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NEWS
By Margaret Benner | June 6, 2012
There won't be a big news story about Gregory Seagle's death. And that's a shame, because if there was ever anyone on this planet who deserved to be publicly remembered for how he lived, it was Greg, who died last week from cancer at 61. Greg was a writer and a teacher. It's hard to say which undertaking he liked better; it's easy to say how talented he was at both. But actually, the two careers were intertwined because Greg taught writing. He was an adjunct and then a lecturer at Towson University, with few benefits and little job security.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Like other editors, I lead a quiet life, making the daily round from home to paragraph factory and back. Excitement is something I encounter at a remove. So it was from I tweet that I discovered that there is a raging hubbub about literally , including some heavy breathing at Buzzfeed , where someone has been reading the dictionary.  An article by Jessica Misener, "The Wrong Definition Of 'Literally' Is Literally Going In The Dictionary,"  is aghast that those craven lexicographers are listing literally  is used for humorous or emphatic effect, meaning not literally but figuratively.  Well, chill.  Would you think, if someone said, "I was so angry my head literally exploded," that it was time to hire someone to steam the bone fragments and tissue spatter from the wallpaper?
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MOBILE
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2011
July 22, 2011 He was 49 and on his way to political greatness. She was 22 and picketing City Hall mostly for the fun of it. It took hot pants to bring them together. Paired with white go-go boots and Jeanne Bell's lithe young physique, the red short-shorts caught the eye of William Donald Schaefer as he strode past protesters outside City Hall. He looked her up and down, said he'd like her on his mayoral campaign, gave her his phone number with instructions to call, and walked off. "Who was he?"
NEWS
By Margaret Benner | June 6, 2012
There won't be a big news story about Gregory Seagle's death. And that's a shame, because if there was ever anyone on this planet who deserved to be publicly remembered for how he lived, it was Greg, who died last week from cancer at 61. Greg was a writer and a teacher. It's hard to say which undertaking he liked better; it's easy to say how talented he was at both. But actually, the two careers were intertwined because Greg taught writing. He was an adjunct and then a lecturer at Towson University, with few benefits and little job security.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 29, 2010
Agathe von Trapp, the eldest daughter of the von Trapp family made famous in "The Sound of Music," who took exception to the way her father was portrayed, died of congestive heart failure Tuesday at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 97 and lived in Brooklandville. "She had been rabidly negative about the musical and film," said her physician, Dr. Janet Horn, who with her husband financed the publication of 3,000 copies of Miss von Trapp's memoir, which she wrote to set the record straight about her family's exploits.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2003
One morning in 1962, Lee Bonner and friend Phil Huth sat in the cool basement of a Towson rowhouse and penned a song. There was no particular inspiration, no shadows of Jack Kerouac or Bob Dylan. They were just playing and singing about teen-age love in their local band, the Lafayettes, named after the Baltimore avenue. The group won a battle of the bands contest on the Buddy Deane Show, and their lives suddenly were great fun. The song, "Life's Too Short" became a national hit on the RCA label and turned group members into celebrities.
NEWS
November 5, 1990
Yisrael Levy, 64, an underground fighter in Israel's struggle for independence who carried out the 1946 bombing of a Jerusalem hotel that killed 91 people, died Friday. The cause of death was not given. Mr. Levy belonged to Irgun Zvai Leumi, the militant Jewish underground led by Menachem Begin that fought the British for independence in the 1940s. Its deadliest operation was the bombing of the King David Hotel, a luxury six-story establishment that housed the British Government Secretariat and army headquarters.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 10, 1994
HILLSIDE, N.J. -- Frank Balun lived a quiet life -- except for a stint as a B-25 gunner in World War II -- until the day last month when he trapped and killed the rat that was the prime suspect in raiding his little tomato patch here.For that crime, he was told, he could be sent to jail for six months and fined up to $1,250.Outrageous, public opinion said. Outrageous, public officials said as they rallied around the quiet 69-year-old grandfather.Yesterday the chief law-enforcement officer of Union County, Prosecutor Andrew K. Ruotolo Jr., told Hillside municipal prosecutor Christopher M. Howard to drop all charges against Mr. Balun, in effect absolving him of any wrongdoing.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Like other editors, I lead a quiet life, making the daily round from home to paragraph factory and back. Excitement is something I encounter at a remove. So it was from I tweet that I discovered that there is a raging hubbub about literally , including some heavy breathing at Buzzfeed , where someone has been reading the dictionary.  An article by Jessica Misener, "The Wrong Definition Of 'Literally' Is Literally Going In The Dictionary,"  is aghast that those craven lexicographers are listing literally  is used for humorous or emphatic effect, meaning not literally but figuratively.  Well, chill.  Would you think, if someone said, "I was so angry my head literally exploded," that it was time to hire someone to steam the bone fragments and tissue spatter from the wallpaper?
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman | March 6, 1997
Memo to President Clinton: Forget the commission on cloning. What you really need is one on punning.Send in the clones. Send in the clone puns. In less than two weeks, Dolly, that DNA marvel of a sheep, has been the subject of more "Hello, Dolly" puns than the Dalai Lama has managed to accumulate in 20 years.According to a search of the major newspapers database maintained by Nexis, "Hello, Dolly" has appeared in print at least 50 times since Feb. 24. (And that didn't include the headline on Page 1 of yesterday's Washington Post, "Hello Dolly, Goodbye to One Man's Quiet Life."
MOBILE
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2011
July 22, 2011 He was 49 and on his way to political greatness. She was 22 and picketing City Hall mostly for the fun of it. It took hot pants to bring them together. Paired with white go-go boots and Jeanne Bell's lithe young physique, the red short-shorts caught the eye of William Donald Schaefer as he strode past protesters outside City Hall. He looked her up and down, said he'd like her on his mayoral campaign, gave her his phone number with instructions to call, and walked off. "Who was he?"
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 29, 2010
Agathe von Trapp, the eldest daughter of the von Trapp family made famous in "The Sound of Music," who took exception to the way her father was portrayed, died of congestive heart failure Tuesday at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 97 and lived in Brooklandville. "She had been rabidly negative about the musical and film," said her physician, Dr. Janet Horn, who with her husband financed the publication of 3,000 copies of Miss von Trapp's memoir, which she wrote to set the record straight about her family's exploits.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2010
Once the Queen of Baltimore burlesque, Fannie Belle Fleming — better known as Blaze Starr — has been living the quiet life in rural West Virginia for more than 30 years now, far away from the blinking neon signs, barkers and strippers of The Block. The Block was her venue, where she reigned supreme for more than 20 years. She is still fondly remembered by generations of gents, sans wife or girlfriend, traveling salesmen and servicemen all out for a night on the town, and for the rose petals that she gently blew across her ample bosom to admiring audiences from the runway of her Two O'Clock Club.
NEWS
By JOEL RUBIN and JOEL RUBIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 20, 2006
BANGKOK, Thailand -- The mystery of John Mark Karr grows as he awaits his extradition to the United States in connection with the killing of JonBenet Ramsey. Some details have emerged, however, of the life he had cobbled together in this frenetic city. Like hundreds of other foreigners who reside in or pass through Bangkok every year, Karr, 41, taught students eager to learn English. This spring, one of Thailand's most prestigious private schools, the Bangkok Christian College, posted online and in the city's English-language newspaper an ad for a teaching position in its English immersion program.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 26, 2006
I finally met Nikolai Volkoff, the bad-guy pro wrestler from the days of Bruno Sammartino and Gorilla Monsoon - and I don't know how we hated this man so much. Volkoff is lovable, gentle, charming and modest. He doesn't snarl anymore. The man doesn't even eat red meat. Last Thursday, Volkoff walked into the basement dining room of The Barn, on Harford Road in Carney, wearing large, old-guy glasses, a bright red jacket and Russian soldier's cap, and he sang the Soviet anthem. And no one threw any food at him. Amazing.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
A few months ago, Roy Chapman was a semi-obscure, semi-retired septuagenarian who owned a semi-promising racehorse named Smarty Jones. Now, Chapman - not to mention his horse - is on the brink of making history. If Smarty Jones can finish off his amazing run that began two weeks ago at Churchill Downs and continued yesterday at Pimlico Race Course with a Triple Crown-clinching victory next month at Belmont Park, he and his wife, Patricia, would become the richest owners in the sport's history.
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