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NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Sheridan Lyons contributed to this article | December 10, 1994
A Baltimore County woman has agreed to refund $10,500 to players of a pyramid scheme in Pennsylvania after a large-scale investigation which has implicated thousands of participants including a small-town police chief and doctors in Philadelphia hospitals.Officials in Maryland and Washington are conducting independent inquiries in the illegal but wildly popular game that HTC promises to parlay a $1,500 investment into a $12,000 return in "Friends Helping Friends," the local version most widely played.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
The Naval Academy is about molding military leaders, but when it comes to scaling a greased-up, 21-foot-tall obelisk, it takes teamwork. That's what propelled 19-year-old Midshipman Michael Landry to the top of a writhing human pyramid Monday. He topped the academy's Herndon Monument with a midshipman's hat after 2 hours, 19 minutes, and 35 seconds - a feat celebrated by his classmates with jumping, cheering and singing. "Plebes no more! Plebes no more!" members of the Class of 2017 chanted.
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NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Dan Thanh Dang and Joe Nawrozki and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Staff Writers | November 17, 1994
Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said yesterday that his office has been "deluged" with calls from people who want to know if a wildly popular pyramid scheme that promises a $12,000 return on a $1,500 investment is legal.It isn't, he said, and people who "invest" their money are often likely to lose it.He said his investigators "are attempting to identify people involved to stop things before people get hurt and to identify the promoters for prosecution for what has become a very serious problem."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Toth | November 28, 2011
There are three points that need to be taken away from this week's episode of “Terra Nova.” One: Like Tolstoy wrote, “Every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way,” and I counted no fewer than three unhappy/messed-up families this week. Two: Plot development has also apparently been affected by the time travel, because it's moving about as slowly as prehistoric molasses. I feel like a mosquito about to be trapped in amber. Three, and most important: It is freakin' awesome to watch dinosaurs burn to death.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
The 39-member Cambridge Police Department is under investigation by Maryland State Police after allegations that the Eastern Shore town's sworn officers have been heavily involved in a popular but illegal pyramid game.Chief Russell Wroton requested the independent inquiry last month in a letter to state police Superintendent Larry W. Tolliver.The investigation, by the state police Internal Affairs Unit in Pikesville, is separate from other probes of pyramid games in Maryland, Washington, D.C., and Pennsylvania.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chicago Tribune | February 22, 2004
When officials announced last year that the outdated food pyramid would be revised, the International Bottled Water Association sprang to life. Water, it declared, deserved a spot in the ubiquitous triangle. Essential to life and free of sugar, caffeine and calories, water also received votes from a few citizens and nutritionists. The votes came during a two-month window that the public had in which to mail in comments on proposed changes to the pyramid. But the bottled-water industry isn't the only one thirsting for a treasured position in the pyramid.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writer | December 3, 1994
Marylanders who thought they had skirted the law by wagering in the wildly popular pyramid game in Washington now must find another place to play.Authorities in the nation's capital are cracking down on hotels where the games are conducted.After a request from U.S. Attorney Eric H. Holder Jr., officials of the District of Columbia Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs said they began pressuring hotels where players of the pyramid game met to avoid a Maryland statute that outlaws the scheme.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 3, 1992
I told my kids to think of the Agriculture Department's new pyramid-shaped chart of healthy foods as if it were a hot fudge sundae.The prized stuff, the stuff we should lap up, was on the bottom. The stuff we were supposed to take it easy on, like the maraschino cherry, was on the top. And as we ate our way toward the pinnacle, we took increasingly smaller bites.That was one of several attempts I made at translating the much-ballyhooed pyramid into everyday eating advice for my kids.The chart attempts to tell Americans about good dietary practices by stacking the basic food groups into four levels.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | August 18, 1994
It's all dressed up for the New Age, but the "Friends Network" now appearing in the Baltimore area is the same old pyramid scheme underneath, according to federal, state and local authorities.A flurry of inquiries to authorities the past few weeks signaled the first resurfacing of the popular scam since the mid-1980s, they said."We're receiving an average of 12 calls a day," Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said yesterday, "and we only get the tip of the iceberg."He planned to issue an advisory against the scheme today, and the Howard County state's attorney's office also is considering a warning.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 1996
If you're thinking about living longer and healthier, you might draw some lessons in longevity from the Chinese.Have a look at the "Traditional Healthy Asian Diet Pyramid" developed by Oldways Preservation & Exchange Trust, a nonprofit food-issues educational organization in Cambridge, Mass.Heavy on rice and grain products, vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds and beans, the Asian pyramid is a visual interpretation of the major dietary discoveries of the Cornell University-China-Oxford Project on Nutrition, Health and Environment based at Cornell.
NEWS
June 2, 2011
If you are sending a message to Americans about what we should be eating, it makes more sense to entice us with a plate rather than a pyramid. Today, First Lady Michelle Obama and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack followed that logic when they unveiled MyPlate, the federal government's latest healthy eating icon. Previous attempts abound; the 20-year-old food pyramid alone has had more makeovers than the "Real Housewives of Beverly Hills. " The new color-coded plate does not exactly make you want to chow down and seems to play down familiar American staples like meat and potatoes, yet it is easy to read and understand.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2010
Most of us are familiar with the food pyramid, the government's guideline for healthful eating. Now imagine a "money pyramid" for healthy finances. The Treasury Department is working on such a teaching tool right now, and it's seeking public input this week on what money maxims should be included. The agency wants your opinion on its proposed list of what adults need to know about five key areas of finance — earning, spending, saving, borrowing and protecting against risk. The goal is to put those concepts in an easy-to-remember format that can be used by financial education programs across the country — and to help us all make more informed decisions.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay and Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
The Maryland attorney general's office moved Thursday to halt an alleged pyramid scheme by a Gambrills company and its owner, who are accused of bilking about 500 people out of hundreds of thousands of dollars by promising commissions, free rent and cars in exchange for recruiting more investors. The plan started to fall apart when rent checks bounced and the investors were evicted. More than 115 people paid several thousand dollars into the company for an apartment, and most have been tossed out, according to authorities.
TRAVEL
By Christopher Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | November 25, 2007
TEPOZTLAN, Mexico -- Unless you have Aztecs in your family tree, you might find this city's name hard to pronounce. But so much else about the city is easy, or irresistible. The Aztec echoes, the steam baths, the ice cream, the pyramid, even the corn smut. Tepoztlan -- pronounced teh-pose-LAWN -- is a smallish city that sits in a lush valley rimmed by mountains that appear to have been smuggled out of a Chinese landscape painting. At its center, a 16th-century convent and church rise above a marketplace full of residents making tortillas, nibbling on fried grasshoppers and licking locally concocted sherbets.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | February 15, 2006
This year's 25th anniversary retrospective of works produced at Pyramid Atlantic, the artist-founded experimental print- and paper-making workshop started in Baltimore and now in the Washington suburbs, marks a milestone in the region's development as an artistic and cultural center. So it's appropriate that the local venue for this large traveling show is Maryland Art Place, which also is celebrating its 25th anniversary and was founded out of a similar impetus to create noncommercial exhibition spaces where regional artists could show and discuss new work.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
Like many Americans, Suzi Young struggles with her weight. Unlike many Americans, however, the 32-year-old school teacher is trying to get back on track by using a health tool that's often shunned for flashier fads. Forget South Beach, Atkins or Weight Watchers. Young lives her life by the U.S. Food Pyramid; she makes sure she eats just the right number of portions from each of the major food groups every day. That familiar triangular icon has just been revamped by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to add more color to represent food groups, a staircase to represent the need for physical activity, and a flashy new, interactive Web site to help you calculate your calories - all in the hope of persuading more people to choose a healthier diet and lifestyle.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1994
When grains -- breads, cereals, rice and pasta -- moved from the back of the breakfast table to star billing as the foundation of the new food-guide pyramid a couple of years ago, some people were pretty startled.2 Whisk all ingredients in a bowl until blended.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
Like many Americans, Suzi Young struggles with her weight. Unlike many Americans, however, the 32-year-old school teacher is trying to get back on track by using a health tool that's often shunned for flashier fads. Forget South Beach, Atkins or Weight Watchers. Young lives her life by the U.S. Food Pyramid; she makes sure she eats just the right number of portions from each of the major food groups every day. That familiar triangular icon has just been revamped by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to add more color to represent food groups, a staircase to represent the need for physical activity, and a flashy new, interactive Web site to help you calculate your calories - all in the hope of persuading more people to choose a healthier diet and lifestyle.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | April 26, 2005
TALK ABOUT a week in the news. By the time I had scanned the headlines, I didn't know if I was afoot or on horseback. After the remarkable pageantry of Pope John Paul II's funeral, we witnessed the election of a successor about whom it was immediately said that he would no doubt require his own papal funeral, sooner rather than later. Astonishingly, much of the commentary about Pope Benedict XVI focused on his age - 78 - and the fact that he isn't likely to be around long enough to be more than a transitional figure.
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