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Quagmire

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By Gordon Adams | April 13, 2004
WASHINGTON -- The current turmoil in Iraq has led the press and policy-makers to make the Vietnam analogy. Senator Edward M. Kennedy has called it a "quagmire." It may be, but it is a quagmire of the Bush administration's own making. The analogy to Vietnam is not so much the situation in Iraq as it is the situation in Washington. The Washington quagmire has existed ever since the neo-conservatives in the administration decided that the United States would be welcomed as a liberator and that the United States could make Iraq a beacon of democracy in the Middle East, a view solidly in place before we went to war last year.
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NEWS
August 2, 2010
In his wildest imagination, Osama Bin Laden could not have found a better way to hogtie the U.S. military than Afghanistan ("Grim milestone in Afghanistan," July 31). Herman M. Heyn, Baltimore
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NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | July 14, 1994
Haiti is about the size of Maryland, but fortunately nobody in the Clinton administration seems to have noticed that. Otherwise, it might have been reason enough for this bewildered White House to put Mickey Steinberg in charge of our policy there.Actually, the Maryland lieutenant governor might be an improvement. So might a committee chosen at random from the telephone book. As refugees continue to flee Haiti and drown by the score in the sea, it's beginning to look more and more as though simple desperation will determine what our policy is going to be.Driven by domestic political considerations and without any coherent philosophy of its own concerning foreign affairs, the administration has donned its fatigues and flak jacket.
NEWS
December 1, 2009
A fter months of deliberation, President Barack Obama is scheduled to reveal his strategy for the war in Afghanistan on Tuesday. According to numerous news reports over the weekend, he will announce plans to send about 30,000 more troops to the region. That decision - which comes close to fulfilling Gen. Stanley McChrystal's 40,000-troop request - may be the safe move politically by a Democrat worried about looking soft in the war on terror. But we fear that it will prove to be a mistake.
NEWS
By Maureen Dowd | October 31, 2001
WASHINGTON -- As Rudyard Kipling's Kim reports back to his British spymasters, from the mountainous moonscape of Afghanistan, "Certain things are not known to those who eat with forks." After six weeks of a war at home and a war in Asia, we now understand what we do not understand. The terrorists and Taliban have the psychological edge on three fronts: military, propaganda and bioterror. George W. Bush was brought up to believe in Marquess of Queensberry rules. Now he is competing against combatants with Genghis of Khan rules, who hide among women and children in mosques and school dormitories, and who don't need an executive order to betray and murder.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2003
It is hard to determine when the word "quagmire" was first used to describe a foreign military adventure gone bad, but its etymology shows that it is an appropriate term. Quagmire's first syllable comes from the word "quake" - as in earthquake - and it originally referred to ground that appeared solid but actually gave way when stepped upon. That could be the description of the British in South Africa in the 1890s or the French in Algeria in the 1960s. In U.S. foreign policy, "quagmire" is usually associated with the war in Vietnam, which appeared to many to be a clear-cut case of stopping Communist aggression and expansion, but turned out to be a far more complex situation.
NEWS
By Robert Hanley and Robert Hanley,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 27, 2002
VERNON TOWNSHIP, N.J. - For those who trek from peak to peak along the Appalachian Trail, this is a definite low point. Aptly called the Pochuck Quagmire, a broad valley of empty meadow and soggy marshland here has long forced hikers to detour and dodge traffic along 2 1/2 miles of shoulderless highway. But now, thanks to years of hard work by a small army of volunteers, the quagmire has been turned into a scenic panorama that is attracting even casual strollers. State officials recently dedicated the new mile-long elevated boardwalk and a handsome 144-foot timber suspension bridge that traverse the meadow and the marsh.
NEWS
March 8, 1992
It took 16 months, but the state's special prosecutor has completed his investigation into allegations that State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman improperly released a police report detailing a drug search of a car belonging to the former campaign chairman of his rival in the bitter 1990 campaign. While the report says no laws were broken, the prosecutor did say Hickman released the report for "political advantage" and caused Scott W. Markle to be depicted "as a criminal without benefit of a trial."
NEWS
March 22, 1992
Editor's note: It took 16 months, but the state's special prosecutorhas completed his investigation into allegations that State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman improperly released a police report detailing a drug search of a car belonging to the former campaign chairman of hisrival in the bitter 1990 campaign. While the report says no laws were broken, the prosecutor did say Hickman released the report for "political advantage" and caused Scott W. Markle to be depicted "as a criminal without benefit of a trial."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Quagmire -- the word that embodied American involvement in Vietnam a quarter century ago now hangs over the Clinton administration's plan to send 20,000 U.S. peacekeepers to Bosnia.The vision of Americans being drawn into a crisis in Central Europe that is easier to get into than out of is at the heart of congressional and public misgivings over the mission.It is not a new concern. That legacy of Vietnam was revived in 1983 in Lebanon when 241 American troops, mostly Marines, died in a terrorist attack, and was recalled again in 1993 in Somalia when a humanitarian mission turned into a misguided political intervention and cost the lives of 30 Americans, 18 of them Army Rangers killed in a single firefight.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 25, 2009
"Lorna's Silence" speaks volumes. Its hero, played to ambivalent perfection by Albanian actress Arta Dobroshi, is an Albanian immigrant who's the borderline-unwilling centerpiece of a shady citizenship scam. She's married to a junkie named Claudy (Jeremie Renier), and the plan dreamed up by Lorna's pimp/accomplice, Fabio (Fabrizio Rongione), is for Claudy to die soon of an overdose - either forced or self-administered. Fabio doesn't care which. Then, he can marry Lorna off to a Russian who wants to stay in Belgium (since Lorna had been married to a Belgian, see, she's now a Belgian citizen, meaning her new husband would become one, too)
NEWS
By Patrick Seale | August 25, 2009
Whatever the outcome of last week's Afghan elections - the results are due Sept. 17 - the cruel fact is that the Afghan war is a deadly trap. It makes no difference whether Hamid Karzai or his former foreign minister Abdallah Abdallah is declared the winner. Rather than pouring in more troops, the United States and its NATO allies should urgently seek an exit strategy from that unfortunate country. The war in Afghanistan has lasted eight years, with no end in sight. It has claimed 780 American lives and more than 200 British ones.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Reporter | October 14, 2007
Sept. 11, 2001, hangs over the American political scene like one of those mirrored disco balls, shining lights in every direction, its ultimate message hard to discern. No candidate can hope to be elected president without trying to focus one of those beams, finding a meaning to this day of tragedy that can make it part of a compelling narrative of American story. But what part of the story should it be?
NEWS
May 30, 2007
This is to praise Rep. John Sarbanes for his courage in rejecting the Iraq war supplemental funding bill and to condemn Sens. Barbara A. Mikulski and Benjamin L. Cardin for their cowardice in supporting it ("Candidates spar over war funding," May 26). We have the raw military power to stay in Iraq indefinitely. But we have absolutely no ability to "prevail" there, whatever that may mean, in the chaotic environment our invasion has created. It is the presence of U.S. forces that fuels the insurgency in Iraq, and it is only by removing American troops that that fuel can be removed.
NEWS
June 18, 2006
Having refused for three years to try to come up with any actual constructive ideas about the war in Iraq, congressional leaders last week chose to put the enduring conflict smack in the center of the coming election campaign. Jeering at "cut-and-run" Democrats, the Republicans placed their confidence in a formula that would keep American soldiers in the deepening quagmire -- indefinitely. There it is: their strategy for victory. The maneuvering in the Capitol on Thursday and Friday was shameless and pandering, but at least it puts Iraq on the table for the voters to think about.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - Top U.S. military leaders acknowledged yesterday that the number of insurgent attacks in Iraq has not subsided in the past year, but they denied suggestions the mission was descending into a "quagmire" and stressed that the only way the violence would end is through the creation of political institutions in Iraq. Their statements were in sharp contrast to comments by Vice President Dick Cheney last month that the insurgency was in its "last throes." In a sometimes tense hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld dismissed the call from some lawmakers to create a timetable for withdrawing the 135,000 U.S. troops from the country.
NEWS
June 18, 2006
Having refused for three years to try to come up with any actual constructive ideas about the war in Iraq, congressional leaders last week chose to put the enduring conflict smack in the center of the coming election campaign. Jeering at "cut-and-run" Democrats, the Republicans placed their confidence in a formula that would keep American soldiers in the deepening quagmire -- indefinitely. There it is: their strategy for victory. The maneuvering in the Capitol on Thursday and Friday was shameless and pandering, but at least it puts Iraq on the table for the voters to think about.
NEWS
By Gordon Adams | April 13, 2004
WASHINGTON -- The current turmoil in Iraq has led the press and policy-makers to make the Vietnam analogy. Senator Edward M. Kennedy has called it a "quagmire." It may be, but it is a quagmire of the Bush administration's own making. The analogy to Vietnam is not so much the situation in Iraq as it is the situation in Washington. The Washington quagmire has existed ever since the neo-conservatives in the administration decided that the United States would be welcomed as a liberator and that the United States could make Iraq a beacon of democracy in the Middle East, a view solidly in place before we went to war last year.
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