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NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | February 27, 2014
A proposed large paved bus lot and additional parking behind Dumbarton Middle School as part of its $27.5-million renovation and addition project has come under scrutiny from architects and planners in the community. They say they aren't necessary for the walker-heavy school. "Our bottom line here is that the outside site plan works fine and it should not change," Stu Sirota, president of the Rodgers Forge Community Association, said. "It's worked [the way it is] for over half a century.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
Drivers suspected of causing serious accidents in Maryland while distracted by a cellphone would be required to give police certain information from that phone under a pair of bills currently filed in Annapolis. The bills also would make distracted driving resulting in a death or serious injury a misdemeanor in Maryland, punishable by up to 3 years in prison and a fine of up to $5,000. Advocates say the legislation would save lives by deterring distracted driving in an age when cellphone use is increasingly being linked to deadly car accidents, and when many in Maryland support harsher penalties for it. Civil liberty advocates have raised concerns about the proposed law's constitutionality.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
In 2011, Prince George's County Del. Benjamin S. Barnes became a partner in one of the state's busiest workers' compensation firms. The lawmaker wrote a three-word disclosure in blue ink on his state ethics forms, and began working on legislation that made it easier for injured workers to win awards. As he sponsored or co-sponsored workers' compensation bills, his firm's founding partner brought in millions in workers' compensation claims over an 18-month period - raising questions about whether Barnes should be advocating for laws that could help his business.
NEWS
February 24, 2014
It's a given that politicians like to spend money but they don't like to raise taxes. After all, the former makes them popular with their constituents and the latter has the opposite effect. Rarely is this more evident than in an election year. Marylanders may want to keep that in mind if they're bewildered by how less than one year after the General Assembly approved a major gas tax increase, lawmakers are back debating whether to raise transportation-related taxes again. To the outsider, it has the look of a pack of ravenous wolves squabbling over a recent kill while eyeing a deer across the meadow rather than being satisfied with the bounty before them.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
As the Baltimore Colts were leaving the city in early 1984, the team's director of sales recalled sitting at the Rusty Scupper bar at the Inner Harbor, wondering what he should do next. A friend told Bob Leffler he should start his own advertising agency. After about three months, he had one employee and his first clients, including a moving company. By late summer, he landed his first big ad contract, with Laurel Race Course, and moved into a North Charles Street office. This month, the Leffler Agency turned 30. It has become the ad agency for numerous sports-related clients, including athletic programs for colleges such as the Naval Academy, Towson University, George Mason University and the University of Delaware.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
As blue balloons drifted Saturday night into the warm February sky above Southeast Baltimore, family members and friends of 8-year-old Troy Douglas wrapped their arms around each other in grief. Were "Li'l Troy" still alive, he probably would have been at the playground or the basketball court near the small courtyard in Perkins Homes where the memorial was held in his honor. Instead, his father mourned in a T-shirt bearing his image, reading, "I Love You Son. Play in Peace. " "I'm trying to come to terms," said his father, also named Troy Douglas.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Lila Shapiro-Cyr had never felt even a tinge of misgiving about the Ray Rice poster behind the fish tank in her boys' room, about the No. 27 Ravens jersey her 9-year-old loved to wear during football season. And yet earlier this week, the Baltimore attorney and mother of two found herself sharing an uncomfortable conversation with her sons about domestic violence and the complexities of idolizing public figures. Rice, the beaming presence on the wall of their Mt. Washington home, was suddenly a man accused of knocking his fiancée unconscious at a New Jersey casino.
NEWS
February 20, 2014
The U.S. Department of Agriculture is still expanding the list of retailers carrying meat unfit for human consumption to Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oregon, Washington and 970 locations in California alone. About 8.7 million pounds were shipped all through 2013 by Rancho Feeding Corporation of Petaluma, California. The recall comes in the wake of USDA's new "inspection" program that allows the meat industry to increase speed of processing lines and replace federal inspectors with plant employees.
NEWS
February 17, 2014
On average, about 2,600 bills are introduced during a 90-day General Assembly session, so governors rarely have much to say about 99 percent of them, at least not until they've at least had a public hearing or perhaps even a committee vote. But that wasn't the case with Senate Bill 725, which apparently is so distasteful that Gov. Martin O'Malley promised to veto it within days of its mere introduction in Annapolis. Not only did he threaten to veto it, but Mr. O'Malley even publicly used that phrase offered by President George H. W. Bush to "read my lips" that he wouldn't approve the new tax (apparently ignoring the irony of a Democratic governor quoting a Republican president on a promise he so infamously reversed course on)
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Happenstance brought Suzy Ganz from Wall Street to a Baltimore County manufacturer. A deep interest in the work kept her there. Before she was CEO and chairman of Lion Brothers Co., an Owings Mills maker of brand logos, uniform insignia, Girl Scout badges and similar products, Ganz was an international equities trader and bond specialist. Her only connection to Lion was that her father had acquired it with a group of investors. Then he died unexpectedly. Her mother asked her to take a look at the business so they could figure out what to do. What started as a 90-day commitment at age 28 grew into a career that's already lasted more than a quarter-century.
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