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NEWS
By Daniel Berger | November 11, 1995
NATION-STATES, it is fashionable to say, are obsolete. They are insufficient to national purpose, their economies too small, their boundaries unreal.Larger entities are taking over. The European Union is the trend setter. The North American Free Trade Agreement is a first step for this hemisphere. And so nationalisms that break nation-states into smaller units seem anachronistic, harmful, self-destructive. Yugoslavia is now fashionably judged never to have worked.From this standpoint, those Quebecers who want independence seem to be fighting against the grain of history.
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NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein | November 5, 1995
FOR CANADIANS, it was the best of decisions and it was the worst of decisions.The results of Monday's Quebec referendum on seeking independence were comforting to people outside the province, and to a slim majority of those inside, because the Yesses lost and the country was still in one piece. It was the worst of decisions because the vote was so close that the issue remains as alive and threatening as ever.For Quebec separatists, the reasoning is the same but positions reversed."It's a victory for nobody," said Marc Lalonde, a minister under former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, who battled an earlier separatist rebellion 15 years ago.That 1980 referendum was defeated 60 percent to 40 percent.
NEWS
By TRB | November 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- This is a trick question. Three days before Quebec's sovereignty referendum, when anti-sovereigntists rallied in Montreal, how large was the turnout, as reported by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation?Answer: Depends on what you mean by ''Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.'' According to Newsworld, the CBC's English-language all-news channel, the turnout was 150,000. According to RDI, the CBC's French-language all-news channel, the turnout was 35,000.Of all the reasons to believe that sovereignty for Quebec is still in the cards, the biggest may be the force this anecdote crystallizes: the balkanizing tendency of some modern communications technologies.
NEWS
November 1, 1995
FULLY 93 PERCENT of Quebec's eligible voters turned out for the referendum on sovereignty. They really cared. The outcome was so close -- 49.44 percent in favor but 50.56 percent opposed -- that nothing was decided.Technically, the bid failed. The procedure pledged by the Quebec government will not go forward. But the separatists' gain from a 60-40 loss 15 years ago was so great that their message is to continue. They have no incentive now to make Canada work.Separatists' view in any country is that if you lose a plebiscite, you hold it again and again until you win it, and the first win will be permanent and irreversible.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | October 28, 1995
QUEBECERS ARE the Canadians with no identity crisis. They know who they are and they know their roots. They are proud to be the only French-speaking majority in North America.And they know what they are not. They are not Americans. They don't have to keep convincing themselves of that. It makes them relatively pro-American.When Ontarians object to Americans taking over their job opportunities or swamping their culture, Quebecers worry only about English-speaking Canadians doing that.Canada, the world's second-largest country, is geographically unnatural, held together throughout its history by federal policy.
NEWS
October 25, 1995
Quebec voters will decide on Monday whether Canada will go forward in unity or face the prospect of breaking into two countries. Canadians outside Quebec do not get to vote on Quebec sovereignty, and have only lately realized the referendum's profound effect on them.If the vote is no, Canada will remain intact, with a constitution that Quebec considers imperfect, but still a country that most people in all provinces consider one of the most blessed.But if the vote is yes -- that Quebec should offer a new partnership to the rest of Canada and upon rejection declare its sovereignty -- the only assured result would be prolonged and anguished confusion.
FEATURES
By Nick Charles and Nick Charles,NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | October 1, 1995
If it weren't so darn pleasant, Ottawa, Canada's national capital, would be certifiably schizophrenic.This two-language city combines the cultures of France and England and garnishes the mix with a hefty measure of indigenous Canadian character -- friendly to a fault and antiseptically clean.Situated on the border of the province of Quebec, at the confluence of the Rideau, Gatineau and Ottawa rivers, the area in which the city lies is often referred to as Canada's Capital Region because it spans two provinces (Ontario and Quebec)
NEWS
By MYRON BECKENSTEIN | September 17, 1995
As Quebec Premier Jacques Parizeau was getting ready to leave a meeting of all the Canadian provincial premiers recently, one of his fellows said he hoped they would see him again next year.Nothing personal, but Mr. Parizeau hopes they won't.Instead, he hopes that by this time next year Quebec will be just about ready to declare independence from the rest of Canada.In the election campaign that swept his party into office a year ago last week, Mr. Parizeau pledged to hold a referendum on independence eight to 10 months after victory.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 13, 1995
CALGARY, Alberta -- As Quebec voters prepare for an anticipated autumn vote on whether to separate from Canada, the rest of the country is sending a new message to would-be separatists: Love it or leave it.In a reversal of 30 years of Canadian popular sentiment and public policy, Quebecers are being told not to count on any more compromises or concessions in exchange for staying in the country, and to expect tough negotiations on the terms of separation if...
NEWS
May 3, 1995
Nationalisms feed on the protest vote, but weaken with any prospect of success. Then fear of the unknown takes over, instilling thoughtful moderation. Quebec is the latest case in point.When Jacques Parizeau's Parti Quebecois was elected to five years of power in the Canadian province last September, the new premier promised a referendum this year on sovereignty. He counted on enthusiasm and momentum to carry it, and let federal Canada worry about the legalities. He said a yes vote would bind his provincial parliament to bring about independence.
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