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NEWS
February 17, 2014
On average, about 2,600 bills are introduced during a 90-day General Assembly session, so governors rarely have much to say about 99 percent of them, at least not until they've at least had a public hearing or perhaps even a committee vote. But that wasn't the case with Senate Bill 725, which apparently is so distasteful that Gov. Martin O'Malley promised to veto it within days of its mere introduction in Annapolis. Not only did he threaten to veto it, but Mr. O'Malley even publicly used that phrase offered by President George H. W. Bush to "read my lips" that he wouldn't approve the new tax (apparently ignoring the irony of a Democratic governor quoting a Republican president on a promise he so infamously reversed course on)
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Happenstance brought Suzy Ganz from Wall Street to a Baltimore County manufacturer. A deep interest in the work kept her there. Before she was CEO and chairman of Lion Brothers Co., an Owings Mills maker of brand logos, uniform insignia, Girl Scout badges and similar products, Ganz was an international equities trader and bond specialist. Her only connection to Lion was that her father had acquired it with a group of investors. Then he died unexpectedly. Her mother asked her to take a look at the business so they could figure out what to do. What started as a 90-day commitment at age 28 grew into a career that's already lasted more than a quarter-century.
NEWS
February 13, 2014
Are Republican Reps. Andy Harris of Maryland and Jack Kingston of Georgia calling for an investigation into the federal spending on Maryland's Affordable Care Act insurance exchange out of a sincere desire to make sure it works efficiently and effectively? We doubt it. And is Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown's campaign spokesman right that Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's demand for an accounting of the money spent so far on the exchange is motivated by the politics of the governor's race?
NEWS
By John Fritze and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Two Republican lawmakers called Wednesday for an investigation into federal money spent on Maryland's troubled health insurance exchange, raising questions that could shed light on whether the Obama administration foresaw problems with the site before its launch. In a letter to the inspector general of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Reps. Andy Harris of Maryland and Jack Kingston of Georgia ask auditors to review why millions of federal dollars flowed into the project despite warnings from a consultant about problems.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
One of the great things about my profession and social media -- Twitter, in particular -- is the immediacy with which writers can interact with readers. I'll be stepping away from Twitter for a little bit before I head down to Florida in a few weeks for spring training. So I decided last night to invite readers to ask me some Orioles questions, and I'd answer a chunk of them before I slip away temporarily. Here's a sampling of the questions I received and my answers (in most cases I expounded beyond the 140 characters permitted on Twitter)
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | February 12, 2014
Baltimore County Public Schools Superintendent Dallas Dance faced questions last week from the Baltimore County Planning Board and Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot regarding the controversial central area elementary school construction plan. "The reason we're asking the questions is before the county and state spend $31 million when all we're hearing is community upset about the scenario, we want to make sure we've explored every option for spending the right way," said Scott Jenkins, a member of the Baltimore County Planning Board.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley on Tuesday demanded that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security explain why federal officials are deporting a higher share of noncriminals from Maryland than from most other states under a controversial immigration program called Secure Communities. In a sharply worded letter to Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, the governor called on the federal agency to document why the program has led to the deportation of undocumented immigrants with either no criminal record or only misdemeanor convictions, when its long-stated intent is to target dangerous criminals.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
When Carnival Cruise Lines decided to leave Baltimore last summer, saying the port had become too expensive because of environmental regulations, it was with substantial regret. The world's largest cruise line regularly filled its Carnival Pride cruise ship at the port of Baltimore with affluent first-time cruisers who found the Mid-Atlantic jumping-off point convenient. Meanwhile, Maryland saw about $50 million a year in economic value from the ship. After hearing the Pride would be heading to Florida to cut costs, state officials immediately began trying to salvage the relationship.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
When Maryland first lady Catherine Curran O'Malley sits down to watch the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, she'll feel a little uneasy. Like many Marylanders and others around the world, the start of the games has left O'Malley wondering what more can be done for Russia's gay community, and what watching the games means. They wonder whether watching condones Russia's anti-gay record. Conversely, is not watching a protest? What can people do to support the athletes? O'Malley, who has spent time in Russia and admires its culture and people, will watch - but not without reflection.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Putting too much stress on your joints? Or maybe arthritis has become an issue? Athletes, seniors or anyone in these categories could develop a bone spur, or extra bone produced by the body. There are some things to do at home if it causes short-term pain, and a doctor can offer suggestions if the pain doesn't stop, according to Dr. James Nace, an orthopedic surgeon with the LifeBridge Health Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics and a physical therapist. What is a bone spur, and why does it form?
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