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By Los Angeles Times | October 24, 1990
NEW YORK -- An international selection committee that is determining the remaining five starters has ruled against Quiet American being in the field for the Breeders' Cup Classic at Belmont Park on Saturday. Trainer Gary Jones' 4-year-old colt didn't have enough points to earn one of the first nine spots.Quiet American has won only once in five starts this year, but has beaten Bayakoa and finished second to Dispersal in the Woodward Handicap at Belmont on Sept. 15.
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2010
Except for the retired Gene Hackman and the still-going-strong Samuel L. Jackson, no other actor has sustained as busy and diverse a career as Michael Caine. Almost from the beginning, he pulled off the feat of being an identifiable star -- his name alone evokes a Cockney zest -- and a character actor capable of anything. Here's my pick of the best Caine performances from the score of them on view at the AFI-Silver's series, "Michael Caine: A Class Act," in order of their festival appearance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 9, 2003
No great writer knew more about movies than Graham Greene. In the 1930s he penned inspired film criticism, and in the 1940s he wrote two classic scripts for director Carol Reed: The Fallen Idol (1948) and The Third Man (1949). Of the dozens of movies adapted by others from Greene's novels and stories, Australian director Phillip Noyce's The Quiet American ranks with the best. Greene himself would have applauded. Michael Caine gives the performance of a lifetime in this potent tale of political and spiritual betrayal in 1952 Vietnam.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 14, 2003
Graham Greene's beloved Henry James judged fiction according to its quota of "felt life." In Phillip Noyce's movie of Greene's 1955 novel The Quiet American, Michael Caine takes that concept one step further. As a British journalist named Thomas Fowler in 1952 Vietnam, he not only expresses felt life, but the parts of Fowler's life that the man has ceased to feel. He conveys sardonic wisdom, a warm, erotic knowingness, and the absence of any bedrock commitment beyond the integrity of his byline.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 14, 2003
What Citizen Kane was to movie lovers in 1941, The Wild Bunch was to cineastes in 1969. Its adrenaline rush of revelations seemed to explode the parameters of the screen. The director and the co-writer, Sam Peckinpah, turned the last stand of the Hole-in the-Wall Gang into a wrenching piece of early 20th-century mythology. His filmmaking both evinced and catalyzed complex feelings about the outlaws' freedom, brotherhood and professionalism, their manliness and childishness, and the way they experienced the closing of the West as Purgatory and used Latin America as an escape hatch.
NEWS
August 2, 1997
John H. Ware III,88, a well-known Pennsylvania businessman and former state senator and congressman, died Tuesday in Lancaster, Pa.After serving for 10 years in the state senate, Ware won a seat in the U.S. House in 1970 and represented the Ninth Congressional District for two terms before retiring in 1975.Ware, a Republican, founded the Penn Fuel Gas Co., and led the firm as president for 45 years before retiring.Bao Dai,83, Vietnam's last emperor, a symbolic ruler and puppet of the French colonial regime, died Thursday in a military hospital in Paris after spending four decades in exile in France.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 14, 2003
Graham Greene's beloved Henry James judged fiction according to its quota of "felt life." In Phillip Noyce's movie of Greene's 1955 novel The Quiet American, Michael Caine takes that concept one step further. As a British journalist named Thomas Fowler in 1952 Vietnam, he not only expresses felt life, but the parts of Fowler's life that the man has ceased to feel. He conveys sardonic wisdom, a warm, erotic knowingness, and the absence of any bedrock commitment beyond the integrity of his byline.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 8, 1991
Paris. -- When I was very young, and much surer of myself, I was quite put out by the anti-Americanism of Graham Greene's ''The Quiet American.'' I wrote a notice of the book (which came out in the United States in 1956), saying that Americans were not as stupid as Greene made us out to be, and that after the hash the French had made of their Indochina war the United States -- which by then had made itself responsible for the new South Vietnamese government of Ngo Dinh Diem -- could scarcely do worse.
NEWS
By Eric A. Weinberger | December 24, 2001
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - One wonders how many people, when they heard of the death of a young CIA officer in a prison revolt in Afghanistan, then saw his blunt-jawed photograph in their newspaper, thought of Pyle from The Quiet American, Graham Greene's novel of Vietnam in the 1950s, before the deluge. Pyle too was a company man, and earnest; "with his crew-cut and his wide campus gaze, he seemed incapable of harm." One is speculating, of course, about Johnny Michael Spann, 32, of Winfield, Ala., who might well have been tougher and more seasoned and not so easily led or out of his depth as poor, murdered Pyle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2010
Except for the retired Gene Hackman and the still-going-strong Samuel L. Jackson, no other actor has sustained as busy and diverse a career as Michael Caine. Almost from the beginning, he pulled off the feat of being an identifiable star -- his name alone evokes a Cockney zest -- and a character actor capable of anything. Here's my pick of the best Caine performances from the score of them on view at the AFI-Silver's series, "Michael Caine: A Class Act," in order of their festival appearance.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 14, 2003
What Citizen Kane was to movie lovers in 1941, The Wild Bunch was to cineastes in 1969. Its adrenaline rush of revelations seemed to explode the parameters of the screen. The director and the co-writer, Sam Peckinpah, turned the last stand of the Hole-in the-Wall Gang into a wrenching piece of early 20th-century mythology. His filmmaking both evinced and catalyzed complex feelings about the outlaws' freedom, brotherhood and professionalism, their manliness and childishness, and the way they experienced the closing of the West as Purgatory and used Latin America as an escape hatch.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 10, 2003
Don't expect much in the way of surprises when the Oscar nominees are announced tomorrow morning. Most of the favorites have become pretty clear, if only because they're the ones that have been raking in all the other awards for the past several weeks. So, expect to hear the titles Chicago, The Hours and Gangs of New York a lot - which is fine, they're among the best films to come out of Hollywood during the past year, the ones members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will think of when they mark their ballots.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 9, 2003
No great writer knew more about movies than Graham Greene. In the 1930s he penned inspired film criticism, and in the 1940s he wrote two classic scripts for director Carol Reed: The Fallen Idol (1948) and The Third Man (1949). Of the dozens of movies adapted by others from Greene's novels and stories, Australian director Phillip Noyce's The Quiet American ranks with the best. Greene himself would have applauded. Michael Caine gives the performance of a lifetime in this potent tale of political and spiritual betrayal in 1952 Vietnam.
NEWS
By Eric A. Weinberger | December 24, 2001
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - One wonders how many people, when they heard of the death of a young CIA officer in a prison revolt in Afghanistan, then saw his blunt-jawed photograph in their newspaper, thought of Pyle from The Quiet American, Graham Greene's novel of Vietnam in the 1950s, before the deluge. Pyle too was a company man, and earnest; "with his crew-cut and his wide campus gaze, he seemed incapable of harm." One is speculating, of course, about Johnny Michael Spann, 32, of Winfield, Ala., who might well have been tougher and more seasoned and not so easily led or out of his depth as poor, murdered Pyle.
NEWS
August 2, 1997
John H. Ware III,88, a well-known Pennsylvania businessman and former state senator and congressman, died Tuesday in Lancaster, Pa.After serving for 10 years in the state senate, Ware won a seat in the U.S. House in 1970 and represented the Ninth Congressional District for two terms before retiring in 1975.Ware, a Republican, founded the Penn Fuel Gas Co., and led the firm as president for 45 years before retiring.Bao Dai,83, Vietnam's last emperor, a symbolic ruler and puppet of the French colonial regime, died Thursday in a military hospital in Paris after spending four decades in exile in France.
NEWS
By David Lamb and David Lamb,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 22, 1997
HANOI, Vietnam -- Even now, in the dreary days of winter, Hanoi moves with a sense of purpose: This is the springtime of the city's renaissance, and you can almost taste the commerce in the air.Nothing and no one is idle. Along the banks of downtown lakes, residents by the thousands gather before sunrise to exercise, and by breakfast time the streets are filling with bicycles and the symbol of the emerging middle class -- Honda Super Cub scooters -- moving in free-form chaos.From shoeshine boys who hawk copies of Graham Greene's "The Quiet American" -- a prophetic 1954 novel about the perils of foreign involvement in Vietnam -- to shopkeepers on Hai Ba Trung Street, whose TVs and appliances are piled ceiling-high, to entrepreneurs with cellular phones at the Metropole Hotel, Hanoi is caught up in the giddy expectations of opportunity created by the introduction of a free-market economy and the end of the U.S. trade embargo.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 10, 2003
Don't expect much in the way of surprises when the Oscar nominees are announced tomorrow morning. Most of the favorites have become pretty clear, if only because they're the ones that have been raking in all the other awards for the past several weeks. So, expect to hear the titles Chicago, The Hours and Gangs of New York a lot - which is fine, they're among the best films to come out of Hollywood during the past year, the ones members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will think of when they mark their ballots.
NEWS
By David Lamb and David Lamb,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 22, 1997
HANOI, Vietnam -- Even now, in the dreary days of winter, Hanoi moves with a sense of purpose: This is the springtime of the city's renaissance, and you can almost taste the commerce in the air.Nothing and no one is idle. Along the banks of downtown lakes, residents by the thousands gather before sunrise to exercise, and by breakfast time the streets are filling with bicycles and the symbol of the emerging middle class -- Honda Super Cub scooters -- moving in free-form chaos.From shoeshine boys who hawk copies of Graham Greene's "The Quiet American" -- a prophetic 1954 novel about the perils of foreign involvement in Vietnam -- to shopkeepers on Hai Ba Trung Street, whose TVs and appliances are piled ceiling-high, to entrepreneurs with cellular phones at the Metropole Hotel, Hanoi is caught up in the giddy expectations of opportunity created by the introduction of a free-market economy and the end of the U.S. trade embargo.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 8, 1991
Paris. -- When I was very young, and much surer of myself, I was quite put out by the anti-Americanism of Graham Greene's ''The Quiet American.'' I wrote a notice of the book (which came out in the United States in 1956), saying that Americans were not as stupid as Greene made us out to be, and that after the hash the French had made of their Indochina war the United States -- which by then had made itself responsible for the new South Vietnamese government of Ngo Dinh Diem -- could scarcely do worse.
SPORTS
By Los Angeles Times | October 24, 1990
NEW YORK -- An international selection committee that is determining the remaining five starters has ruled against Quiet American being in the field for the Breeders' Cup Classic at Belmont Park on Saturday. Trainer Gary Jones' 4-year-old colt didn't have enough points to earn one of the first nine spots.Quiet American has won only once in five starts this year, but has beaten Bayakoa and finished second to Dispersal in the Woodward Handicap at Belmont on Sept. 15.
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