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NEWS
October 4, 2012
Supporting the Maryland Dream Act, which allows children of undocumented immigrants who have graduated from a Maryland high school to attend state colleges and universities at the same in-state tuition rate as other residents, is a win for them and for the state of Maryland. Brought to this country through no choice of their own, these undocumented children think of themselves as Americans. They have played on sports' teams, gone on class trips, attended birthday parties and "hung out" with children of American citizens.
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NEWS
March 21, 2011
I am a teacher at Baltimore International Academy, and in response to the March 17 article " Charters emerge as threats to Catholic schools, I'm appalled by the decision of the archdiocese but sadly not surprised. According to the Catholic model, quality education is provided only if tuition is attached. This decision creates educational inequity. Only those families who can afford to pay are entitled to facilities where there is room to grow and innovative education for their children.
NEWS
May 14, 2013
Morgan State University President David Wilson makes a compelling argument that "receiving a quality education at the elementary and secondary level is a civil and moral right" ("Why education should be considered a civil right," May 13). I applaud his altruism, but elementary education is too late to solve this achievement gap. Sadly, kindergartners from low-income homes have an approximate vocabulary of 5,000 words while their peers from high-income homes have a 20,000 word vocabulary.
NEWS
January 6, 2011
I was dismayed to read your support of cutting education funding in your editorial of Jan. 4 ( "Easy choices and hard ones for Md.'s budget gap" . One in five residents of Baltimore City lives in poverty; the numbers of those in poverty in the county and in other jurisdictions are increasing. A quality education is what provides opportunities and hope to families that their children will experience less economic hardship. Poor children in the city and across the state will suffer disproportionately under any cuts to public education, and this is unjust.
NEWS
By Erica Puentes | May 28, 2014
I am a proud Baltimore City College and Roland Park Middle School alumna who now attends the University of Maryland. I want to thank the City College and Polytechnic Institute students, alumni, friends and teachers whose lobbying efforts helped secure funding for the gifted programs that allowed me to receive a quality education in Baltimore and will - as of Tuesday night's school board vote - continue to provide opportunities to city kids. My academic journey began in an elementary school in my West Baltimore neighborhood.
NEWS
By Wendy D. Puriefoy | February 8, 2012
Too much of the public is missing from public education. As a people, we recognize the economic value of education, but we under-invest in our schools, both financially and in terms of civic capital. With America's students and schools facing unprecedented needs, and education budgets under enormous pressure, it is time to drastically ramp up civic investment in public education. Our public school system - one of the great achievements of American democracy - is not just a service for the public to consume.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | November 14, 2009
An unlikely trio explored several Baltimore schools Friday as part of an effort to highlight education reform and challenges, and called on Maryland to give charter schools more autonomy. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich repeatedly emphasized the need for changes to the state's charter school law, which he called "too restrictive," as he, the Rev. Al Sharpton and U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan toured three city schools and spoke with students, administrators and others about their schools - and what sets them apart.
NEWS
September 27, 2004
DRIP. DRIP. DRIP. Like an engine leaking oil, falling academic standards decline in tiny increments. Educational excellence is neither attained nor lost overnight. But one day, you find a little oil puddle on the driveway. You swear you'll do something about it, only to be shocked when time passes and the car is junkyard bound. Somebody might want to check under the hood in College Park, where the University of Maryland's latest undergraduates are a tiny bit less impressive than last year's.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | August 29, 1993
Gary Dunkleberger wants to set the record straight, once and for all.Carroll teachers are not going to be promoting a homosexual lifestyle to students in their outcomes-based education, said Dr. Dunkleberger, the director of curriculum and staff development for the county's public schools.He also wants to clear up what he termed "misinformation" circulated by Carroll County Citizens for Quality Education, an activist group formed last spring out of dissatisfaction over a revised curriculum based on "exit outcomes."
NEWS
December 28, 2008
Nicole Fuller's story in the Dec. 21 edition of The Sun correctly characterized the discussions I and other school system officials have had in recent months with County Executive John Leopold and members of the County Council regarding the fiscal situation that exists in our county. However, the story contained two significant errors which must be corrected. First, I have never asserted in any way that Mr. Leopold or the members of the County Council were "not dedicated to the school system's success," as the story stated.
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