Advertisement
HomeCollectionsQuaint
IN THE NEWS

Quaint

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 8, 1997
This is how old and quaint the classic comedy "Room Service" is. At the start of the play, a theatrical producer and his company of 22 actors have been freeloading at a fancy midtown Manhattan hotel for two weeks.And they've racked up a bill of $1,200.The year is 1937 -- when ladies wore hats, when hanging a stuffed elk head on the wall was not politically incorrect, and when Broadway was still hospitable to serious dramas (instead of just musicals).In "Room Service," deadbeat producer Gordon Miller is trying to produce a play he's sure is a hit -- a play with a message, no less.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
A fellow editor takes note of this passage from a New York Times article out of Quinapondan, Philippines:  “My people are starving,” he tells the government workers, whose requisition notebooks do not favor this rural flyspeck, population 16,525. It's all in perspective. Before I became a big-time journalist and subordinate member of the East Coast liberal media establishment, I grew up in a little tobacco-farming town, Elizaville, Kentucky, population then about 100. The county seat, Flemingsburg, had about 2,000.
Advertisement
NEWS
By ELISE ARMACOST | August 29, 1993
The sign hanging inside the window of Chick & Ruth's Delly never would have fit in colonial Annapolis. There's no getting around that fact.Of course, neither would the Burger King up the street. Nor Fran O'Brien's, the Banana Republic nor the MOST machine at the bank. Nor, for that matter, the two leading opponents of the sign, city aldermen John Hammond and Carl Snowden, unless they start wearing powdered wigs and buckles on their shoes.Annapolis is an historic town. The city's uniqueness stems from its pre-Revolutionary War beginnings.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | November 16, 2012
While on the winding road in the Patapsco River Valley, I thought it had been 30 years since I last visited Oella, the mill village tucked deep into the hills between Catonsville and Ellicott City's Main Street. On a fall day, the rocky terrain, steep hillsides and leaf colors suggested that Oella might be in Vermont or West Virginia. Then I turned a bend and a resplendently restored Oella Mill appeared. It was one of those astounding moments, as if you hadn't been to Baltimore's harbor for 40 years and returned today.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | June 8, 1993
In George M. Cohan's "The Tavern," a young woman repeatedly refers to the main character as "quaint." The description doesn't really fit the flamboyant character, but it definitely fits this 1920 script, which is so hopelessly quaint, it's practically creaky.In fact, Cohan's chestnut has become such a staple of summer stock that seeing it at Olney Theatre is almost a cliche. This is not to say that Olney doesn't do a good job with it. To the contrary, from designer Thomas F. Donahue's rough-hewn tavern set -- complete with a bevy of mounted animal heads -- to the slightly satirical tone of Bill Graham Jr.'s direction, this "Tavern" in Olney is a most pleasant place to visit.
NEWS
By Beckie Burkhardt and Beckie Burkhardt,Special to Baltimoresun.com | July 6, 2005
Located where the Patuxent River meets the Chesapeake Bay and separated from the mainland by just a small stretch of water, Solomons resembles a peninsula more than a typical island. The Southern Maryland destination is a quaint, self-sufficient town that has something to offer any visitor that comes to her shores. Once a privately owned tobacco farm called Sandy Island, the 80-acre town played a small yet significant role in the War of 1812. Joshua Barney, a retired naval captain, constructed a fleet of small, easily maneuverable sailboats and rowboats to help fend off the much larger British navy as the attackers sailed up the Patuxent River to burn Washington, D.C. After the war ended, peace reigned and the economy boomed.
NEWS
By Beckie Burkhardt and Beckie Burkhardt,Special to Baltimoresun.com | June 24, 2005
Located where the Patuxent River meets the Chesapeake Bay and separated from the mainland by just a small stretch of water, Solomons resembles a peninsula more than a typical island. The Southern Maryland destination is a quaint, self-sufficient town that has something to offer any visitor that comes to her shores Once a privately owned tobacco farm called Sandy Island, the 80-acre town played a small yet significant role in the War of 1812. Joshua Barney, a retired naval captain, constructed a fleet of small, easily maneuverable sailboats and rowboats to help fend off the much larger British navy as the attackers sailed up the Patuxent River to burn Washington, D.C. After the war ended, peace reigned and the economy boomed.
NEWS
By JOHNATHON E. BRIGGS and JOHNATHON E. BRIGGS,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2001
Nestled on the scenic Chesapeake Bay, the city of Annapolis is a beacon that draws thousands to its historic landmarks, waterfront lifestyle and proximity to the dynamic Baltimore-Washington employment market. But being popular has its downsides. Congested roads, scarce parking and heavy crowds during tourist season tax the patience of residents. The Maryland General Assembly invades for 90 days each year, adding to the pressure. With property at a premium in the coveted city core, anyone looking for real estate in downtown Annapolis can expect to pay top prices.
NEWS
October 12, 2002
If you think soccer moms driving SUVs the size of summer cottages while talking on their cell phones are a menace, get ready for some really bad news. A "workplace" catalog has introduced the "front seat secretary," which promises to "transform any vehicle into a mobile office." It consists of a desk top that is secured to the passenger seat and has a stabilizing surface for the driver's laptop computer, printer and writing pad, and it includes a pocket for hanging files. That cell-phone driver will look downright quaint next to the hard-charging exec who's putting together the next big deal while putting the pedal to the metal on the Beltway.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1998
WESTMINSTER -- In Johanssons, one of the most flavorful, quaint -- and usually peaceful -- restaurants in downtown Westminster, there is a standard lunchtime conversation that goes something like this:First Person: " "Second Person: "Huh?"Then there is a pause. And the conversation does not pick up again until the Maryland Midland train finishes its jolting, jarring, clanking, blaring, altogether-way-too-LOUD jaunt through town.Baltimore may have its honking highways and construction screeching, but even Maryland's largest city has no noise like quiet little Westminster's noise.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | April 2, 2009
It may be the second-most-noteworthy thing about the now infamous poll conducted during City Councilwoman Helen L. Holton's 2007 re-election campaign - the response to a name-recognition question. After serving on the council since 1995, and thinking she might have a shot at a citywide office in the future, Holton surely had to be taken aback by these results: More than half of the respondents in her district either didn't know who she was or were only vaguely familiar with her. The most noteworthy thing about the poll, of course, is why Holton is probably better known at this point: The survey was paid for by developer Ronald Lipscomb, and it forms the basis of her indictment in January on charges of bribery, perjury and misuse of office.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | December 14, 2008
As with Illinois today, political corruption cast a pall over Maryland in the 1970s. A former governor, Spiro T. Agnew, had resigned the vice presidency in disgrace. Then Gov. Marvin Mandel was on trial for his political life. Lt. Gov. Blair Lee III imagined a kind of woodshed meeting with two of his illustrious forebears, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and Francis Preston Blair, a newspaper editor and adviser to presidents from Andrew Jackson to Abraham Lincoln. If these two men appeared before him, he said, he'd point out that he was still there at the "same old stand" - but a bit worried.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,[Sun Reporter] | May 24, 2008
A monthly feature exploring the stores, restaurants and sights of Maryland restaurants. Berlin, only seven miles west of Ocean City, is an antidote to a vacation overdose of sun, saltwater and mindless fun. The quiet, tree-lined streets of the town's historic district have a multitude of shops, art galleries and antique stores. The town is so picturesque it was chosen as the location for the filming of Runaway Bride and Tuck Everlasting. Berlin's historic district is lovely but small; it can easily be covered on foot in an afternoon, although you could linger there much longer if you have more time.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | October 7, 2007
In state-of-the-art homes teeming with technological toys, the notion of a daybed is almost anachronistic. Even the word seems oddly old-fashioned. But despite its quaint label, the daybed has been inching its way back into the design lexicon and retail stores for the last few years. Often deeper than a sofa, or slim as a twin bed with or without sides, it's more a generous settee than a one-sided chaise. Designed for more than sitting, it beckons. Whether you sit, sprawl or flat out nap on it, the daybed is the ultimate piece of cocooning furniture.
FEATURES
By Madison Park and Madison Park,sun reporter | July 6, 2007
A psychological thriller begins filming next week in Havre de Grace - its Victorian architecture and homespun quality caught the moviemakers' eye. The movie, titled From Within, is about a small town where it appears that teenagers are committing suicide. It stars Thomas Dekker, who portrayed Zach on NBC's hit Heroes last season and will play the young John Connor in Fox's new television series, Sarah Connor Chronicles, based on the Terminator series. Elizabeth Rice, who also stars in the film, has appeared in episodes of ER, Crossing Jordan and portrayed a teenage Natalie Wood in a biographical TV movie.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 20, 2007
Hot Fuzz pricelessly skewers big-budget Hollywood blow-'em-ups - especially ones with cops doubling as best buds - but shows a real affection for the genre even as it revels in its absurdities. And, as anyone who has ever seen Bad Boys or Bad Boys II knows, there are plenty. They're always in big cities, filled with gleaming skyscrapers and squalid slums. Things are blowing up. Everybody carries a gun. Women are relegated to the background. Hot Fuzz (Rogue Pictures) Starring Simon Pegg, Nick Frost, Jim Broadbent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gary Dorsey and By Gary Dorsey,Sun Staff | September 1, 2002
The Everlasting Stream: A True Story of Rabbits, Guns, Friendship, and Family, By Walt Harrington. Atlantic Monthly Press. 192 pages. $23. Walt Harrington was an effete Washington Post reporter shamelessly driven to manicures, Sokol Blosser Pinot Noir, $700 Tallia suits, fine art and antique collectibles. He was an apparent newsroom toady and know-it-all. A man of ample ambitions and certain talent. The story of how he managed to transcend his paltry manhood through rabbit hunting with his working class father-in-law could either be a comic romp or sentimental rubbish.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | March 20, 2003
Smallish Recepter radio delivers big on sound, reception In an age of digital music players and multimedia entertainment centers, the notion of buying a table radio sounds a bit quaint - it's the kind of gadget your grandparents might have left over from the 1950s. But listen to the tiny Boston Acoustics Recepter fill a room with sound and you might change your mind. At 4 inches by 7.5 inches by 6 inches, this $159 AM-FM set isn't much bigger than the average clock radio, but it produces a warm, rich output with a remarkably sonorous bass.
TRAVEL
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,[Sun reporter] | November 26, 2006
THINK FARMHOUSE CHIC. Farm stands beside boutiques with New York's finest designer brands. Pricey res-taurants down the street from lawns with rusting cars. Mountains looming over streams in towns with no streetlights. Local residents so against cell phone towers that your mobile just might not work there. Get over it. This is the Catskills, that famed resort region between New York City and the Adirondack Mountains, a place with just enough cachet to have trendy shops and fine dining but enough edge and quirkiness to make you feel like you're in a real place with real people and this is your own little secret.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | October 20, 2005
Two red buttons. One black plus sign with arrows on it (technically called a D-pad). Select, Start. Trying to count the hours spent on an original Nintendo Entertainment System can make a gamer's thumbs ache. That gray box with a flip-up lid and clunky video cartridges ate up huge chunks of some people's childhood. If you're between the ages of 20 and 40, you probably owned one or knew someone who did. This fall, the NES turned 20. The more it ages, the more gamers play it - even though newer consoles offer more options and detail.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.