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By Melinda Rice and Melinda Rice,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 1, 1997
RICHARD and Georgina Fries, Dick and Jean to their friends, missed last year's holiday quilt show at the State House even though Jean had two quilts on display. They were visiting one of their five children in Florida -- "our only live-away daughter," said Dick.Not this year.The Frieses (pronounced "Freeze," as in "Something will freeze over before the Frieses miss this year's show") are anxious to see the display, which will include one of Jean's quilts.Jean's is one of 19 full-sized quilts and a number of wall-hangings that will be on display until Dec. 31 as part of "A Holiday Salute to Maryland Quilters."
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
Susa Kessler, a retired World Bank analyst who had fled Nazi Germany as a child, died of breast cancer complications Tuesday at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Canton resident was 88. Born in Stuttgart, Germany, she was the daughter of Dr. Caesar Hirsch, an ear, nose and throat doctor, and Felicia Hearst. Family members said that her father heard that Adolf Hitler and his government planned to blacklist him because he was a Jew. "To avoid arrest, Dr. Hirsch sent his children to Switzerland in the company of their grandmother," said Ms. Kessler's son, John J. "Jack" Condliffe of Timonium.
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FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | September 16, 1990
The Maryland Quilt Documentation Project, like the works of textile art it chronicles and celebrates, is an elaborate patchwork. Its fabric was woven from the lives and handiwork of three centuries of Marylanders, and a busy corps of volunteers has been gathering all the patches of information and painstakingly stitching them together.And like an old quilt, the resulting document will be more than a compendium of calico. It will tell us not only about stitches and styles, but about the people who wielded the needles, their communities and the events that swirled around them as they worked.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2012
Elaine Karp-Gelernter, a retired Veterans Affairs psychologist who was also a textile artist, died of complications from pneumonia March 20 at Sinai Hospital. The Mount Washington resident was 78. She was the daughter of Polish immigrants who ran a custom-tailored bridal shop in New York City. She grew up in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn and earned a bachelor's degree in psychology from Brooklyn College. In 1952, she married Steve Karp, a psychologist. She and her family moved to Mount Washington in 1964.
NEWS
By Margaret Buchler and Margaret Buchler,Contributing writer | October 13, 1991
They speak of great-great-grandmothers; wool from father's flock; five-generation hand-me-downs; cotton batting with seeds because Eli Whitney hadn't appeared with his invention yet; family scrap bags of wedding dresses.There's a kind of comfort in quilts, to sit and sort over the bright patches woven warm with memories.But if the soul of quilting comes from the frugal fingertips of the Colonial grandmothers, its heart now lies in churches and shady lanes of Howard County, where the National Quilting Association is headquartered along with three of its sisterhood chapters.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2002
For more than 50 years, women like Velma Bowman and Essie Grossnickle have gathered weekly at a small church in Union Bridge. Over hundreds of yards of fabric, they have shared their lives and their skills and nearly always donated the results of their efforts to charity. Their latest endeavor - a large navy and white coverlet with 16 diamond-shapes stitched into each square - goes on the auction block tomorrow. The ladies expect spirited bidding. At the Mid-Atlantic Disaster Response Auction in Westminster last year, one quilt sold for $3,100 and the total sold topped $30,000, money that went to worldwide disaster relief.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 2002
THE SPIRIT of giving is practiced all year long by members of the Friendship Quilters of Linthicum. Early in February, the group begins creating handmade quilts of different shapes, designs and colors for donation. They call it their yearly "love project." Every year, they do at least one community service project. One was for the Linus Project, a national group that provides quilts for seriously ill or traumatized children. "We have donated to the Linus Project, but this year I suggested that we look closer to home," said Linda Taltavull, chairwoman of this year's love project.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2002
Jordon Kitt had always been a man who worked with his hands - as much for creative release as for income. He started by mastering a potter's wheel when he was 12 and grew up to work on a pottery production line in his early 20s; later he built wooden stairs for homes and offices. But in 1992, he was diagnosed with systemic lupus - a strain of the autoimmune disease that often leads to debilitating arthritis - and Kitt knew his tactile pursuits were in jeopardy. But five years ago, after the worst of the joint inflammation and pain had set in, he found an unlikely artistic outlet, one his fingers could handle: Kitt became a quilter.
NEWS
July 2, 2000
Everybody's Quilt Guild of Carroll County recently donated more than 50 mastectomy pillows to The Women's Place at Carroll County General Hospital. The hand-quilted pillows are personalized with inspirational messages and will be used to comfort breast cancer patients who undergo mastectomies at the hospital. Nurses Cheri Fleagle and Alicia Schaeffer accepted the pillows from quilt guild members Diann Paarmann, Pamela Budesheim, Nancy Mosner, Nancy Ogletree, Millie Tracey and Mary Popp.
NEWS
November 22, 2004
Joanne Lois Lee, a longtime registered nurse in the Baltimore area, died of leukemia Wednesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Severn resident was 62. A Baltimore native, the former Joanne Novotny graduated from Southern High School in 1960 and completed nursing school at Sinai Hospital in Baltimore in 1963. She continued her education while working. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1982 from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland and a master's degree from the University of Maryland School of Nursing in 1998.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 20, 2011
Jeanne Ellen Foster, an accomplished needlework teacher and quilter who helped run a family funeral home, died of respiratory failure Monday at the Forest Hill Health and Rehabilitation Center. The Bel Air resident was 79. Born Jeanne Ellen Armstrong in Lancaster, Pa., she was the daughter of Albert Ledmon Armstrong, who headed the paint decorating section in the can factory that produced McCormick spice tins. She was a 1948 graduate of Manheim Township High School and Hood College, where she earned a degree in mathematics.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2009
Last weekend, Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre opened Quilters: The Musical, which celebrates American womanhood as told through the experiences of 19th-century pioneer women. In the current issue of Applause, co-author and composer/lyricist Barbara Damashek describes Quilters "as a theatrical event of the early 1980s, a piece of oral history and feminist musical theater. ... It was one of the earlier explorations in the '80s of the use of oral history and monology as the source for plays."
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2009
Summer in Annapolis officially arrived this weekend with the opening of the musical Smokey Joe's Cafe at the Summer Garden Theatre. The show runs through June 21, and is the first production of the theater's 43rd season of presenting "theater under the stars." Quilters: The Musical takes the stage July 2 to 26, followed by Copacabana from Aug. 6 to Sept. 5. "We're presenting three shows that have never been performed at ASGT," said ASGT president Carolyn Kirby. "We think we have something for everyone this summer.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | June 28, 2007
The quilts of Gee's Bend, Ala., now on view at the Walters Art Museum, have brought national prominence and hope to an isolated rural community once thought of as an artistic backwater. The bold, improvisational quilts have been exhibited around the world, cataloged in books, celebrated in magazines and newspapers, reproduced in licensed merchandise and documented in films, turning the quilters into icons of American art. If You Go Gee's Bend: The Architecture of the Quilt runs through Aug. 26 at the Walters Art Museum, 600 N. Charles St. Call 410-547-9000 or go to thewalters.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | April 11, 2007
Julia L. Blackwood, a fabric artist and designer for more than 30 years, died of pneumonia April 4 at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis. The Davidsonville resident was 56. The former Julia Lampson was born into an artistic family and raised in Hartford, Conn. She was a graduate of the Oxford School in Connecticut and studied art history at Smith College. "As a young person, she was drawn to fabric and made her own clothes," said her husband of 36 years, J. Temple Blackwood, headmaster of Queen Anne School in Upper Marlboro.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
Josephine K. "Jo" Asendorf, a retired secretary and accomplished quilter, died in her sleep Friday at her Ellicott City home. She was 85. Josephine Kane was born in Baltimore and raised on Edmondson Avenue. She was a 1938 graduate of Western High School. She later graduated from Strayer's Business College. Mrs. Asendorf worked briefly for a coffee importer and as an operator for Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. before taking a position during World War II with the Baltimore City Health Department, testing blood in a laboratory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | January 27, 2000
Opening Tuesday at the Dundalk campus of the Community College of Baltimore County is "Images of Black Women," an exhibition of quilts by five fabric artists whose colorful, imaginatively constructed works are inspired by nature, personal experience, philosophical beliefs and family and cultural history. Baltimore quilter Barbara Pietila, who co-curated the show with Janet Waters Bailey, also of Baltimore, says that quilting expresses the artists' "love of all things made of fiber." Other artists represented in the show are Carole Y. Lyles of Columbia, Adrianne M. Sanchez of Baltimore and Sandra Smith of Silver Spring.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 2000
ON FRIDAY morning, Inge Stocklin passed through the main gates of the Patuxent Institution in Jessup. Guards at two security checkpoints counted every pair of scissors in her suitcase. Every Friday since October, Stocklin, Barbara Laskowski and Sandy McDonald -- all members of the Faithful Circle Quilters -- have volunteered at the maximum-security correctional facility to teach quilting to 12 female inmates. "It's always been one of my dreams to do this," Stocklin said. "I go back to the Bible where it says reach out to those in prison."
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | December 16, 2005
Karen Luman's son Jonathan and his wife, Amy, have been waiting three years for their wedding gift. Luman, of Columbia, made the couple a bold red-and-black quilt with 44 fabrics in a complicated pattern of triangles and diamonds. It had thousands of stitches set by hand in lines, hearts and feather patterns. But the quilt was so nice, it ended up traveling to competitions instead of to its intended recipients in St. Louis. After years of quilting for herself, friends and family, Luman has stepped successfully into the world of juried quilt shows.
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