunteers were busy Saturday afternoon installing panels of the Monument Quilt on the verdant Federal Hill Park lawn. Walkers and tourists paused to read the emotionally wrenching messages - numbering in the hundreds - from survivors of rape and sexual abuse from across the country that are written on squares sewn into the multicolored and textured quilt. "I was scared, hiding my emotions away, hidden behind a mask that fooled people for years. I tore away the mask & began my long journey on the road to recovery.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
When Severn resident Joan M.E. Gaither was born nearly 70 years ago, the word "negro" was printed on her birth certificate. Gaither, an artist and retired educator, says she has channeled the hurt and humiliation she has endured from racism over the years into something positive - namely, her narrative quilt pieces, in which she aims to show the legacies and contributions of African-Americans and denounce the idea of racial segregation. "When I should die, I don't even care if my name is on my grave," she said.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
When Severn resident Joan M.E. Gaither was born nearly 70 years ago, the word "negro" was printed on her birth certificate. Gaither, an artist and retired educator, says she has channeled the hurt and humiliation she has endured from racism over the years into something positive - namely, her narrative quilt pieces, in which she aims to show the legacies and contributions of African-Americans and denounce the idea of racial segregation. "When I should die, I don't even care if my name is on my grave," she said.
NEWS
By JOAN D. McMAHON | December 22, 1992
Many quilting circles have their roots in the church or church-related activities. But recently I received a quizzical look from church members when I said that quilting is a spiritual endeavor.It helps us look at the way we learn about ourselves and our values. It connects us with others and the world around us. It is how we find meaning and purpose in life. Quilting explained a lot to me about the human spirit, our behaviors and our beliefs. In explaining the truths about quilting, I also discovered truths about being human.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby | February 5, 1998
Anyone who feels a creative urge is invited to the Maryland Institute, College of Art to sit at a communal quilt to stitch and talk -- and perhaps make new friends.This communal work-in-progress is part of an art exhibition that has as many pieces as the colorful quilts it showcases.At the show's center is an exhibit of 45 vivid works created by Baltimore's master-quilter Elizabeth Scott. The Scott retrospective, curated by George Ciscle, includes quilts with patterns ranging from traditional strips to whimsical critters.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | May 26, 1991
Q: I collect handmade quilts, especially those with designs that show some sort of optical illusion. Can you put me in touch with dealers who might have such quilts, or provide sources of information regarding instructions, patterns or designs?A: Among the most spectacular optical-illusion quilts are those made by textile artist Rebecca Shore. For more information, write to Carl Hammer Gallery, 200 W. Superior St., Chicago, Ill. 60610; phone (312) 266-8512.The fifth annual Contemporary Wall-Quilt Exhibition continues through June 1 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays to Saturdays at the Wild Goose Chase Quilt Gallery, 1511 Chicago Ave., Evanston, Ill. 60201-4405; phone (708)
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT | June 29, 2007
The Atlanta art dealers accused in a lawsuit of taking and not returning three heirloom quilts from a woman in Gee's Bend, Ala., have handed the quilts over to her attorney. After calling a news conference late Wednesday to dispute the charges, attorneys for art dealer William Arnett and his son Matt delivered the quilts to the Birmingham law office of Peter Burke. He represents Lucinda Pettway Franklin, one of the three plaintiffs in the dispute; she says the Arnetts took and held her quilts for two years.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen | May 9, 1993
The word "quilt" comes from the Latin "culcita," meaning stuffed sack or cushion. Quilting refers to the stitching holding together three layers: a pieced or appliqued cover, filling and backing. The earliest evidence of quilting is a circa-3400 B.C. carved ivory figure in the British Museum of an Egyptian pharaoh wearing what looks like a quilted mantle.Quilted clothing and bedding, primarily professionally made luxury goods for the wealthy, are mentioned in 13th-century French and Dutch accounts.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | July 1, 1994
Quilts have played a prominent role in Mount Airy's centennial year.The town's centennial quilt, made by 22 local women over the course of a year, features 26 town landmarks and hangs in Mount Airy's Town Hall.The quilt theme surfaces again this month in "Timeless Treasures: Mount Airy's Centennial Celebration Quilt Exhibit." The exhibit will feature about 40 antique quilts, most of which have been handed down through generations of local families.The quilts will be on display July 15-17 at the Mount Airy Senior Center, 703 Ridge Ave.Judy Elwood, a veteran quilter who coordinated the centennial quilt project, came up with the idea for the antique quilt display.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2014
Drive up and down the rolling hills on Uniontown Road in Westminster and you'll run into a red barn adorned with a placard painted with sunflowers. The barn on the Gardener's Gourmet farm is one of 12 rustic buildings getting decorated as part of a new community art project thought up by the Carroll County Arts Council. The placards are actually replicas of quilt panels. By placing the panels on highly visibly barns, the council hopes to highlight the art of quilting, the area's agricultural history and how they are tied together.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2013
The Civil War experience has been preserved over the past 150 years through a variety of media: books, newspaper accounts, films, drawings, paintings, diaries, artifacts and ... quilts. The quilting form will be discussed and displayed Sunday at the Captain Avery Museum in Shady Side, as Mavis Slawson, a textile historian and docent at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine, in Frederick, gives a presentation Sept. 8 on "Civil War Soldiers and Their Quilts. " Slawson said she hoped to convey that quilts provided more than just physical comfort to soldiers in the Civil War - they were also a source of emotional and spiritual solace for men who were a long way from home and in harm's way. "Many of these quilts had special meaning to the soldiers in the field or in the hospitals," said Slawson, a Columbia resident who is not only well-versed in the history of Civil War quilts but is an accomplished quilter herself.
EXPLORE
August 5, 2013
The winner of the 2012-13 Bel Air Lions quilt raffle, Fred Heffner, left, of Stewartstown, Pa., accepts his prize at the April 16 meeting. Also pictured is Rob Gangler, chairman for the raffle.
EXPLORE
July 23, 2012
Tibbi Kulwicki, of Abingdon, was the winner of the 2011-12 Bel Air Lions Club quilt raffle. Kulwicki accepted her prize at the April 17 meeting.
EXPLORE
May 8, 2012
They twist and they turn. They break up communities. They sprawl across jurisdictional boundaries. And, in something akin to cellular mitosis, one has been divided into two entities that are miles apart. "They" are the state legislative districts newly mapped out in Baltimore County. If you look up "crazy quilt," in the dictionary, an accompanying picture of the map would clearly illustrate the term. The whole once-a-decade enterprise smacks of partisanship and back-room political horse-trading, eliciting a cynical shrug.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Outhouses. Potbellied stoves. Four-mile walks in the snow. These are legacies of the Rosenwald Schools. For the past several weeks, county students have been studying the schools, a loosely affiliated network for African-American children that a white businessman, Julius Rosenwald, helped start with a grant in 1917. Twenty-three would spring up in Anne Arundel County alone. But what fascinated history students at North County High School in Glen Burnie and Southern High School in Harwood were the minutiae -- where children went to the bathroom, how they stayed warm and got to school, and what their classrooms looked like.
FEATURES
February 26, 1995
An exhibition of Upper Shenandoah Quilts made from 1840 to 1860, as well as contemporary quilts, will open on Saturday in one of the exhibition buildings at the Woodrow Wilson Birthplace and Museum in Staunton, Va.In conjunction with the exhibition, which runs through May 29, the museum is sponsoring related activities. These include demonstrations, lectures and films. Admission will be charged for some events.Daily hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in March; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in April and May. The exhibition itself is free; however, for the Wilson house and museum, where other other quilts can be seen, the charges for admission are: $6 for adults; $4 for students; $2 for children.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2011
A quilt made by a prominent African-American textile artist and teacher was stolen during a burglary this month from the Benjamin Banneker Historical Park and Museum in Oella, where it was on loan. The red-and-gold quilt owned by Joan M.E. Gaither, a former professor at the Maryland Institute College of Art , was missing after a break-in at the museum overnight on Dec. 19, Baltimore County police said. The burglar or burglars broke through a glass pane in a back door and threw a television, picture frame and a few items from the gift shop onto the floor.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2011
Pat Gardner, a quilt artist, teacher and lecturer, died Oct. 12 at Maryland Shock Trauma Center as the result of a fall she suffered Oct. 12. The Edenwald Retirement Community resident was 83. Born Patricia M. Zug in Reading, Pa., and raised in Richland, Pa., she earned a bachelor's degree in home economics education at Juniata College. She moved to Baltimore in 1951 and began her quilting career in the early 1970s, when she developed an interest in Baltimore and Pennsylvania antique quilts and other textiles.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.