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By ALICE STEINBACH | January 14, 1991
IT WAS A FEW MINUTES BEFORE air time and the talk show host was about to begin his daily radio program. He poured himself a cup of coffee and then, turning to me, said something surprising:"You know, this job never gets any easier," confessed this erudite man who for years has presided over an extremely popular call-in show. "Every time I go on the air, I have to overcome a fear that I'll fail; that the show won't be any good."He paused. "But I've found out something interesting about failing.
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By Steve McKerrow | November 30, 1990
More previews from The Weekend Watch:THE RACIAL QUESTION -- Blunt talk on touchy issues was the agenda of today's Baltimore Summit on Race Relations at the Convention Center, and WJZ-Channel 13 is doing a half-hour special on the event tonight. "Baltimore in Black and White" is scheduled at 7:30 p.m., with host Debbie Wright, the station's education reporter.A CULTURAL CONNECTION -- Who says entertaining television cannot also teach? Tonight's scheduled episode of "Quantum Leap" (at 8, Channel 2)
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October 8, 1990
AVALON," BARRY Levinson's valentine to Baltimore families and tradition, opened over the weekend, and Baltimore responded with sellout crowds at the Senator Theatre.More than 6,500 tickets were sold over the weekend at the 50-year-old theater on York Road, where the film had a benefit showing a week ago.Tom Kiefaber, owner of the Senator, said "Avalon" opened "on the level of an 'Indiana Jones' or a 'Hunt for Red October.' We have been very busy." "Avalon" chronicles the experiences of an immigrant family, the Krichinskys, in Baltimore.
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By Michael Hill | September 14, 1990
OK, now I think I've got the trick to this Emmy picking. Last year -- my first attempt at this game -- was pretty dismal, I admit. One right, in some forgettable supporting actor category.But what are you going to do in the year that they don't give the best movie/miniseries acting award to Robert Duvall for "Lonesome Dove?" You're going to get a lot wrong, that's what you're going to do.The problem was that I didn't factor in the absurd voting procedure. The Emmys are chosen by a bunch of essentially bored people, all members of the Television Academy, who have nothing better to do on a weekend in August -- heavy production season in network television -- than sit around in a hotel and watch screenings.
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