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NEWS
August 9, 1996
Quiet Place co-directors will sponsor a cookoutThe Rev. Franklyn Miller and his wife, Phyllis, co-directors of The Quiet Place, will sponsor two summer events.On Aug. 23, a cookout will be preceded by a discussion beginning at 6: 30 p.m. on "Quiet Intervals Antidote for Busy-ness." Hot dogs, hamburgers and beverages will be provided. Those attending are asked to bring a side dish or dessert.Ladies Day will be held from 9: 30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 28. The subject to be discussed is "Protecting Your Interior Castle."
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NEWS
December 17, 2013
I am an 11 t h -grade student at the Natural Resources Agricultural Sciences magnet school program in Harford County. A common topic of conversation these days with magnet schools is the new bus depot stop program. While many people dislike this program for very good reasons, I enjoy it. I like it because last year I had a bus pickup of 5:30 a.m. This year I leave my house at 6:15 a.m. for the bus pick up at 6:30 a.m. from Fallston High School. I also enjoy getting home at 3 p.m. rather than 3:45 p.m., which is the time I got home last year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jess Blumberg | October 31, 2002
Think lessons of cultural diversity and acceptance are way over a toddler's head? Think again. Barnes & Noble Booksellers and the Anti-Defamation League are co-sponsoring a "Close the Book on Hate Campaign," designed to educate young children (preschoolers to second-graders) about breaking the cycle of prejudice. Initiated after the Columbine High School tragedy, the campaign is in its third year of combating hate. This Saturday, it comes to Ellicott City's Barnes & Noble store. "We use stories to promote tolerance," Sherry L. Elswick, the store's community-relations manager, says of the event.
BUSINESS
By ELIZABETH HEUBECK and ELIZABETH HEUBECK,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 9, 2006
Late one afternoon during a particularly stressful week at work, LaWanda Stone Abernathy did what most office workers only dream of - she stepped away from her desk and into a dimly lit room, kicked back on a futon and fell asleep for a few minutes. "Before I went in there, I was feeling totally overwhelmed," recalled Stone Abernathy, corporate communications manager at Med-IQ, a health care company based in Catonsville. "When I woke up, I was able to complete what I had to do that day. Otherwise, I would have been just spinning my wheels."
NEWS
December 17, 2013
I am an 11 t h -grade student at the Natural Resources Agricultural Sciences magnet school program in Harford County. A common topic of conversation these days with magnet schools is the new bus depot stop program. While many people dislike this program for very good reasons, I enjoy it. I like it because last year I had a bus pickup of 5:30 a.m. This year I leave my house at 6:15 a.m. for the bus pick up at 6:30 a.m. from Fallston High School. I also enjoy getting home at 3 p.m. rather than 3:45 p.m., which is the time I got home last year.
NEWS
By From Sun and baltimoresun.com staff reports | March 3, 2005
Baltimore County police are investigating the fatal shooting of a man whose body was found yesterday morning in a quiet subdivision. A woman found the man's body about 7 a.m. on a grassy right-of-way at Queensberry and Broadbridge roads, police said. The man had been shot once, Officer Shawn Vinson, a county police spokesman, said yesterday. Police today identified the man as Ralph Ihechukwuturu Amadi, 49, of the 100 block of Queensberry Road. Neighbors said he was a native of Nigeria.
FEATURES
By Bob Payne and Bob Payne,Contributing Writer | October 4, 1992
Until a year ago, the attraction of the green, cloud-topped island of Nevis most often cited was that it didn't have the kind of tourist amenities found on so many other Caribbean islands.Its one golf course had only one hole. And its nine small inns -- eight, after Hurricane Hugo just about blew Zetland Plantation off the side of Mount Nevis -- were run by innkeepers who liked to brag that Nevis was not the place to come for people who expected cable television or air conditioning or 24-hour room service.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | December 17, 2000
IT IS ALMOST Christmas, and I am looking for a quiet place. I know I won't find it in the mall or on the roads. Only a fool would look for peace and quiet there. Not in my kitchen, either. And I don't even bake. And not in the secret place where I hide all my gifts. There is no peace and quiet there. Just snips of ribbon and empty rolls of tape. No, I am looking for a quiet place inside my mind. And I'm not having any luck finding one there, either. There doesn't seem to be even a small corner to which I can retreat during this hectic and poignant time of year.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 2003
Bill Murrow speaks in a slow and melodious voice, his words full of adjectives for the high-end antiques showcased in his renovated barn on Main Street, Fawn Grove, Pa. On his scenic 14 acres sit the Victorian house and barn where Murrow and his wife, Karen, have room for antiques, mo-peds, glassware, and goats, chickens and guinea birds. Murrow, 46, drove by the house for years while he did business selling antiques at a shop in Ellicott City. He finally bought it for his wife and son, Grant, now 9. This is the place where his collections and farming coexist, while Karen Murrow teaches school and Grant does his homework.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | November 9, 1990
Not everybody is into the high-velocity conversations and dance floor moves at Warfields, but those who want an alternative to that club's bright neon and happy noise need not even leave the Sheraton Towson.Only a glass hotel wall separates Warfields from its more sedate sister club, Carnegie's Lounge (a k a the Lobby Bar)."We have an older, more business-type crowd at Carnegie's than at Warfields," says bar manager Lisa Dow. "We're quieter and so it's easy to hold a conversation here."Although not named for anybody in particular, it doesn't hurt that Carnegie's Lounge may remind you of the business acumen of Andrew Carnegie.
NEWS
By From Sun and baltimoresun.com staff reports | March 3, 2005
Baltimore County police are investigating the fatal shooting of a man whose body was found yesterday morning in a quiet subdivision. A woman found the man's body about 7 a.m. on a grassy right-of-way at Queensberry and Broadbridge roads, police said. The man had been shot once, Officer Shawn Vinson, a county police spokesman, said yesterday. Police today identified the man as Ralph Ihechukwuturu Amadi, 49, of the 100 block of Queensberry Road. Neighbors said he was a native of Nigeria.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 2003
Bill Murrow speaks in a slow and melodious voice, his words full of adjectives for the high-end antiques showcased in his renovated barn on Main Street, Fawn Grove, Pa. On his scenic 14 acres sit the Victorian house and barn where Murrow and his wife, Karen, have room for antiques, mo-peds, glassware, and goats, chickens and guinea birds. Murrow, 46, drove by the house for years while he did business selling antiques at a shop in Ellicott City. He finally bought it for his wife and son, Grant, now 9. This is the place where his collections and farming coexist, while Karen Murrow teaches school and Grant does his homework.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jess Blumberg | October 31, 2002
Think lessons of cultural diversity and acceptance are way over a toddler's head? Think again. Barnes & Noble Booksellers and the Anti-Defamation League are co-sponsoring a "Close the Book on Hate Campaign," designed to educate young children (preschoolers to second-graders) about breaking the cycle of prejudice. Initiated after the Columbine High School tragedy, the campaign is in its third year of combating hate. This Saturday, it comes to Ellicott City's Barnes & Noble store. "We use stories to promote tolerance," Sherry L. Elswick, the store's community-relations manager, says of the event.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | December 17, 2000
IT IS ALMOST Christmas, and I am looking for a quiet place. I know I won't find it in the mall or on the roads. Only a fool would look for peace and quiet there. Not in my kitchen, either. And I don't even bake. And not in the secret place where I hide all my gifts. There is no peace and quiet there. Just snips of ribbon and empty rolls of tape. No, I am looking for a quiet place inside my mind. And I'm not having any luck finding one there, either. There doesn't seem to be even a small corner to which I can retreat during this hectic and poignant time of year.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 24, 1999
MEGIDDO, Israel -- If the year 2000 brings the feared "end of days," surely Armageddon could expect some action. But from outward signs, this promises to be one of the most tranquil spots in the country, if not the world, as the new year arrives.Elsewhere in the Holy Land, police are bracing for a particularly bad night. For months, they have been scouting for disturbed Christians who might be tempted to commit mass suicide in hopes of hastening the day of judgment.In the often tense Old City of Jerusalem, authorities will be on extra alert for terrorism and for a crowd control headache as Christian pilgrims converge with an expected 400,000 Muslim worshipers marking the end of the sacred month of Ramadan.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
WASHINGTON -- On the afternoon after, the Panda House at the National Zoo was stone-cold silent and empty. The last of the zoo's two celebrity pandas, Hsing-Hsing, had been put out of his pain Sunday by lethal injection, by zoo keepers who knew they could not keep the creature one more day.The skin and skeleton of the 28-year-old panda will be on display early next year in the rotunda of the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. The panda's tissue and organs will remain at the zoo for study.
BUSINESS
By ELIZABETH HEUBECK and ELIZABETH HEUBECK,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 9, 2006
Late one afternoon during a particularly stressful week at work, LaWanda Stone Abernathy did what most office workers only dream of - she stepped away from her desk and into a dimly lit room, kicked back on a futon and fell asleep for a few minutes. "Before I went in there, I was feeling totally overwhelmed," recalled Stone Abernathy, corporate communications manager at Med-IQ, a health care company based in Catonsville. "When I woke up, I was able to complete what I had to do that day. Otherwise, I would have been just spinning my wheels."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 24, 1999
MEGIDDO, Israel -- If the year 2000 brings the feared "end of days," surely Armageddon could expect some action. But from outward signs, this promises to be one of the most tranquil spots in the country, if not the world, as the new year arrives.Elsewhere in the Holy Land, police are bracing for a particularly bad night. For months, they have been scouting for disturbed Christians who might be tempted to commit mass suicide in hopes of hastening the day of judgment.In the often tense Old City of Jerusalem, authorities will be on extra alert for terrorism and for a crowd control headache as Christian pilgrims converge with an expected 400,000 Muslim worshipers marking the end of the sacred month of Ramadan.
BUSINESS
By Bob Graham and Bob Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 1998
Eleven years ago today, Chase, a small, insular community near the water in eastern Baltimore County, was thrust into the national spotlight when an Amtrak train crashed into three Conrail locomotives, killing 16 people and injuring 170 others.According to Realtors in the area, those who came as curiosity seekers found a close-knit community conveniently located near Interstate 95, Route 40 and Eastern Avenue.Residents on that day took crash survivors into their homes, fed and comforted them and let them make long-distance calls to their families anywhere.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1997
Baltimore County's newest park has an unusual but inspiring message: "Cancer -- There is hope."The 1-acre parcel at Goucher Boulevard and Fairmount Avenue in Towson will be dedicated today, with life-size bronze sculptures, a cascading waterfall, a computerized registry of cancer survivors and a "Positive Mental Attitude Walk."The 10 a.m. ceremony for the Richard and Annette Bloch Cancer Survivors Park will feature its largest benefactor, Richard A. Bloch, co-founder of H&R Block and a cancer survivor.
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