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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 22, 2003
What makes a DLL file suddenly disappear, leaving one with a foreboding message during a bootup like "A required .DLL file, MRTRATE.DLL, was not found"? Should I care? On the surface of things, everything still seems to be working. What's it for, why did it leave, and how do I retrieve it if it's truly important? Dynamic link libraries, or DLLs, are small bits of code that handle repetitive tasks and other housekeeping. That MRTRATE.DLL error is caused by the popular Quicken personal-finance program conflicting with other parts of Windows designed to handle scheduling.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
BETHESDA -- As David Feherty walked up the fourth fairway Sunday following third-round leader Patrick Reed to a tee shot that landed in the right rough, the CBS golf analyst said to a reporter doing the same: “Congressional [Country Club] finally got the course like they wanted it for the U.S. Open.” Three years after Rory McIlroy's performance caused shock waves throughout both the golf world and the club itself, the venerable Blue Course finally took its revenge in the Quicken Loans National.
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SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | November 30, 1992
The Christmas family knew it was onto "a good thing."It seemed everyone from great-aunt Helen Stevens to 9-month-old Grant Cassidy was at the races yesterday to see the Donelson Christmas family homebred gelding, Quicken, win the$40,000 Orme Wilson Jr. Memorial Stakes.Corrine Christmas Sullivan said in the paddock beforehand that she was nervous."I don't know what's worse, having a horse that can't run or having a horse that you think has some ability and then hoping he lives up to expectations," she said.
SPORTS
Sports on TV | June 28, 2014
SATURDAY'S TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS AFL Pittsburgh@Jacksonville CBSSN7 Philadelphia@Iowa TCN8 Spokane@Los Angeles ESPN210 NASCAR Quaker State 400 TNT7:30 IndyCar Grand Prix/Houston, race 1 NBCSN3 MLB Washington@Cubs MASN, WGN-A1 White Sox@Toronto MLB1 Minnesota@Texas FS14 Tampa Bay@Orioles MASN24 Boston@Yankees 457 ...
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 14, 2002
I have only three employees in my shop, which sells low-cost merchandise in small lots to many customers. What kind of computer software should I be looking for to handle my receivables, payables, payroll, inventory and taxes? Your business sounds like it is the right size to computerize simply by buying the small-business upgrade of the super-popular Quicken sold to ordinary folks for their personal finances. It costs $79 and is called Quicken Premier 2003 for Home and Business. When Quicken executives gave me a dog-and-pony show for this software, I was amazed to see that the same software that can let you bank online from home comes with modules covering every item you said you needed.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | September 30, 1991
The Microsoft Corp. has come up with three new Windows products for people who have powerful personal computers, but who do not need all the power of conventional Windows business software.It sounds like a narrow field, but it really is not. Computer prices are coming down as fast as computer technology is advancing, with the result that many beginning computer users today are starting out with machines that have the minimum requirements to run Windows software: a 386SX microprocessor, a few megabytes of system memory and at least 40 megabytes of hard disk drive storage.
BUSINESS
By PETER McWILLIAMS | December 12, 1990
This time of year I'm inundated with software or literature about software. Manufacturers, naturally, know people are on the prowl for gifts. And there are also plenty of people boxed in for the winter who are looking to improve their computer systems. Here are some of the more intriguing pieces I've found.BDL HOMEWARE. Bette Laswell, president of BDL Homeware, sent me some of her programs she describes as "ready to use -- you don't have to figure out how to customize it." Her programs, for IBM compatibles, are for home-based needs.
SPORTS
Sports on TV | June 28, 2014
SATURDAY'S TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS AFL Pittsburgh@Jacksonville CBSSN7 Philadelphia@Iowa TCN8 Spokane@Los Angeles ESPN210 NASCAR Quaker State 400 TNT7:30 IndyCar Grand Prix/Houston, race 1 NBCSN3 MLB Washington@Cubs MASN, WGN-A1 White Sox@Toronto MLB1 Minnesota@Texas FS14 Tampa Bay@Orioles MASN24 Boston@Yankees 457 ...
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 14, 1994
SAN FRANCISCO -- Microsoft Corp., in the software industry's largest acquisition ever, agreed yesterday to acquire Intuit Inc., the producer of the leading personal finance program, in a stock swap valued at about $1.5 billion.For Microsoft, the world's largest software company, the ownership of the Quicken program would put the company in a position to dominate the emerging market for writing checks, paying bills and shopping electronically from home.Quicken, with 6 million users, is already the leader by far in financial software for personal computers, and is used by a few small banks in the United States as the means for letting their customers do their banking from home.
BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz and Humberto Cruz,Tribune media Services | October 8, 2006
The letter from the insurance company said an inspector would come to look over the house. He did a pretty thorough job, checking the roof and foundation, the sides of the house, gutters and driveway. He found everything in order - no rotting wood surfaces or peeling paint, no cracking or crumbling of foundation walls, no water stains, mildew or mold. I was feeling pretty smug because, by acing this free "home-care review," my homeowner's insurance premium would stay reasonably low. (If the inspection had turned up a problem and I fixed it in a timely manner, the premium wouldn't go up. Check whether your insurance company offers this inspection service.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
- Oliver Goss came to Congressional Country Club earlier this week looking to play in his second PGA Tour event at the Quicken Loans National. As things have transpired for the 20-year-old Australian, the hardest part was getting in the clubhouse door. "I don't have a PGA Tour credential because I'm not a member and they said, 'No, we can't let you in,'" Goss said Friday. "So I had to walk all the way around and go back in [another entrance] It's no big deal and I have a credential now. " Goss has more than that.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
BETHESDA -  Before Tiger Woods committed last week to playing in the Quicken Loans National, many figured that Congressional Country Club would look and feel very much like it did last year, when the absence of the world's former No. 1 player offered plenty of elbow room. It could be that way again this weekend. The crowds and major-championship buzz that followed the game's biggest draw through the first two rounds likely will disappear now that Woods, looking older than 38 and trying to find his game after being sidelined more than three months after back surgery, has missed the cut. Coming into Friday's second round at 3-over-par, mostly the result of poor first-round putting, Woods struggled in all facets of his game, shooting a 4-over 75. His two-day total of 7-over-par 149 was 13 shots off the lead and four strokes off the cut line.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Tiger Woods has long been known for wearing red and black on Sunday, his wardrobe of choice for nearly all of his 79 victories on the PGA Tour. When the 38-year-old tees off Thursday for the first time in a tour event in more than three months, Woods and the rest of the field will be thinking about how much rust he will be wearing. The atmosphere for his practice round Wednesday at Congressional Country Club during the pro-am for the Quicken Loans National was reminiscent of when he played here in the 1997 U.S. Open a couple of months after winning the Masters by a dozen shots.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
BETHESDA - Like the superstar athletes who befriended and mentored him early in his career as he watched them grow old, Tiger Woods keeps staring at his own golfing mortality. Coming off a three-month layoff following back surgery, Woods returns to the PGA Tour this week for the Quicken Loans National at Congressional Country Club with a bit of a different game than the one he has played for the past 18 years as a pro. “Just like M.J., I've got the fadeaway,” Woods said, referring to one of his longtime confidants, Michael Jordan.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - A National Labor Relations Board official's decision that Northwestern's scholarship football players can vote to unionize is likely to accelerate the pace of NCAA reforms and "change the landscape" of college athletics, Maryland coach Randy Edsall said Thursday. "I think there are issues that we do have that need to be addressed," Edsall told reporters after practice. "With that ruling, I would think there are going to be some things that would change in terms of the structure.
NEWS
By Maeve Reston, Seema Mehta and Michael Finnegan and Maeve Reston, Seema Mehta and Michael Finnegan,Los Angeles Times | October 31, 2008
DEFIANCE, Ohio - Spurred by the latest statistics that confirm the rocky state of the economy, Democrat Barack Obama and Republican John McCain exhorted their supporters yesterday to intensify their efforts as the marathon presidential race turns into a sprint to the finish line. With five days before Election Day, the candidates stepped up their schedules, adding stops and rallies as they traveled to more battleground states. Throughout, the focus was on the economy, the issue that has dominated the last weeks of the campaign, and on the importance of voting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | November 27, 2000
Originally, the Start button and icons for Microsoft Windows were at the bottom of the monitor screen. All of a sudden I realized they had shifted to the right-hand edge of the screen, and I cannot find the key to return them to the screen bottom. There is no key. The mouse moves the task bar in Windows from the bottom to either side or the top. To move the bar, you put the cursor in a spot on the bar without icons and, while holding down the left mouse button, use a sweeping motion to move the whole thing to a different edge of the desktop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | May 8, 2000
Originally, my Windows Start button and icons were at the bottom of my monitor screen. All of a sudden I realized they had shifted to the right-hand edge of the screen, and I cannot find the key to return them to the screen bottom. It isn't a key, but the mouse that moves the task bar in Windows from the bottom to either side or the top. To move the bar, put the cursor in a spot on the bar without icons and, while holding down the left mouse button, use a sweeping motion to move the whole thing to a different edge of the desktop.
BUSINESS
By The Wall Street Journal | April 30, 2008
Airfares are on the rise as airlines keep a tighter rein on flights and seats - and that rise could accelerate if industry merger efforts bear fruit. The average cost of airline tickets in the United States was up 10.2 percent last month compared with a year ago, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as airlines struggle with surging fuel prices and a softening U.S. economy. Over the same period, overall inflation rose 4 percent. Already this year, most of the more than a dozen price-increase attempts have been matched by rivals.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | November 27, 2007
It's the time of year to start thinking about New Year's resolutions and, if you're like many of us, dieting and budgeting will make your list. Neither word conjures up fun. And even with the best of intentions behind them, both resolutions stand a good chance of being broken before too long. Keeping to a budget and sticking to it might become more important, though. Sure, we've gone through worse economic times without having to change our spending. But the days of easy credit appear to be over.
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