Advertisement
HomeCollectionsQuality Of Life
IN THE NEWS

Quality Of Life

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 10, 1992
Quality of life is a cliched buzzword that has become the secular equivalent of "hallowed," the incontrovertible cathexis of modern living. It's easy to misuse in public debate, a rhetorical shield against hard fact and rational policy.Fortunately, the quality of life argument did not hold sway with a majority of the Harford County Council Tuesday night as it voted down a proposal to close a small stretch of Old Fallston Road at the busy intersection with Route 152.In doing so, the council avoided setting a perilous precedent, a foothold for political maneuvering by any community to close its public road for safety reasons or to preserve the tranquillity (i.e.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Baltimore residents are asked to participate in a survey measuring qualify of life issues in the city, online and by phone through Sept. 29, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Tuesday. The Citizens Survey, which has been conducted since 2009, serves as a report card for the city, Rawlings-Blake said. City agencies use the data to write their budget proposals and gauge their performance. The mayor urged residents to participate. "It is imperative that we have a clear understanding of what issues are impacting our communities," Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | May 7, 1995
Angela Harrison and Derek Jackson represent two sides of living in Baltimore.Six years ago, Ms. Harrison changed neighborhoods because of crime. Now she wants to move again -- to Baltimore County. "I'm afraid to get out of my car at night," she said.Mr. Jackson, by contrast, just bought his first home in West Baltimore's Rosemont section. He says it was a great bargain. "You've got to give [the city] a chance," said the 27-year-old father of two. "I haven't had any bad experiences at all down here."
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | May 28, 2014
For years Americans have assumed that our hard-charging capitalism is better than the soft-hearted version found in Canada and Europe. American capitalism might be a bit crueler, but it generates faster growth and higher living standards overall. Canada and Europe's "welfare-state socialism" is doomed. It was a questionable assumption to begin with, relying to some extent on our collective amnesia about the first three decades after World War II, when tax rates on top incomes in the U.S. never fell below 70 percent, a larger portion of our economy was invested in education than ever before or since, over a third of our private-sector workers were unionized, we came up with Medicare for the elderly and Medicaid for the poor, and built the biggest infrastructure project in history, known as the interstate highway system.
NEWS
By Calvin M. Pierson | January 11, 1999
IMAGINE the public hue and cry that would greet efforts to reduce education spending in Maryland to levels below the national average. Educating Maryland's children is a vital element of our state's quality of life. Usually measures that threaten our quality of life come under fire.Interestingly, some regulators, managed-care companies and politicians are backing a plan that endangers another key element of our quality of life -- hospitals. The state body that sets hospital rates has proposed requiring Maryland hospitals to reduce costs for a hospital stay to 3 percent below the national average over the next two years.
FEATURES
By A. Roger Merrill and A. Roger Merrill,Special to the Sun | June 19, 1994
Is "faster" necessarily "better"?Most of us act as though we believe it is. Rush, busyness and urgency have become a way of life, both personally and organizationally. And what's the price? Stress? Tension? Yes, but there are even bigger costs -- opportunity costs.When we get caught in "the thick of thin things," it's not necessarily that the things we rush to do more of are bad; it's just that, often, they aren't the best. The "good" becomes the enemy of the "best."Please take a moment and visualize a large square divided into four smaller squares.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 4, 2001
JOYCE HLASS says that her son, Charlie, had a positive influence on many people during his 21 years of life. One year after Charlie's death from leukemia, Hlass is working to continue her son's legacy of brightening other people's lives through a foundation she started in his memory, Through Charlie's Eyes. The foundation was set up during the spring to raise money for enhancing the quality of life for patients ages 18-30 undergoing bone marrow and stem cell transplants. During Charlie's 16-month battle with acute myeloid leukemia, he underwent four stem cell transplants from his younger sister, Jennifer, now a junior at Towson University.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1998
A year ago, when western Howard Republican Councilman Charles C. Feaga announced that his former campaign manager, Gail H. Bates, would be running for his seat, it seemed as if Bates was the heir apparent.Bates, 52, had been active within the local Republican Party since 1980, serving on the central committee, teaching a campaign school for Republicans, working for campaigns, raising money and registering voters.She has been an assistant to Republican County Executive Charles I. Ecker since 1991.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1996
The Freedom area may be the fastest growing part of the county, but it is still a lovely place to live, a group of residents told Carroll planners this week.And they want to keep it that way.One of their goals, shared at a planning workshop Monday, is "to improve what [they] have with no significant additions" to the population.Monday's workshop was the first of three in which planners are seeking community comment to help update a growth-management plan for the Freedom area. The second is set for 7 p.m. today at Wesley Freedom United Methodist Church in Eldersburg.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2009
Salary: $62,000 Age: 32 Years on the job: 10 How she got started:: After graduating from Towson University with a bachelor's degree in psychology and sociology, Allen went to work as director of admissions for a Baltimore-area long-term nursing care and rehabilitation center. She came to Levindale in 1999 as a guest relations specialist. Two years later she became director of guest relations, and in 2006 she started as a "neighborhood" leader. Typical day:: The day starts early for Allen, who said she's usually in by about 6 a.m. One day a week, she arrives by 10 a.m. and stays through dinner service in an effort to keep in contact with all three shifts of employees.
NEWS
By Loni Ingraham | May 6, 2014
Jerry Truelove and a dozen of his Rodgers Forge neighbors have formed an ad hoc committee to negotiate with TU about a planned women's softball stadium. They claim the new construction will destroy their quality of life and decrease their property values and they want to see the stadium built elsewhere on the 328-acre campus, where it won't impact any homes. On a recent Sunday afternoon, Jerry Truelove stood  in the backyard of his Stanmore Court home near an 8-foot-high fence that separates Rodgers Forge from the Towson University campus when a ball dropped from the tree branches.
NEWS
By Wallace D. Loh | April 29, 2014
The nation suffers from more than a federal deficit. Studies by congressional and scientific panels repeatedly warn of an "innovation deficit" that weakens our technological edge. Decades of strong federal support for university research and education helped America prevail in the Cold War and fueled prosperity. When the federal government eased up on research funding in last year's across-the-board "sequestration" cuts, many scientists were shaken. Young and mid-career scientists began to question whether they can succeed here and worried about a research brain drain.
BUSINESS
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Donna Schramek is looking forward to retirement on the Eastern Shore. She loves the smell of the ocean, walking on the beach, and spending time with her grandchildren. That's why the 64-year-old Brooklyn Park administrative coordinator at Medstar Health didn't hesitate to have arthroscopic knee surgery last month. The pain "was making me feel old," says Schramek, who plans to retire in the next two years. "It was limiting me. " Health is an important consideration as workers near retirement.
NEWS
June 18, 2013
I was happy to see the benefits of intermodal transportation for city residents so clearly described in a recent Sun commentary ("Put people ahead of cars," June 5). I've begun to see a transformation over the last decade in Baltimore, and I am encouraged that we may yet see more improvement in the future. As a daily commuter from Baltimore to Washington, D.C., intermodal transportation is a way of life for me. Each morning I set out from my Lauraville neighborhood to Penn Station by bicycle and catch the MARC train to Union Station.
NEWS
By Jacqueline M. Carrera and Erik M. Dihle | May 28, 2013
The recent passage and signing of landmark forest legislation will help protect the health and well-being of all Marylanders for generations to come. Maryland has made a commitment to "no net loss" of our state's forests - both urban and rural - starting right now. With this safeguard in place, we can be confident that Maryland's air will be cleaner, our native wildlife habitats will be richer, and the Chesapeake Bay will be healthier and more productive than they possibly could have been if we had failed to act. For those of us working every day to make Baltimore an even better city in which to live, work, learn and play, much credit goes to our policymakers for recognizing that the state's forests do not end at the city limits.
EXPLORE
April 16, 2013
The overview of the Plan Howard 2030 General Plan states: "The purpose is to articulate policies and actions to move us to further sustainability while enhancing the quality of life. " The question is: What is Howard County's true vision? I ask because as comprehensive rezoning has taken place to date, it appears the vision is to merely grow, grow, and develop, regardless of inadequate infrastructure. Refer to Section 8 of Plan Howard 2030 — "Public Facilities and Services" as infrastructure comprises not only roads and schools, but other categories such as transportation, police, fire, health services, water and sewer, solid waste, etc. The Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance should be expanded to include all these categories to achieve accountability.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | February 11, 1994
The chief rabbi of the British Commonwealth, speaking this week at a seminar for Maryland physicians, agreed with a Roman Catholic ethicist that the value of human life must not be judged on the basis of its "quality."Lord Immanuel Jacobovits, who also heads a center on medical ethics in Israel, offered the example of an infant severely retarded because of a birth defect such as Down syndrome. Any consideration of "the quality of life" in such a case "has no bearing whatever on the value of human life.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
Going from four partners working out of Rajiv Jain's Columbia townhouse to 18 full- and part-time employees working across the country, a2z Inc. is a business built in Howard County. The company, which was established in 1998 and develops Web-based software to manage and market trade shows and events, is one of 7,426 businesses in the county enjoying a healthy economic environment and a nice place to call home. "We start with an excellent, if not unparalleled, geographic location," said Richard W. Story, chief executive officer of the Howard County Economic Development Authority.
NEWS
By Sara Kaplaniak | July 11, 2012
Recently, my neighborhood convened to discuss whether to host a weekly, open-air farmers market for producers from within 50 miles of our Central Pennsylvania town. After ironing out concerns about traffic, zoning and location, we decided to give it a go. I'm proud of my community for committing to its support for local farmers and promoting food that travels fewer miles to reach our plates. I'm also aware of how lucky we are to have this option for easily obtaining fresh, nutritious food.
EXPLORE
February 22, 2012
As a resident of Baltimore County, I am opposed to CZMP Issue 5-019 filed by JC Bar (CVS). The issue is one of public safety and continued quality of life in Carney. The proposed CVS location is on Harford Road only slightly south of the intersection of Harford and Joppa roads. Having vehicles, both northbound and southbound on Harford Road, enter and exit from CVS at this point so close to the failing intersection of Joppa and Harford roads will be very unsafe. What the failing intersection does not need is another large commercial enterprise to disrupt the traffic flow at this critical point on Harford Road.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.