Advertisement
HomeCollectionsQuadrangle
IN THE NEWS

Quadrangle

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 1998
PHILADELPHIA - Nearly 30 years after its last major construction project added dormitories, the student bookstore and a new research center, the University of Pennsylvania is in the midst of two major building and renovation projects that will again reshape its campus.One of them, called Sansom Common, will include in its first phase a 250-room hotel, shops and a new bookstore at an estimated cost of $73 million. The site is at the heart of the campus on a block bounded by Walnut, Sansom, 36th and 37th streets that for years has been a 2-acre parking lot.The second phase will include the creation of a new north-south street linking the hotel entrance to Chestnut Street, a major artery leading to downtown Philadelphia.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | October 24, 2007
From the outside, the newest buildings on the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus bear more than a passing resemblance to each other, with brick walls, white marble trim, sloping slate roofs and solid chimneys. But inside, they couldn't be more different. One has a distinctly residential feel, with a central seating area, library, gallery and other formal spaces. It conveys comfort, hospitality, graciousness. The other is a setting for interdisciplinary research, with concrete floors, exposed cable trays and pipes in the ceiling, a "high bay" laboratory containing robotic equipment and lounges designed to foster interaction between researchers.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 27, 2000
Seen from one direction, the newest addition to Loyola College in Maryland is a foreground building, its projecting roof soaring high above a stone base to mark a key entrance to campus. Turn the corner, though, and it's a background building, quietly framing the college's main quadrangle and deferring to the chapel that has long been its focal point. The ability to fill two roles at once -- the hero and the good soldier -- is just one of the memorable traits of the Joseph A. Sellinger, S.J., School of Business and Management, a $14.4 million, five-story structure that will have its grand opening in mid-October.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | September 11, 2005
Book-reading time is hard to come by for William R. Brody, president of Johns Hopkins University. Time did offer, this summer during flights to and from the new Johns Hopkins medical and musical installation in Singapore. But now -- with classes resumed, and Brody back in his Homewood office, the copy of A Brahms Reader, by Michael Musgrave, that sits on his large mahogany desk (once, the partners' desk of Johns Hopkins, 19th-century merchant prince) -- that book is unopened. And just out Brody' s windows, construction is beginning on the university's newest quadrangle -- a spectator lure for anyone, from a new freshman to the top administrator.
NEWS
May 23, 2004
Harford commencement exercises are detailed Harford County public school graduation exercises include: C. Milton Wright, 10:30 a.m. June 1, Towson Center. Bel Air High, 2:30 p.m. June 1, Towson Center. Fallston, 6:30 p.m. June 1, Towson Center. Joppatowne, 6 p.m. June 2, school football field. Aberdeen, 6:30 p.m. June 2, Ripken Stadium. North Harford, 6:30 p.m. June 2, school quadrangle. Edgewood, 6 p.m. June 3, Ram Stadium. Havre de Grace, 7 p.m. June 3, school auditorium. John Archer, 1:15 p.m. June 4, at the school.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | October 24, 2007
From the outside, the newest buildings on the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus bear more than a passing resemblance to each other, with brick walls, white marble trim, sloping slate roofs and solid chimneys. But inside, they couldn't be more different. One has a distinctly residential feel, with a central seating area, library, gallery and other formal spaces. It conveys comfort, hospitality, graciousness. The other is a setting for interdisciplinary research, with concrete floors, exposed cable trays and pipes in the ceiling, a "high bay" laboratory containing robotic equipment and lounges designed to foster interaction between researchers.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Meredith Cohn and Scott Calvert and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2002
The two men who hope to team up on a new convention hotel in downtown Baltimore know how to build things. Robert L. Johnson, 56, borrowed $15,000 in 1979 to start Black Entertainment Television and created an empire that he sold to Viacom for nearly $3 billion. Now he is pushing hard to bring major-league baseball back to Washington, despite opposition from Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos. Robert M. Gladstone, 73, chairs Washington-based Quadrangle Development Corp., which over three decades has built or bought 38 apartments, offices and hotels, totaling more than 11 million square feet.
NEWS
August 14, 1997
IT IS EASY to understand why a Washington developer is eager to build the first high-rise apartment building in Baltimore's central business district in more than a decade. The corner of Howard and Lombard streets -- near an expanding University of Maryland campus, Camden Yards and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway -- is in an area where most existing rental complexes are fully occupied with long waiting lists.This project by Quadrangle Development Corp., a big Washington player that has not been previously active in Baltimore, is of bellwether significance for two reasons.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | April 11, 2005
For years, prospective applicants to the Johns Hopkins University have found the admissions office in a three-story building that also contains offices of the senior administration, general counsel and equal-opportunity program. There's a receptionist and lobby, but no real place to get oriented, no immediate way to sense Hopkins' rich traditions and heritage. And the '70s-era building, Garland Hall, doesn't make a particularly welcoming first impression. All that will change by mid-2007, when Hopkins opens a four-level Visitors Center that's designed to be a new front door to its Homewood campus in North Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1997
Loyola College plans to spend $24 million over the next two years to construct a new home on its main Baltimore campus for the Sellinger School of Business and Management and a satellite facility in Baltimore County for business and graduate-level education.The Rev. Harold Ridley, S.J., Loyola's president, is scheduled to outline plans for the projects tonight during an awards dinner at the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel.During the dinner, Ridley and the business school board of sponsors will present the school's 1997 Business Leader of the Year Award to Charles M. Cawley, chairman and chief executive officer of MBNA America Bank, which is opening a new regional center in Hunt Valley.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | April 11, 2005
For years, prospective applicants to the Johns Hopkins University have found the admissions office in a three-story building that also contains offices of the senior administration, general counsel and equal-opportunity program. There's a receptionist and lobby, but no real place to get oriented, no immediate way to sense Hopkins' rich traditions and heritage. And the '70s-era building, Garland Hall, doesn't make a particularly welcoming first impression. All that will change by mid-2007, when Hopkins opens a four-level Visitors Center that's designed to be a new front door to its Homewood campus in North Baltimore.
NEWS
May 23, 2004
Harford commencement exercises are detailed Harford County public school graduation exercises include: C. Milton Wright, 10:30 a.m. June 1, Towson Center. Bel Air High, 2:30 p.m. June 1, Towson Center. Fallston, 6:30 p.m. June 1, Towson Center. Joppatowne, 6 p.m. June 2, school football field. Aberdeen, 6:30 p.m. June 2, Ripken Stadium. North Harford, 6:30 p.m. June 2, school quadrangle. Edgewood, 6 p.m. June 3, Ram Stadium. Havre de Grace, 7 p.m. June 3, school auditorium. John Archer, 1:15 p.m. June 4, at the school.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 13, 2004
Just as home audio and video runs in the blood of the tragic family in Andrew Jarecki's Capturing the Friedmans, documentaries run in the Jareckis'. In 2002, Andrew's brother Eugene directed The Trials of Henry Kissinger, the focus of tomorrow's "FilmTalk" at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral St. Unlike Capturing the Friedmans, which exploded guilty verdicts into shards of ambiguity, this documentary aggressively indicts Henry Kissinger, the national security adviser and secretary of state who gave America a new image of the "action intellectual" while his attackers say he was committing war crimes in Vietnam, Cambodia, Indonesia and Chile.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Meredith Cohn and Scott Calvert and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2002
The two men who hope to team up on a new convention hotel in downtown Baltimore know how to build things. Robert L. Johnson, 56, borrowed $15,000 in 1979 to start Black Entertainment Television and created an empire that he sold to Viacom for nearly $3 billion. Now he is pushing hard to bring major-league baseball back to Washington, despite opposition from Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos. Robert M. Gladstone, 73, chairs Washington-based Quadrangle Development Corp., which over three decades has built or bought 38 apartments, offices and hotels, totaling more than 11 million square feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 27, 2000
Seen from one direction, the newest addition to Loyola College in Maryland is a foreground building, its projecting roof soaring high above a stone base to mark a key entrance to campus. Turn the corner, though, and it's a background building, quietly framing the college's main quadrangle and deferring to the chapel that has long been its focal point. The ability to fill two roles at once -- the hero and the good soldier -- is just one of the memorable traits of the Joseph A. Sellinger, S.J., School of Business and Management, a $14.4 million, five-story structure that will have its grand opening in mid-October.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 1998
PHILADELPHIA - Nearly 30 years after its last major construction project added dormitories, the student bookstore and a new research center, the University of Pennsylvania is in the midst of two major building and renovation projects that will again reshape its campus.One of them, called Sansom Common, will include in its first phase a 250-room hotel, shops and a new bookstore at an estimated cost of $73 million. The site is at the heart of the campus on a block bounded by Walnut, Sansom, 36th and 37th streets that for years has been a 2-acre parking lot.The second phase will include the creation of a new north-south street linking the hotel entrance to Chestnut Street, a major artery leading to downtown Philadelphia.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 13, 2004
Just as home audio and video runs in the blood of the tragic family in Andrew Jarecki's Capturing the Friedmans, documentaries run in the Jareckis'. In 2002, Andrew's brother Eugene directed The Trials of Henry Kissinger, the focus of tomorrow's "FilmTalk" at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral St. Unlike Capturing the Friedmans, which exploded guilty verdicts into shards of ambiguity, this documentary aggressively indicts Henry Kissinger, the national security adviser and secretary of state who gave America a new image of the "action intellectual" while his attackers say he was committing war crimes in Vietnam, Cambodia, Indonesia and Chile.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | September 11, 2005
Book-reading time is hard to come by for William R. Brody, president of Johns Hopkins University. Time did offer, this summer during flights to and from the new Johns Hopkins medical and musical installation in Singapore. But now -- with classes resumed, and Brody back in his Homewood office, the copy of A Brahms Reader, by Michael Musgrave, that sits on his large mahogany desk (once, the partners' desk of Johns Hopkins, 19th-century merchant prince) -- that book is unopened. And just out Brody' s windows, construction is beginning on the university's newest quadrangle -- a spectator lure for anyone, from a new freshman to the top administrator.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1997
Loyola College plans to spend $24 million over the next two years to construct a new home on its main Baltimore campus for the Sellinger School of Business and Management and a satellite facility in Baltimore County for business and graduate-level education.The Rev. Harold Ridley, S.J., Loyola's president, is scheduled to outline plans for the projects tonight during an awards dinner at the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel.During the dinner, Ridley and the business school board of sponsors will present the school's 1997 Business Leader of the Year Award to Charles M. Cawley, chairman and chief executive officer of MBNA America Bank, which is opening a new regional center in Hunt Valley.
NEWS
August 14, 1997
IT IS EASY to understand why a Washington developer is eager to build the first high-rise apartment building in Baltimore's central business district in more than a decade. The corner of Howard and Lombard streets -- near an expanding University of Maryland campus, Camden Yards and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway -- is in an area where most existing rental complexes are fully occupied with long waiting lists.This project by Quadrangle Development Corp., a big Washington player that has not been previously active in Baltimore, is of bellwether significance for two reasons.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.