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By DAN BERGER | May 28, 2001
Slogans from History: Queen City of the Patapsco Drainage Basin! (J. Goodspeed) ... Mobtown! (anon., 19th cent.) Baltimore - Home of the Lacrosse Hall of Fame and National Museum of Dentistry! Baltimore: Black and White and Crabby All Over! Middle Maryland (Mid-Md.)! ... Lord of cities! ... Birdland! ... Seattle East! ... The Sunbelt! Better a city without a slogan than a slogan without a city.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 31, 2013
The planning is underway in Baltimore's $1 billion-plus, decade-long effort to bring public schools into the 21st century - in fact, there's a design expo at Morgan State University this weekend - which means we have entered a seminal period in the city's history. I'm sure that sounds grandiose. So let me concede a point to the jaded and the cynical who reject the possibility of The Next Big Thing ever coming to the Queen City of the Patapsco Drainage Basin. The city's long recovery from the loss of unionized manufacturing jobs and middle-class families, the epoch of drug addiction and violence, the years of declining schools and neighborhoods - all of that has left many of us (maybe most of us)
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NEWS
April 28, 1996
KNOWN AS THE "Queen City," Cumberland once was a bustling mountain town of 38,000, the hub of westward expansion, first by way of the National Road, then the C&O Canal and finally the railroads. Industries flourished. Laborers flocked to town for the jobs. Tourists and businessmen kept hotels and resorts prosperous.No longer.Cumberland is a skid-row dowager with empty storefronts and long-vacant industrial plants. The jobs are gone and the town's isolation has discouraged new companies from coming.
NEWS
August 26, 2013
For those who missed it, the latest news in Towson is that the Baltimore County Council will soon take up legislation to consider whether more people ought to be allowed to keep chickens in their backyards. The bill doesn't actually make a decision on whether this should happen but merely calls for a review of current regulations. In other words, county leaders are going to have to decide: What comes first, the chickens or the regs? Sorry about that. But the pun-sensitive may want to stop reading at this point and not get their feathers in a ruffle over what is coming next.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 31, 2013
The planning is underway in Baltimore's $1 billion-plus, decade-long effort to bring public schools into the 21st century - in fact, there's a design expo at Morgan State University this weekend - which means we have entered a seminal period in the city's history. I'm sure that sounds grandiose. So let me concede a point to the jaded and the cynical who reject the possibility of The Next Big Thing ever coming to the Queen City of the Patapsco Drainage Basin. The city's long recovery from the loss of unionized manufacturing jobs and middle-class families, the epoch of drug addiction and violence, the years of declining schools and neighborhoods - all of that has left many of us (maybe most of us)
NEWS
August 26, 2013
For those who missed it, the latest news in Towson is that the Baltimore County Council will soon take up legislation to consider whether more people ought to be allowed to keep chickens in their backyards. The bill doesn't actually make a decision on whether this should happen but merely calls for a review of current regulations. In other words, county leaders are going to have to decide: What comes first, the chickens or the regs? Sorry about that. But the pun-sensitive may want to stop reading at this point and not get their feathers in a ruffle over what is coming next.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens | May 16, 2004
ON THAT CLEAR, sunny morn in the fall of 1954, when Walter Arthur Gill entered City College as a high school senior, the 17-year-old wasn't thinking about court cases or making history or the now-seminal Brown vs. Board of Education decision to desegregate America's schools. A stellar art program, not racial politics, had brought him to the so-called Castle on the Hill, then the Ivy League of public high schools locally and nationwide. And this bright young man simply wanted to register and get to class.
NEWS
October 11, 2000
SOME FOLKS DREAM the impossible dreams of Monroe "The Great Communicator" Cornish and fantasize about being the mayor of Baltimore. As William Donald Schaefer might say, save that for the Irish banjo players. I want to be King of the Queen City of the Patapsco River Drainage Basin. The King of Baltimore! With benevolence and devotion, I would rule without being crippled by compromise or the charade of consensus. Preservationists would be the favored ministers in my court. Bankers, after making sound but sympathetic loans to working people, would serve fresh lemonade to artisans laboring to restore Reservoir Hill to magnificence.
SPORTS
By Ray Schaefer and Ray Schaefer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 30, 2000
CINCINNATI -- New game. Same old result. The BayRunners lost their 12th straight last night, 119-95, to the Cincinnati Stuff at Firstar Center. Cincinnati's magic number for clinching the International Basketball League's East title is now at five, and the Stuff claimed its seventh win over Baltimore in eight games. And the BayRunners? More misery -- winless in March, a 13-35 overall overall and a 2-20 mark on the road. Still, coach Terry Truax doesn't think his players have given up. "It looks like there's no incentive," he said.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss | May 31, 2000
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - Cincinnati Reds general manager Jim Bowden put Queen City media on a 48-hour notice Monday that he was prepared to announce a major trade. Speculation immediately sprouted that the Reds and Orioles were discussing a trade involving pitcher Scott Erickson. While the Reds assigned a scout to the Tampa Bay series, vice president of baseball operations Syd Thrift said last night that the two teams have not spoken recently. "Scott Erickson's not going anywhere," Thrift said of the Reds rumor.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens | May 16, 2004
ON THAT CLEAR, sunny morn in the fall of 1954, when Walter Arthur Gill entered City College as a high school senior, the 17-year-old wasn't thinking about court cases or making history or the now-seminal Brown vs. Board of Education decision to desegregate America's schools. A stellar art program, not racial politics, had brought him to the so-called Castle on the Hill, then the Ivy League of public high schools locally and nationwide. And this bright young man simply wanted to register and get to class.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | May 28, 2001
Slogans from History: Queen City of the Patapsco Drainage Basin! (J. Goodspeed) ... Mobtown! (anon., 19th cent.) Baltimore - Home of the Lacrosse Hall of Fame and National Museum of Dentistry! Baltimore: Black and White and Crabby All Over! Middle Maryland (Mid-Md.)! ... Lord of cities! ... Birdland! ... Seattle East! ... The Sunbelt! Better a city without a slogan than a slogan without a city.
NEWS
October 11, 2000
SOME FOLKS DREAM the impossible dreams of Monroe "The Great Communicator" Cornish and fantasize about being the mayor of Baltimore. As William Donald Schaefer might say, save that for the Irish banjo players. I want to be King of the Queen City of the Patapsco River Drainage Basin. The King of Baltimore! With benevolence and devotion, I would rule without being crippled by compromise or the charade of consensus. Preservationists would be the favored ministers in my court. Bankers, after making sound but sympathetic loans to working people, would serve fresh lemonade to artisans laboring to restore Reservoir Hill to magnificence.
SPORTS
By Ray Schaefer and Ray Schaefer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 30, 2000
CINCINNATI -- New game. Same old result. The BayRunners lost their 12th straight last night, 119-95, to the Cincinnati Stuff at Firstar Center. Cincinnati's magic number for clinching the International Basketball League's East title is now at five, and the Stuff claimed its seventh win over Baltimore in eight games. And the BayRunners? More misery -- winless in March, a 13-35 overall overall and a 2-20 mark on the road. Still, coach Terry Truax doesn't think his players have given up. "It looks like there's no incentive," he said.
NEWS
April 28, 1996
KNOWN AS THE "Queen City," Cumberland once was a bustling mountain town of 38,000, the hub of westward expansion, first by way of the National Road, then the C&O Canal and finally the railroads. Industries flourished. Laborers flocked to town for the jobs. Tourists and businessmen kept hotels and resorts prosperous.No longer.Cumberland is a skid-row dowager with empty storefronts and long-vacant industrial plants. The jobs are gone and the town's isolation has discouraged new companies from coming.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | November 12, 1999
HAD THE palooka worn a Dallas Cowboys jersey with "Aikman" on the back, or a Baltimore Ravens jersey with "R. Lewis" on the back, or maybe a Chicago Bulls tank top with "Jordan" on the back, Ed Donnellan would not have paid any attention.But the palooka wore a handsome, tricolor Baltimore Youth Hockey jersey with "Donnellan" on the back, and that's why it caught Donnellan's eye.And that's why the palooka went to the penalty box at Central Booking.What we have here is one of those rare events worth savoring -- a true crime comedy involving a thief who's apparently short of discretion and low of wit. He reminds me of the guy who held up a Baltimore bank while dressed in an Army field jacket with his name on the breast.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 27, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* With the first California execution in 25 years in the headlines just last week (of convicted double murderer Robert Alton Harris), NBC has an unusually timely made-for-television movie tonight."In the Shadow of a Killer" stars Scott Bakula ("Quantum Leap") as a policeman who opposes capital punishment. And his moral stance brings him into conflict with fellow officers when he apprehends a suspect in the murder of another police officer.Of course, things get mixed up when Bakula's character also becomes the apparent target of a mob contract.
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