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By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Contributing Writer | November 22, 1992
If you want to absorb the sights, sounds and gastronomic delights of Europe without leaving North America, Quebec City is the place for you. It's as close to Paris as you're going to get on this side of the Atlantic.The city, steeped in four centuries of history and French tradition, is the oldest municipality in Canada's Quebec (pronounced "Ke-bec" by the locals) province. Quebec City is the only fortified city in North America, its stone walls perched strategically atop a cliff at a narrow point of the St. Lawrence River.
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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2010
Severna Park Middle School French teacher Mike McTammany said he was among a few county teachers in 2001 who sought to take students to Canada's French-speaking province, Quebec, to apply the language firsthand. Some classes were all set to go, but the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks prompted the school board to prohibit any foreign travel. McTammany said that some who had already paid for portions of the trip lost money. When foreign travel resumed for county schools, teachers sought again to go, and over the past few years there's been a steady stream of Anne Arundel students touring Quebec City, the provincial capital, and Montreal, the nation's second-largest city.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2005
Michelle Valerio Paras and Soufiane Ghadfa got married on December 3, 2004 at the Cloisters Castle. Michelle is the daughter of Victor and Corazon Paras, of Pampanga, Philippines. Soufiane is the son of Mohamed & Nora Ghadfa, of Casablanca, Morocco. The couple met at University of Baltimore, where Soufiane graduated with a Master's degree in Finance and Michelle graduated with an M.B.A. and a Master's degree in Industrial Psychology. The couple honeymooned in Quebec City, Canada and now resides in Delaware.
TRAVEL
By Richard P. Carpenter and Richard P. Carpenter,The Boston Globe | May 25, 2008
One of the least expensive and quickest ways to get a truly foreign travel experience is to visit Quebec City. And what better time than as it celebrates its 400th birthday in grand style? The look of this walled city is distinctly European, with a French accent, and with the U.S. and Canadian dollars close to each other in value, there is no euro shock. Here are some summer packages for enjoying the splendid city that Samuel de Champlain founded: This romantic city becomes even more so with the Madly in Love package from Loews le Concorde Hotel.
SPORTS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 12, 1996
MIAMI -- Thank you, Quebec City.It's been almost a year since the Quebec Nordiques relocated to Denver and became the Colorado Avalanche, but players haven't forgotten some of their biggest fans.Of the 24 players on the Avalanche postseason roster, 16 played at least part of one season in Quebec City. Avalanche captain Joe Sakic and defenseman Curtis Leschyshyn started their careers in Quebec in 1988."They're great fans, and it's too bad they couldn't be more of part of this," said Sakic, who scored 234 goals in 508 games during his seven seasons as a Nordique.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2010
Severna Park Middle School French teacher Mike McTammany said he was among a few county teachers in 2001 who sought to take students to Canada's French-speaking province, Quebec, to apply the language firsthand. Some classes were all set to go, but the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks prompted the school board to prohibit any foreign travel. McTammany said that some who had already paid for portions of the trip lost money. When foreign travel resumed for county schools, teachers sought again to go, and over the past few years there's been a steady stream of Anne Arundel students touring Quebec City, the provincial capital, and Montreal, the nation's second-largest city.
NEWS
By Sarah Anderson and John Cavanagh | April 20, 2001
WASHINGTON -- President Bush will join leaders of 33 countries behind the stone walls of Quebec City to try to make progress on a hemispheric trade deal called the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA). Outside the fortress, demonstrators are expected to turn Quebec City into Canada's Seattle while protests are planned in hundreds of cities across the hemisphere. Mr. Bush will ignore the noise at his own peril. In this fight, the protesters benefit from an arsenal of evidence accumulated under the North American Free Trade Agreement, the model for the proposed hemispheric pact.
TRAVEL
By Richard P. Carpenter and Richard P. Carpenter,The Boston Globe | May 25, 2008
One of the least expensive and quickest ways to get a truly foreign travel experience is to visit Quebec City. And what better time than as it celebrates its 400th birthday in grand style? The look of this walled city is distinctly European, with a French accent, and with the U.S. and Canadian dollars close to each other in value, there is no euro shock. Here are some summer packages for enjoying the splendid city that Samuel de Champlain founded: This romantic city becomes even more so with the Madly in Love package from Loews le Concorde Hotel.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | May 17, 1997
SAINT-NICOLAS, Quebec -- The bomb was simplicity itself. Fifty pounds of dynamite affixed to the gasoline tank of a Jeep. Insert detonator. Set timing device. Leave vehicle on the quiet street where Hell's Angels live.On March 8, the blast, attributed to a rival gang, shattered the stillness of this community, but hardly scratched the intended target -- the steel-shuttered, concrete-reinforced headquarters of the local chapter of "Les Hells," as riders of the world's most infamous motorcycle gang are called in Quebec.
NEWS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | January 12, 2001
MONTREAL - Quebec Premier Lucien Bouchard, the passionate champion of Quebec independence for the past decade, resigned yesterday in a surprise move that left the separatist movement in tatters and transformed the political dynamics of the nation. In an emotional address from Quebec City, he cited love for his American wife - who desperately wants him out of public life - and remorse for his inability to gain independence from Canada as the main reasons for his resignation. But he also lashed out at separatist hard-liners, whose obsessions with French ethnic purity have given Quebec a reputation as racist and anti-Semitic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2005
Michelle Valerio Paras and Soufiane Ghadfa got married on December 3, 2004 at the Cloisters Castle. Michelle is the daughter of Victor and Corazon Paras, of Pampanga, Philippines. Soufiane is the son of Mohamed & Nora Ghadfa, of Casablanca, Morocco. The couple met at University of Baltimore, where Soufiane graduated with a Master's degree in Finance and Michelle graduated with an M.B.A. and a Master's degree in Industrial Psychology. The couple honeymooned in Quebec City, Canada and now resides in Delaware.
NEWS
By Sarah Anderson and John Cavanagh | April 20, 2001
WASHINGTON -- President Bush will join leaders of 33 countries behind the stone walls of Quebec City to try to make progress on a hemispheric trade deal called the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA). Outside the fortress, demonstrators are expected to turn Quebec City into Canada's Seattle while protests are planned in hundreds of cities across the hemisphere. Mr. Bush will ignore the noise at his own peril. In this fight, the protesters benefit from an arsenal of evidence accumulated under the North American Free Trade Agreement, the model for the proposed hemispheric pact.
NEWS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | January 12, 2001
MONTREAL - Quebec Premier Lucien Bouchard, the passionate champion of Quebec independence for the past decade, resigned yesterday in a surprise move that left the separatist movement in tatters and transformed the political dynamics of the nation. In an emotional address from Quebec City, he cited love for his American wife - who desperately wants him out of public life - and remorse for his inability to gain independence from Canada as the main reasons for his resignation. But he also lashed out at separatist hard-liners, whose obsessions with French ethnic purity have given Quebec a reputation as racist and anti-Semitic.
NEWS
September 16, 2000
$15.5 million aid fine, more needed Serbian leader says BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - A Serbian opposition leader said yesterday that a Norwegian pledge of $15.5 million in aid if the opposition won next week's elections was welcome but a new government would need much more. "Serbia's consolidated budget deficit in 2001 will be $1 billion because an economic catastrophe befell Serbia in the past 10 years of [President Slobodan] Milosevic's rule," Mladjan Dinkic, leader of G17 group of independent economists, told a news conference.
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein | November 29, 1998
Canadian elections of recent years have been compelling because so much has been hanging in the balance - the continued existence of our northern neighbor as a united country. It is hanging in the balance again, as the people of Quebec go to the polls tomorrow.In 1980 and again in 1995, Quebec separatists pushed for referendums on whether the mostly French-speaking province - with 25 percent of the country's population - should secede from mostly English-speaking Canada.Both times the separatists lost, the last time barely.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | May 17, 1997
SAINT-NICOLAS, Quebec -- The bomb was simplicity itself. Fifty pounds of dynamite affixed to the gasoline tank of a Jeep. Insert detonator. Set timing device. Leave vehicle on the quiet street where Hell's Angels live.On March 8, the blast, attributed to a rival gang, shattered the stillness of this community, but hardly scratched the intended target -- the steel-shuttered, concrete-reinforced headquarters of the local chapter of "Les Hells," as riders of the world's most infamous motorcycle gang are called in Quebec.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 22, 1996
QUEBEC CITY -- Once again displaying a talent for tweaking the rest of Canada, Quebec has decided to roust the royal representative to the province from the official residence.The separatist Parti Quebecois government announced Wednesday that the mansion that has housed the Queen Elizabeth's envoy here for decades will be put up for sale. If it can't be quickly sold, it will be rented out.Officials conceded that the province has a legal obligation to provide living quarters for Her Majesty's lieutenant governor, who presides over ceremonies of state with much pomp but little power.
FEATURES
By Sharon Nicholas | March 31, 1991
With the charm of a Maurice Chevalier seasoned by a lifetime of salt air, Capt. Eloi Perron entertains visitors at his schooner museum on an island in the St. Lawrence Seaway. For a century, until the 1970s, schooners and the St. Lawrence -- the Sea, as it's called by locals -- were the lifeline of Quebec's Charlevoix (shar-luh-vwah) region. More than 300 wooden ships were built there, launching a nautical heritage. They evolved from tall ships with billowy sails and emergency backup systems (men in the hold with oars)
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 22, 1996
QUEBEC CITY -- Once again displaying a talent for tweaking the rest of Canada, Quebec has decided to roust the royal representative to the province from the official residence.The separatist Parti Quebecois government announced Wednesday that the mansion that has housed the Queen Elizabeth's envoy here for decades will be put up for sale. If it can't be quickly sold, it will be rented out.Officials conceded that the province has a legal obligation to provide living quarters for Her Majesty's lieutenant governor, who presides over ceremonies of state with much pomp but little power.
SPORTS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 12, 1996
MIAMI -- Thank you, Quebec City.It's been almost a year since the Quebec Nordiques relocated to Denver and became the Colorado Avalanche, but players haven't forgotten some of their biggest fans.Of the 24 players on the Avalanche postseason roster, 16 played at least part of one season in Quebec City. Avalanche captain Joe Sakic and defenseman Curtis Leschyshyn started their careers in Quebec in 1988."They're great fans, and it's too bad they couldn't be more of part of this," said Sakic, who scored 234 goals in 508 games during his seven seasons as a Nordique.
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