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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1996
Wanted: A hunchback. "Misshapen, unattractive, locked away by a cruel guardian in the bell tower of Notre Dame, he longs to be part of the life he sees below."Sounded like the perfect gig to B. Thomas Rinaldi, a rotund and swarthy product of Towson State's drama department. So the Baltimore actor showed up yesterday at Goucher College for a Disney audition of would-be Quasimodos and Esmeraldas for a new musical stage show at Disney/MGM Studios in Orlando, Fla.Mr. Rinaldi was eager to win the part of the deformed bell ringer, the star of Disney's soon-to-be released animated film "Hunchback of Notre Dame."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | February 15, 2008
The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923), starring Lon Chaney, Hollywood's first master horror star, as the unfortunate bell-ringer Quasimodo, whose love for the beautiful gypsy Esmeralda leads to tragic consequences for almost everyone involved, will be shown with live musical accompaniment Sunday at St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 1900 St. Paul St. Music will be provided by the Baltimore Opera Company's James Harp, organist and choirmaster at the church....
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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1996
Striking animation and cute gargoyles do not a kiddie movie make."The Hunchback of Notre Dame," the latest animated film from the Disney conglomerate, has some catchy songs and some amazing images. It also teaches lessons about prejudice and self-esteem.But it really isn't appropriate for Disney's bread-and-butter audience, the little kids who are too young for the latest action flick.Evidence: A lot of them started whining and screaming in the middle of a screening of "Hunchback" this week.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1997
A good story's a good story, which explains why TNT's "The Hunchback" makes for an enjoyable two hours.But Victor Hugo's "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" is a great story, full of sex and violence and pathos and parties and religion and tolling bells and did I mention sex and violence?So why isn't "The Hunchback," which premieres at 8 p.m. tomorrow (with repeats at 10 p.m. and midnight), better than good?Probably because the story has been adapted to the screen so many times, and done so well.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1997
A good story's a good story, which explains why TNT's "The Hunchback" makes for an enjoyable two hours.But Victor Hugo's "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" is a great story, full of sex and violence and pathos and parties and religion and tolling bells and did I mention sex and violence?So why isn't "The Hunchback," which premieres at 8 p.m. tomorrow (with repeats at 10 p.m. and midnight), better than good?Probably because the story has been adapted to the screen so many times, and done so well.
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By Michael H. Price and Michael H. Price,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | June 23, 1996
If Walt Disney were around to see the results of his cartoon studio's "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" adaptation, chances are he'd exclaim: "Gosh! This'll make Victor Hugo!"Disney had exclaimed similarly about his musically driven feature, "Fantasia," and Beethoven during the early 1940s, defining the true conceit of the popular culture: It actually fancies itself in a class with the higher forms.In a broader sense, however, Disney was also right about "Fantasia," for the arrogant concert-film experiment did introduce Beethoven and its other chosen composers to a whole new shirtsleeves audience.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | February 15, 2008
The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923), starring Lon Chaney, Hollywood's first master horror star, as the unfortunate bell-ringer Quasimodo, whose love for the beautiful gypsy Esmeralda leads to tragic consequences for almost everyone involved, will be shown with live musical accompaniment Sunday at St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 1900 St. Paul St. Music will be provided by the Baltimore Opera Company's James Harp, organist and choirmaster at the church....
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | July 21, 1996
HAVRE de GRACE -- There's a tremendous intellectual debate raging right now about the Disney people's cartoon version of ''The Hunchback of Notre Dame,'' and trying to follow it can make a person feel a little like a cartoon character himself, a spectator at a sort of madcap tennis game.First, Disney serves up ''Hunchback'' as fare for adults in kiddie camouflage, which is exactly the way McDonalds offered us the Arch Deluxe. At last, the creators of Mickey and Donald seem to be saying, grown-ups can send the children to bed and enjoy a cartoon movie themselves without feeling mildly creepy about it.That's because, animated or not, this is Victor Hugo.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1995
If you're a fan of old movies, this may be a good day to call in sick, cash in those eight hours of annual leave or program your VCR to work overtime. That is, as long as your cable system offers Turner Classic Movies. If not, well take a look at what you're missing.* "Sinatra: 80 Years My Way" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- OK, so it's a few days late. Last anyone heard, Mr. Sinatra is still 80, and people are still wanting to wish him well. Performers at this fete, taped last month in Los Angeles, include Tony Bennett, Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan, Natalie Cole and Little Richard.
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1996
Leave it to the Disney happy police to transform a medieval icon as ugly as sin into a comedic chorus line of wisecracking, lovable stone-phonies.When the animated version of Victor Hugo's epic "Hunchback of Notre Dame" premieres tomorrow, audiences will meet one gargoyle and two "gar-boys" who strut and quip their way through eternity while offering misguided advice to Quasimodo, a deformed bell ringer by profession.The trio, named Victor, Hugo and Laverne, are respectively characterized in a Disney press kit as "hedonistic," "stodgy" and "crotchety -- but caring."
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | July 21, 1996
HAVRE de GRACE -- There's a tremendous intellectual debate raging right now about the Disney people's cartoon version of ''The Hunchback of Notre Dame,'' and trying to follow it can make a person feel a little like a cartoon character himself, a spectator at a sort of madcap tennis game.First, Disney serves up ''Hunchback'' as fare for adults in kiddie camouflage, which is exactly the way McDonalds offered us the Arch Deluxe. At last, the creators of Mickey and Donald seem to be saying, grown-ups can send the children to bed and enjoy a cartoon movie themselves without feeling mildly creepy about it.That's because, animated or not, this is Victor Hugo.
NEWS
By Michael H. Price and Michael H. Price,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | June 23, 1996
If Walt Disney were around to see the results of his cartoon studio's "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" adaptation, chances are he'd exclaim: "Gosh! This'll make Victor Hugo!"Disney had exclaimed similarly about his musically driven feature, "Fantasia," and Beethoven during the early 1940s, defining the true conceit of the popular culture: It actually fancies itself in a class with the higher forms.In a broader sense, however, Disney was also right about "Fantasia," for the arrogant concert-film experiment did introduce Beethoven and its other chosen composers to a whole new shirtsleeves audience.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1996
Striking animation and cute gargoyles do not a kiddie movie make."The Hunchback of Notre Dame," the latest animated film from the Disney conglomerate, has some catchy songs and some amazing images. It also teaches lessons about prejudice and self-esteem.But it really isn't appropriate for Disney's bread-and-butter audience, the little kids who are too young for the latest action flick.Evidence: A lot of them started whining and screaming in the middle of a screening of "Hunchback" this week.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1996
Wanted: A hunchback. "Misshapen, unattractive, locked away by a cruel guardian in the bell tower of Notre Dame, he longs to be part of the life he sees below."Sounded like the perfect gig to B. Thomas Rinaldi, a rotund and swarthy product of Towson State's drama department. So the Baltimore actor showed up yesterday at Goucher College for a Disney audition of would-be Quasimodos and Esmeraldas for a new musical stage show at Disney/MGM Studios in Orlando, Fla.Mr. Rinaldi was eager to win the part of the deformed bell ringer, the star of Disney's soon-to-be released animated film "Hunchback of Notre Dame."
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 28, 1999
So far, Ricky Martin and Enrique Iglesias, the most recognizable names in Latin pop, have won fans as much through sex appeal as through vocal ability, suggesting that being a hunky heartthrob is more important to crossover success than being a great singer.Marc Anthony ought to change all that.Anthony doesn't lack for good looks; he wouldn't have such a strong second career on the stage and screen if he weren't easy on the eyes.But even if he came across like Quasimodo, there's enough beauty and charisma in his voice to ensure that "Marc Anthony" (Columbia 69726, arriving in stores today)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 4, 2002
The Winter 2002 season of Cinema Sundays at the Charles opens this weekend with Lantana, a thriller from director Ray Lawrence. The movie stars Barbara Hershey as psychiatrist Valerie Somers, who disappears one night; Anthony LaPaglia is Detective Leon Zat, who investigates - and whose wife has been seeing Dr. Somers. The cast also includes Geoffrey Rush. Lee Gardner, arts editor of the City Paper, will serve as host of Sunday's screening. Doors open at 9:45 a.m., and show time is 10:30 a.m. Coffee and bagels will be served.
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