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NEWS
July 22, 2014
In a letter in the Sun, Kelli Kirchner of Cumberland expresses her happiness with the Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby decision and seems to believe no one should question or try to change it ( "Why is Mikulski trying to 'fix' the Supreme Court decision?" July 20). Well, I have news for her. As long as we have freedom of speech (as protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution), we will always be free to question and try to change (via legislation or constitutional amendment) any decision of any court.
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NEWS
By Daniel Heimpel | July 17, 2014
Earlier this month, The Baltimore Sun published an important story describing the expansion of Alternative Response (AR) across Maryland (" A new tactic to halt child abuse in Maryland ," July 5). The new system assigns child abuse and neglect cases to one of two tiered tracks based upon whether they are deemed low or high risk. High risk cases are formally investigated, low risk ones are not. While Maryland's Department of Human Resources, certain advocates, and a clot of consultants and evaluators celebrate the move to what they see as an evolution in the state's response to child abuse, they are missing - or worse, disregarding - simple documented truths that should shake any reasonable person's confidence.
NEWS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
As baby boomers ebb out of the workforce and into retirement, financial advisers are helping wind down their clients' careers by preparing them for soon-to-be-reduced incomes. Meet Cyndi Hutchins, Bank of America Merrill Lynch's director of financial gerontology — one of the country's first such positions at a financial management firm. Her recent appointment marks the company's first foray into the science of aging. Hutchins works with other Merrill Lynch financial advisers to manage their clients' transitions into retirement.
NEWS
July 15, 2014
The death of a severely disabled foster child earlier this month while under the care of a group home in Anne Arundel County that Maryland health regulators were in the process of shutting down inevitably raises the question of whether the boy's life could have been saved if state officials had acted more quickly. The state has launched three separate investigations into 10-year-old Damaud Martin's death, but the results may not be known for months. Regardless of whether anything could have changed Damaud's fate, though, the investigative reporting by The Sun's Doug Donovan into the troubled history of LifeLine raises real questions about whether the state's oversight of such care providers is adequate to protect some of the state's most vulnerable young people.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 14, 2014
Federal environmental officials may be overestimating farm pollution reductions in the Chesapeake Bay, contends a Washington environmental group, which also finds that phosphorus and algae concentrations in rivers on Maryland's Eastern Shore have shown no real improvement over the last decade Those are the conclusions of a pair of reports released Monday by the Environmental Integrity Project. State monitoring data showed no reduction in phosphorus levels in eight waterways on the Shore from 2003 to 2013, while concentrations actually worsened in three rivers: the Nanticoke, the Sassafras, and the Transquaking.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
Dan Naor got his start in Baltimore 20 years ago, when he found a 16-acre waterfront property for sale and decided to make the leap into the local marina business. Today, the Inner Harbor is a vastly different place than it was in 1994, and Naor's Baltimore Marine Centers operates five marinas in the surrounding area. "In the beginning it was a little rough," said Naor, a native of Israel whose company now acts as an intermediary between Baltimore and some of its most well-heeled guests.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 8, 2014
I realize it's impolite to stand up in the 21st century and declare something that was established in Colonial Maryland - say, the election of sheriffs in every county and Baltimore City - to be archaic, inefficient and unnecessary. But with all due respect to the old snuff-sniffers in powdered wigs who mandated it, I can no longer remain seated. Voting for sheriffs is as silly as silk pants. So is voting for registers of wills. Ditto for orphans' court judges, clerks of the court, and even state's attorneys.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Business author Richie Frieman has studied fine arts at the University of Maryland, launched a music-focused Internet magazine, written children's books, invented a device that keeps shirt collars crisp and created a pop culture-inspired children's clothing line - Charm City Babies. He even toured the Mid-Atlantic as a professional wrestler, retiring in 2008. So what does all of that have to do with good manners? Frieman, author of workplace etiquette book "Reply All … And Other Ways to Tank Your Career," considers himself an artist first and foremost.
NEWS
By Lori K. Brown | July 1, 2014
A Shar-Pei dog named Nala was set loose in a backyard with an inadvertently open gate in Canton last month. Shortly afterward, a well-meaning woman was bitten superficially by Nala as she tried to catch the dog. The woman then called the police, who sent officers to respond to the call. Veteran Officers Jeffrey Bolger and Thomas Schmidt gained control of the dog with a piece of equipment called a catch pole. A dog restrained with a catch pole can then be transported safely. But that's not what the two officers did, according to police.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
J.W. Treuth & Sons has been nestled in Oella so long, Michael Treuth said no one can figure out quite when the family-owned slaughterhouse and butcher shop first opened its doors, though a sign out front boasts more than 100 years in the business. The 56-year old president and co-owner has been working in the family business for more than 40 years, and said the meat industry is what he "lives and breathes, literally. " Treuth & Sons only slaughters cattle, but it also buys wholesale and then sells and ships chicken, poultry and seafood products to customers, primarily restaurants, nationwide.
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