Advertisement
HomeCollectionsQe2
IN THE NEWS

Qe2

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Boston Globe | September 2, 1992
BOSTON -- With a thumbs-up from its captain and three cheers from its crew, the patched Queen Elizabeth 2 floated out of a South Boston dry dock yesterday and returned to sea, leaving a wake of hope for the region's job-hungry shipworkers."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2002
ABOARD THE QUEEN ELIZABETH 2 - The last two weeks of Robert Muller's journey aboard the world's most famous ocean liner he was dead. Which is just the way he wanted it. And that is just the way his widow, Beatrice Muller, hopes to go, too. Her husband died at age 85 aboard the QE2, as it is known, as it sailed off Bermuda in 1999, then was transported in the ship's mortuary to Southampton, England, where he was cremated and, eventually, buried at sea....
Advertisement
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | August 11, 1992
EASTON -- For Gregory S. Straub and fellow passengers seated around the dinner table, the Queen Elizabeth 2 ran aground sometime between salad and the main course.Mr. Straub, a Kent County resident taking his 12th voyage on the cruise ship, said he was in the dining room Friday night when "a terrific shudder" passed through the vessel. Mr. Straub knew that "very obviously, it had struck something."Mr. Straub, rector of the Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Chestertown, was among the 1,800 passengers evacuated from the 963-foot ship after it struck an undersea ledge and came to a sluggish halt eight miles west of Martha's Vineyard.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1997
Maybe it's not quite as elegant as it once was. But it is still the Queen Elizabeth 2, the benchmark for luxury liners.On a blustery day, with winds whipping at 35 knots, the legendary passenger ship returned to the United States yesterday after three months at sea, stopping briefly in Baltimore yesterday on its way to Fort Lauderdale, Fla. It was the QE2's second trip here since 1995.Five tugboats nudged the 67,000-ton vessel through the harbor's sharp curves into Dundalk Marine Terminal.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | January 4, 1995
For those who love the sea and its great ships, this book serves as a reminder that the era of the great Trans-Atlantic liners will finally draw to a close when the Queen Elizabeth 2 -- known commonly as the QE2 -- finally sails on its last voyage to the breakers' yard.The ship is descended from a grand pantheon of Cunarders with a pedigree so hallowed on the Great Circle Route that the years have not washed away their memory.The Mauretania, Lusitania, Aquitania, Berengaria, and the superliners Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth -- legendary predecessors on the North Atlantic route -- figure mightily in the QE2's heritage.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1997
Maybe it's not quite as elegant as it once was. But it is still the Queen Elizabeth 2, the benchmark for luxury liners.On a blustery day, with winds whipping at 35 knots, the legendary passenger ship returned to the United States yesterday after three months at sea, stopping briefly in Baltimore yesterday on its way to Fort Lauderdale, Fla. It was the QE2's second trip here since 1995.Five tugboats nudged the 67,000-ton vessel through the harbor's sharp curves into Dundalk Marine Terminal.
NEWS
By James Bock | November 25, 1991
It was like running into royalty at a truck stop.There she was, the black-hulled Queen Elizabeth 2, grand dame of the oceangoing passenger liners, her white upper works gleaming in the sun amid rows of containers, machinery and new cars at the Dundalk Marine Terminal.The QE2 quietly slipped in and out of Baltimore yesterday morning for the second time in eight days, disgorging 1,375 passengers from a Caribbean cruise before taking on 175 for a 30-knot trans-Atlantic voyage to Southampton, England, via New York.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2002
ABOARD THE QUEEN ELIZABETH 2 - The last two weeks of Robert Muller's journey aboard the world's most famous ocean liner he was dead. Which is just the way he wanted it. And that is just the way his widow, Beatrice Muller, hopes to go, too. Her husband died at age 85 aboard the QE2, as it is known, as it sailed off Bermuda in 1999, then was transported in the ship's mortuary to Southampton, England, where he was cremated and, eventually, buried at sea....
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | June 19, 1994
Cunard flagship Queen Elizabeth 2 will undergo a major modification -- $45 million worth -- of the layout and style of most of its public areas during its scheduled dry docking in November and December. The aim is to create "a new, distinctive lifestyle that reflects the vessel's heritage and tradition."One of the changes that will be immediately apparent as passengers enter the ship is a new two-story atrium in the Midships Lobby.Throughout the ship, a Heritage Trail of nautical memorabilia will reflect -- with original charts, ship models and a variety of maritime art displayed in strategic locations -- the history of navigation, of Cunard and of QE2 itself.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | November 14, 1994
The Coast Guard was searching off the Virginia coast yesterday for a 40-year-old Maryland passenger reported missing from the luxury liner Queen Elizabeth 2.The man -- identified as William Mark Bernhardt, from the Baltimore area -- apparently vanished Saturday between 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. while the QE2 was in the open ocean, approaching the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, said Petty Officer Al Bennett, a Coast Guard spokesman."
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | January 4, 1995
For those who love the sea and its great ships, this book serves as a reminder that the era of the great Trans-Atlantic liners will finally draw to a close when the Queen Elizabeth 2 -- known commonly as the QE2 -- finally sails on its last voyage to the breakers' yard.The ship is descended from a grand pantheon of Cunarders with a pedigree so hallowed on the Great Circle Route that the years have not washed away their memory.The Mauretania, Lusitania, Aquitania, Berengaria, and the superliners Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth -- legendary predecessors on the North Atlantic route -- figure mightily in the QE2's heritage.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 25, 1994
NEW YORK -- After being delayed for more than 24 hours when Coast Guard inspectors cited safety violations, the problem-plagued Queen Elizabeth 2 sailed from New York early yesterday.The departure came after a day of continued complaints from passengers who described the luxury ship as a floating DTC work-in-progress whose $45 million renovation was nowhere near finished when it left Southampton, England, last week. A number of passengers left the ship as repairs continued at a furious pace Friday.
NEWS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | November 15, 1994
The last time Mary Bernhardt saw her 40-year-old son, he seemed happy. For a Saturday morning competition on the luxury liner Queen Elizabeth 2, crew members had dressed up William Mark Bernhardt and two other men in women's clothing.Mr. Bernhardt did his best female impersonation. The audience and cruise director loved it. He won first prize -- a white dish with gold trim -- for his theatrics."He seemed to be having fun. The audience was applauding and having fun, too," said his 72-year-old mother.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | November 14, 1994
The Coast Guard was searching off the Virginia coast yesterday for a 40-year-old Maryland passenger reported missing from the luxury liner Queen Elizabeth 2.The man -- identified as William Mark Bernhardt, from the Baltimore area -- apparently vanished Saturday between 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. while the QE2 was in the open ocean, approaching the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, said Petty Officer Al Bennett, a Coast Guard spokesman."
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | June 19, 1994
Cunard flagship Queen Elizabeth 2 will undergo a major modification -- $45 million worth -- of the layout and style of most of its public areas during its scheduled dry docking in November and December. The aim is to create "a new, distinctive lifestyle that reflects the vessel's heritage and tradition."One of the changes that will be immediately apparent as passengers enter the ship is a new two-story atrium in the Midships Lobby.Throughout the ship, a Heritage Trail of nautical memorabilia will reflect -- with original charts, ship models and a variety of maritime art displayed in strategic locations -- the history of navigation, of Cunard and of QE2 itself.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | September 2, 1992
BOSTON -- With a thumbs-up from its captain and three cheers from its crew, the patched Queen Elizabeth 2 floated out of a South Boston dry dock yesterday and returned to sea, leaving a wake of hope for the region's job-hungry shipworkers."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 25, 1994
NEW YORK -- After being delayed for more than 24 hours when Coast Guard inspectors cited safety violations, the problem-plagued Queen Elizabeth 2 sailed from New York early yesterday.The departure came after a day of continued complaints from passengers who described the luxury ship as a floating DTC work-in-progress whose $45 million renovation was nowhere near finished when it left Southampton, England, last week. A number of passengers left the ship as repairs continued at a furious pace Friday.
NEWS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | November 15, 1994
The last time Mary Bernhardt saw her 40-year-old son, he seemed happy. For a Saturday morning competition on the luxury liner Queen Elizabeth 2, crew members had dressed up William Mark Bernhardt and two other men in women's clothing.Mr. Bernhardt did his best female impersonation. The audience and cruise director loved it. He won first prize -- a white dish with gold trim -- for his theatrics."He seemed to be having fun. The audience was applauding and having fun, too," said his 72-year-old mother.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 14, 1992
BOSTON -- The Queen Elizabeth 2 was about two-thirds of a mile north of her intended course and moving to distance herself from shoals off Cuttyhunk Island when she was jarred by an uncharted obstacle that left long gashes in her hull, the vessel's captain testified yesterday.But the captain, Robin A. Woodall, gave no indication why the luxury liner had abandoned the more southerly course that would have taken it through deeper waters.Captain Woodall testified that John Hadley, the local pilot who was advising him, had called for the ship to veer slightly northward.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | August 11, 1992
EASTON -- For Gregory S. Straub and fellow passengers seated around the dinner table, the Queen Elizabeth 2 ran aground sometime between salad and the main course.Mr. Straub, a Kent County resident taking his 12th voyage on the cruise ship, said he was in the dining room Friday night when "a terrific shudder" passed through the vessel. Mr. Straub knew that "very obviously, it had struck something."Mr. Straub, rector of the Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Chestertown, was among the 1,800 passengers evacuated from the 963-foot ship after it struck an undersea ledge and came to a sluggish halt eight miles west of Martha's Vineyard.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.