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Quality Of Care

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NEWS
By M. William Salganik and Diana K. Sugg and M. William Salganik and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In a move that will help consumers and employers compare the quality of health plans, an industry group yesterday released a report that places the Columbia Medical Plan among the top five for "quality of care" in the country.Using data available to the public for the first time, the report measures plans' performance in dozens of ways such as the percentage of immunized children, the rate of births by Caesarean section and the percentage of doctors who are accepting new patients.
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NEWS
By Gene Ransom | February 9, 2012
At a time when physicians and policymakers alike are being asked to reduce health care costs without sacrificing quality care, it's crucial that we unleash the enormous potential for savings that could come from exciting new advances in health information technology. There's no better example of the revolution under way in medical care than electronic medical records and electronic prescribing systems, which not only allow doctors to generate prescriptions and orders electronically and transmit them directly, but provide instant access to drug reference information and a patient's complete medical history.
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NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2004
When Toby Adele Heller went for a physical exam July 26, 2002, the doctor found blood in her stool and recommended that a specialist evaluate her for, among other things, a tumor. Toby was profoundly retarded and could not speak for herself, so it was up to Baltimore-based Autumn Homes - paid $127,672 a year by the state to care for her in a group home - to follow through on the recommendation. They never did. Over the next 11 months, Toby would often lash out in apparent pain: screaming, pushing people, banging her head, according to records and interviews.
NEWS
By Samuel H. Fleet | August 20, 2009
The fever for health care reform is running high in Washington, D.C., and politicians are lining up on different sides to offer treatment plans. However, no one is addressing the true driver of health care costs, or any other factors that contribute to the health care crisis. Based on my 20 years of experience in health insurance administration, here are four ways to fix the health care crisis: 1. Restore competition in the market We need to break up the BUCA monopoly (Blue Cross/Blue Shield, United Healthcare, CIGNA, and Aetna)
NEWS
By Bruce Japsen and Bruce Japsen,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 4, 2003
CHICAGO - Responding yesterday to concerns that Americans lack critical information when choosing home health-care services, the federal government began publishing data comparing the quality of the nation's 7,000 home-care providers. The reports measure how effectively home health agencies provide care to patients in need of short-term help with essential daily activities - comparing everything from dispensing medicines correctly to getting patients out of bed or bathed. Administration officials say the comparisons might be more important than nursing home numbers released last year.
NEWS
By Christopher Scanlan and Christopher Scanlan,Knight-Ridder News ServiceKnight-Ridder News Service | November 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Congressional investigators have identified 14 veterans hospitals across the country where patients appear to have a high risk of developing serious complications from the care they receive.Their findings, to be detailed at two days of House hearings beginning today, are the result of an unprecedented study of computerized patient care records from all 172 hospitals operated by the Department of Veterans Affairs.There's no geographic pattern to the list of problem hospitals.
NEWS
By Robert Pear and Robert Pear,New York Times News Service | December 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In a significant policy change, Clinton administration officials say they will not prod elderly Medicare patients to join health maintenance organizations, in part because they have discovered that the government loses money on people enrolled in such private health plans.Bruce C. Vladeck, head of the federal Health Care Financing Administration, which runs Medicare, said he would not aggressively promote HMOs for beneficiaries until he could guarantee consistent high-quality care and had a better way of paying for it."
NEWS
By Danny Jacobs and Danny Jacobs,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2005
Upper Chesapeake Medical Center, with its modern brick-and-glass exterior and large windows in its open, airy lobby, feels more like an office complex than a hospital. And just as a business expands, the five-year-old Bel Air hospital is preparing for a $40 million expansion to meet the needs of a growing county population, all while pledging to maintain a high quality of care. "It was not a question of `if,' but `when' - and `when,' has come very quickly," said Lyle E. Sheldon, president and chief executive of Upper Chesapeake Health, which runs UCMC and Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace.
NEWS
By JANE WALDFOGEL | June 22, 2006
This month all across America, working parents will face the familiar challenges of summer - most important, keeping their children safe and occupied during the long school break. Schools, after all, are the major provider of care for children of working parents. And when schools close for the summer, parents must scramble. Two-thirds of American children live with two working parents or a single working parent. Yet most schools are open only 30 hours a week, 180 days a year, and they usually don't serve children under age 5. In fact, between the birth of a child and the child's 18th birthday, schools cover only one-third of the hours that a parent working full-time is at work or commuting.
NEWS
December 26, 2008
In 1993, Hillary Clinton, then the first lady, led an effort to reform the America's health care system that failed, in part because the public was excluded from secret planning sessions. Now, former Sen. Tom Daschle, who is shaping health policy proposals for President-elect Barack Obama, is hoping to do better. He is urging Americans to join in house parties this month to help develop ideas for new national policies to reduce health costs, boost the quality of care and get everyone coverage.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | August 13, 2009
As the crowd filed out of Wednesday's town hall meeting, Andrea Wimmer sat in her wheelchair under a tree, holding a neon-yellow sign that said, "When Obama rations out health care based on the 'worth' of a person, I'm screwed." Two years ago, shortly after her high school graduation, Wimmer was in an auto accident that left her partly paralyzed and in need of weeks of hospitalization and therapy. Wimmer, now 20 and planning to enroll in classes at Hagerstown Community College, attended the town hall meeting along with her mother to show their opposition to the president's plan to overhaul health care.
NEWS
By Caroline Poplin | March 12, 2009
Medicare is one of the most popular and successful programs ever devised in this country. It has improved the length and quality of life for millions of our most vulnerable citizens - the elderly and disabled - while affording them dignity, choice and security in their medical care. Despite the program's success, there are problems with the quality of care Medicare beneficiaries receive. Patients complain they have to wait weeks for an appointment with a primary care physician, if they can find one. When the doctor finally sees them, it may be for only a few minutes.
NEWS
December 26, 2008
In 1993, Hillary Clinton, then the first lady, led an effort to reform the America's health care system that failed, in part because the public was excluded from secret planning sessions. Now, former Sen. Tom Daschle, who is shaping health policy proposals for President-elect Barack Obama, is hoping to do better. He is urging Americans to join in house parties this month to help develop ideas for new national policies to reduce health costs, boost the quality of care and get everyone coverage.
NEWS
By STEVEN HILL | July 19, 2006
A report last month from the Citizens' Health Care Working Group, a nonpartisan advisory panel established by Congress, concluded that the federal government should guarantee basic and universal health care to all Americans. Such a universal system often is equated with a Canadian-style, government-run, single-payer system. But a survey of successful health care systems worldwide shows this is an incorrect assumption. For example, the World Health Organization rates France as having the No. 1 health care system in the world.
NEWS
By JANE WALDFOGEL | June 22, 2006
This month all across America, working parents will face the familiar challenges of summer - most important, keeping their children safe and occupied during the long school break. Schools, after all, are the major provider of care for children of working parents. And when schools close for the summer, parents must scramble. Two-thirds of American children live with two working parents or a single working parent. Yet most schools are open only 30 hours a week, 180 days a year, and they usually don't serve children under age 5. In fact, between the birth of a child and the child's 18th birthday, schools cover only one-third of the hours that a parent working full-time is at work or commuting.
NEWS
February 21, 2006
Without a lot of fanfare last week, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. took a small step toward providing low-income families better access to child care when he transferred authority for a child care subsidy program from the Department of Human Resources to the Maryland State Department of Education. As a matter of policy and practice, it's a good move. Last year, the General Assembly passed a bill, signed by Mr. Ehrlich, that took a number of child care functions out of DHR and gave them to MSDE, including licensing and monitoring child care facilities, providing incentives to improve quality of care, and maintaining and improving credentials of staff workers.
NEWS
By Roni Rabin and Roni Rabin,NEWSDAY | May 12, 2004
A report card that evaluated the quality of U.S. health care has concluded that American adults receive only about half of the treatments recommended for both acute and chronic conditions and half the recommended preventive care. The Rand Corp. report, based on one of the largest studies of health care quality ever undertaken, says inadequate care translates into tens of thousands of deaths and unnecessary complications, posing "serious threats" to the public's health. The study was published in the journal Health Affairs.
NEWS
November 27, 2005
Police say stores sold tobacco to minors Two Harford County businesses were recently found in violation of the state law against selling tobacco to minors. Harford County Health Department's tobacco enforcement manager, a Harford county officer, and a 16-year-old volunteer conducted unannounced tobacco compliance checks at 13 county businesses to determine whether merchants are complying with the Maryland Youth Access Law. At Meller Food Marts, 2403 Rocks Road, the 16-year-old was asked for identification and still was sold cigarettes.
NEWS
By Danny Jacobs and Danny Jacobs,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2005
Upper Chesapeake Medical Center, with its modern brick-and-glass exterior and large windows in its open, airy lobby, feels more like an office complex than a hospital. And just as a business expands, the five-year-old Bel Air hospital is preparing for a $40 million expansion to meet the needs of a growing county population, all while pledging to maintain a high quality of care. "It was not a question of `if,' but `when' - and `when,' has come very quickly," said Lyle E. Sheldon, president and chief executive of Upper Chesapeake Health, which runs UCMC and Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace.
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