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By Linda Cicero and Linda Cicero,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | January 30, 1991
Quiche kind of disappeared from our consciousness after to much exposure in the late '70s, coupled with dire warnings from the cholesterol cops in the '80s, placed it on the "What's Out" lists.But this quiche is so quick and easy that its a true comeback contender in the '90s.1! Italian Zucchini Crescent Pie4 cups thinly sliced, unpeeled zucchini1 cup coarsely chopped onion1/2 cup margarine or butter1/2 cup chopped parsley or 2 tablespoons parsley flakes1/2 teaspoon salt1/2 teaspoon black pepper1/2 teaspoon garlic powder1/4 teaspoon basil leaves1/4 teaspoon oregano leaves2 eggs, well beaten8 ounces (2 cups)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
William Maughlin and "Downtown" Kevin Brown want you to have a good time and good food in Station North , a community they love. The duo behind the much-adored Station North Arts Cafe Gallery are following up that success with a second restaurant, Nancy by SNAC (as in Station North Arts Cafe), which opened last fall. Plans for a third Station North spot, a barbecue joint, are already in the works. Nancy is named for Nancy Haragan , the late founder of the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance . Given the arts connection, its location - within the Maryland Institute College of Art Graduate Studio Center on North Avenue - is an appropriate one. Nancy by SNAC is open for breakfast, lunch and snacks every weekday but for dinner only on Fridays.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
Well, the quinoa salad was a hit at the garden party. I think. At least the bowl ended up empty, which is great because my refrigerator is stuffed with greens and with leftovers. One thing I realized today: I can keep up with making a dish every day (maybe) but usually there are also leftovers, too. My husband was heading out the door to work out today and mentioned that he might "grab something for lunch" and I told him that really, that might not be okay today -- or for the rest of the summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
Well, the quinoa salad was a hit at the garden party. I think. At least the bowl ended up empty, which is great because my refrigerator is stuffed with greens and with leftovers. One thing I realized today: I can keep up with making a dish every day (maybe) but usually there are also leftovers, too. My husband was heading out the door to work out today and mentioned that he might "grab something for lunch" and I told him that really, that might not be okay today -- or for the rest of the summer.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | June 13, 1999
From elitist French fare to kitsch cuisine to standard deli food, quiche seems finally to have found a permanent niche on the U.S. culinary scene.In its most ancient form, quiche (from "kuchen," German for "little cake") was a savory pie with a bread base. Contemporary quiches have shells of pastry or phyllo (some are crustless) and imaginative fillings with cheese, vegetables, seafood or vegetarian combinations.Butter-braised leeks and a hint of mustard flavor this cheese quiche.Leek-Gruyere QuicheServes 63 large leeks, trimmed and cleaned2 tablespoons butterEgg Pastry for Quiche, unbaked (recipe below)
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | June 15, 1994
A cookie and a quiche take top billing in taste. Joan Bourquin of Severna Park requested a recipe for Copper Mountain Quiche, which, she notes, "appeared in the Sun Magazine years ago."Susan Forsberg of Baltimore and Claire Albert of Columbia sent in identical recipes for the quiche. Ms. Albert writes that she cut it from The Sun several years ago and was glad to be reminded of it. "It is as good as ever," she wrote.Copper Mountain QuicheMakes 8 servings1/2 cup butter4 ounces cream cheese1 cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour1 pound fresh spinach, washed and trimmed or 1 package (10 ounces)
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 2, 2005
Quiche has so much going for it. It's easy to make, makes a great impression and, once you get the basic formula, you can dress it up or down with whatever happens to be in the fridge or pantry. Because quiche requires at least 25 minutes of cooking, we've used a lot of shortcuts in its preparation here: store-bought crust (refrigerated or frozen), prepackaged shredded cheese blends, pre-sliced mushrooms and bagged greens all contribute to a speedy preparation time. And another thing: Many quiche recipes call for pans with removable bottoms, but you can bypass the fussiness with a glass or ceramic pie pan - it'll work fine.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 11, 2005
Gertrude McSpiritt from East Windsor, N.J., was looking for a simple quiche recipe that would be suitable to teach her 10-year-old grandchild. She is 86 years old and still loves to cook but she "can't cope with a long recipe." Terrill Ross from Salem, Ore., sent in a recipe for Goodnight Quiche that "is very easy and very good." Because the recipe calls for a frozen pie shell, it takes no time to make and is virtually fail-safe. It has only a few basic ingredients and the only extra step is browning the ground beef.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ROB HIAASEN | May 21, 2000
From: Midshipmen Food Services Division. April 2000. Food survey, conducted of 282 food items currently prepared for entire brigade of 4,000 midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy. Survey results will be used in preparation of revised menu for upcoming Plebe Summer. Midshipmen who participated in the biannual survey (35 percent of brigade) received a 20-ounce Mountain Dew and a "giant Rice Krispie treat." Source: U.S. Naval Academy. Frequency table (percentage of midshipmen expressing approval of the following items)
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | December 8, 2002
Late last month, good friends telephoned to invite us to dinner, but the week before the party, the hostess was called out of town because of an illness in her family. Hearing this, I was certain that the get-together would be canceled, but this was not the case. Arriving home just two days before the scheduled event, she called to assure us that she would be entertaining that evening. I couldn't imagine how she was going to undertake all the cooking herself, so I volunteered to bring a dish.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2011
Jareene Barkdoll of Baltimore was hoping we would be able to find the recipe for the Southwestern-style quiche served at the Severn Inn in Annapolis. A friend treated her to Sunday brunch at the inn for her birthday, and she so enjoyed the quiche that she wanted to re-create it at home. She said it was served with an avocado salsa and topped with black beans. Philip Sokolowski, executive chef at the Severn Inn, was kind enough to share his recipe for the quiche. What makes this quiche unusual, aside from the Southwestern seasoning, is that the typical pastry crust is replaced with tortillas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | January 22, 2009
Bonjour 6070 Falls Road, 410-372-0238. Winter hours: 7:30 a.m.-noon Mondays; 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays; 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays. It is hard to visit a French bakery and not eat sweets. But the savories at Bonjour proved to be delectable takeout items for a quick lunch and a fast dinner. This small shop near Lake Avenue often has a flag flying outside. In warm weather, a bicycle or two is parked outside and a cyclist or two is inside, carb-loading. The quiche is made daily by Gerard Billebault, his wife, Gayle Brier, and their staff.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2008
The good news for Baltimore chef Jill Snyder was that she had much more screen time on Episode 2 of this season's Top Chef. The bad news was that she was eliminated. The judges found fault with not only her ostrich-egg quiche (looked like "dog food," tasted like "glue"), but her half-hearted defense at the judges' table, too. An earlier Quickfire Challenge involving hot dogs didn't go so well for her either, when she appeared to take an easy way out with the assignment by not "making" her own hot dog. Snyder's next step is uncertain - she has left Red Maple, where she was executive chef.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | August 23, 2006
You know it is garden-glut season when free zucchini sit untouched outside the garden gate; when bags of tomatoes appear in the office; and when summer squash shows up at every potluck supper. This is the season of plentitude, of bounty, of overkill. It is in full bloom in August but its roots go back to the enthusiasms of April. That is when we gardeners succumbed to the notion of planting extra rows of vegetables. Now those once-timid seedlings have morphed into towers of hairy vegetation, pushing out produce faster than the assembly line at the old Broening Highway plant used to push out Chevys.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 11, 2005
Gertrude McSpiritt from East Windsor, N.J., was looking for a simple quiche recipe that would be suitable to teach her 10-year-old grandchild. She is 86 years old and still loves to cook but she "can't cope with a long recipe." Terrill Ross from Salem, Ore., sent in a recipe for Goodnight Quiche that "is very easy and very good." Because the recipe calls for a frozen pie shell, it takes no time to make and is virtually fail-safe. It has only a few basic ingredients and the only extra step is browning the ground beef.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 30, 2005
Wes Long from Loudon, Tenn., was looking for a recipe for Asparagus Soup. Rose Norris of Santa Rosa, Calif., responded with a recipe she found years ago in her local newspaper that she thought he would enjoy. She says that when asparagus is in season, she and her husband enjoy this delicious soup. Now that asparagus is in the stores year-round, this soup can be made any time of year, but the spring crop is usually the best and most affordable. Recipe requests Gertrude McSpiritt from East Windsor, N.J., would like to have a simple quiche recipe suitable to teach her 10-year-old grandchild.
NEWS
By CeCe Sullivan and CeCe Sullivan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | April 7, 2002
In our love affair with quiche, we've gone through all of the stages of a longstanding, complicated relationship. When first introduced by Julia Child and friends to quiche Lorraine in Mastering the Art of French Cooking, we were seduced by its silky, creamy custard studded with crisp bits of bacon. We fell into the heady excitement of a new love when chefs began adding luxurious slivers of smoked salmon and Black Forest ham and sun-dried tomatoes. With the publication of Real Men Don't Eat Quiche by Bruce Feirstein and Lee Lorenz in 1982, our passion began to cool and quiche became somewhat of a joke.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | January 22, 2009
Bonjour 6070 Falls Road, 410-372-0238. Winter hours: 7:30 a.m.-noon Mondays; 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays; 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays. It is hard to visit a French bakery and not eat sweets. But the savories at Bonjour proved to be delectable takeout items for a quick lunch and a fast dinner. This small shop near Lake Avenue often has a flag flying outside. In warm weather, a bicycle or two is parked outside and a cyclist or two is inside, carb-loading. The quiche is made daily by Gerard Billebault, his wife, Gayle Brier, and their staff.
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 2, 2005
Quiche has so much going for it. It's easy to make, makes a great impression and, once you get the basic formula, you can dress it up or down with whatever happens to be in the fridge or pantry. Because quiche requires at least 25 minutes of cooking, we've used a lot of shortcuts in its preparation here: store-bought crust (refrigerated or frozen), prepackaged shredded cheese blends, pre-sliced mushrooms and bagged greens all contribute to a speedy preparation time. And another thing: Many quiche recipes call for pans with removable bottoms, but you can bypass the fussiness with a glass or ceramic pie pan - it'll work fine.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2004
If ever a cookbook belonged in a gift basket instead of in your kitchen library, Loaves, Cakes & Quiches (Hachette Illustrated, 2003, $9.95) is it. Compiled by the monomial Ilona and beautifully illustrated with the photographs of Akiko Ida, it is a slim and pretty collection of recipes for desserts, breakfast breads and quiches, and the perfect addition to a shower or wedding present. Though it includes some interesting variations - pumpkin-and-cheese quiche, Roquefort, pear and walnut loaf - and some old favorites - tarte tatin, strawberry and rhubarb tart - it is not comprehensive or well edited.
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